Skip to main content

Full text of "Announcement"

See other formats


Ill 










Serial 



Columbia Slnittfrtfitp 

THE LIBRARIES 




jfflebtcal JLibvaxp 



o> 



CO 

o 
o 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Open Knowledge Commons 



http://www.archive.org/details/announcement1939pres 



, 



Columbia University 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

Thirty-ninth Series, No. 22 May 13, 1939 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 



FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1939-1940 



C 







MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 



Columbia flUmberattp ^Bulletin of Snformatton 

Thirty-ninth Series, No. 22 May 13, 1939 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York, N. Y., weekly from mid- 
December for thirty-eight consecutive issues. Entered as second-class matter December 22, 
1936, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1 103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized. These include: 

1. Reports of the President and Treasurer to the Trustees. 

2. The Catalogue Number, Directory Number, and the Announcements of the several 
Colleges, Schools, and Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. These are made as 
accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon application 
to the Secretary of the University. 

C. U. P. 4,250 — 1939. 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York City. 



PUBLISHED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




Harold Haliday Costain 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1939-1940 




MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, B.S., M.D '. Assistant Dean and Secretary 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Hugh Auchincloss 
George W. Bachman 
William Edgar Caldwell 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
Haven Emerson 
Earl Theron Engle 
Benjamin Peter Farrell 
Frederick Parker Gay 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
William Worthington Herrick 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
James Wesley Jobling 
John Devereux Kernan 
Albert Richard Lamb 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Charles Christian Lieb 
Vernon William Lippard 



Robert Frederick Loeb 

Walter Gay Lough 

John Alexander McCreery 

Rustin McIntosh 

George Miller MacKee 

Ward J. MacNeal 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Dudley Joy Morton 

Clay Ray Murray 

Walter Walker Palmer 

Alwyn Max Pappenheimer 

William Barclay Parsons 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Thomas H. Russell 

Fordyce Barker St. John 

Philip Edward Smith 

John Bentley Squier 

Byron Stookey 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

Phillips Thygeson 

William Carson Von Glahn 

Benjamin Philp Watson 

Randolph West 

Allen Oldfather Whipple 

Francis Carter Wood 

Isaac Ogden Woodruff 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 
OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Professor oj Nursing and Executive Officer 

of the Department oj Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932 ; A.M., 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Projessor oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Projessor oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Projessor oj Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Projessor oj Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Assistant Projessor oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 



Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Beatrice M. Braun Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1935. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Dorothy D. Daubert, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Edith M. De Young, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hope, 1934; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Sheila M. Dwyer, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing (Niagara Falls), 1924. 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Ann A. Kirchner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Mary E. Ludes, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Marywood, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Rhoda F. Reddig, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1928 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen M. Roser, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1925 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1928. 

Cora L. Shaw, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Emily J. Simonson, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1938. 

Louise Stephenson Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Columbia, 1927. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926, Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen P. Wood, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Alice L. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, School of Nursing, Vancouver Hospital, 1918. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Richard Thompson, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Bacteriologist, Eye Service, Presbyterian Hospital. 

CHEMISTRY 

Marianne Goettsch, Ph.D Instructor in Biochemistry 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 
MATERIA MEDICA 

Howard G. Bruenn, M.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 
Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 

James W. Babcock, A.M., M.D Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 

Maynard C. Wheeler, A. B., M.D., Med. Sc.D. . . . Instructor in Ophthalmology 
Junior Assistant Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Gynecological Nursing 

James R. Montgomery, B.S., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Physician, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 

David D. Moore, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Medical Nursing Clinics 
Given by the Resident in Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital 

Obstetrical Nursing 

John M. Brush, B.S., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Assistant Attending Physician, Sloane Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Associate Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 

Richard G. Hodges, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Resident Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 
Iiwille H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Senior Psychiatrist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING y 

SURGICAL NURSING 

Robert H. Edgerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

SURGICAL NURSING CLINICS 

Robert H. Edgerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Richmond L. Moore, A.B., M.D Associate in Surgery 

Assistant Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clay Ray Murray, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Associate Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Barbara B. Stimson, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Surgery 

Assistant Attending Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 



UROLOGICAL NURSING 

George Winthrop Fish, A.M., M.D. . . . Assistant Professor of Clinical Urology 

Assistant Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 



PATHOLOGY 

Edith E. Sproul, M.D Associate in Pathology 

Resident Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clinical Pathology 

Howard G. Bruenn, M.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 



SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . . Educational Director, Social Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Provost of the University 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M Director of University Admissions 

Charles C. Williamson, Ph.D., Litt.D Director of Libraries 

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

'Roger Howson, M.A. . . . i Librarian 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

* On leave to December 31, 1939. 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Rev. Raymond C. Knox, S.T.D Chaplain oj the University 

Edward S. Elliott, M.D Director oj Athletics 

Benjamin A. Hubbard, Ph. B Director oj King's Crown Activities 

William H. McCastline, M.D University Medical Officer 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S Director oj University Residence Halls 

Robert F. Moore, A. B Secretary oj Appointments 

Clarence E. Lovejoy, A. M Alumni Secretary 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frederick Miller, C.E Assistant Director oj Buildings and Grounds 

Charlotte H. Adams, A.B Recording Secretary 

Thomas P. Fleming, M.S Librarian 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N., A.M. . . Director oj Residence, Department oj Nursing 
Manola R. Phillips, A.M. . . Recreational Director, Department of Nursing 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Dean Sage, President 
William E. S. Griswold, Vice-President 
William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

John F. Bush, Executive Vice-President 

Matthew C. Fleming, Secretary 

John W. Hornor, Assistant Secretary 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 



Managers 



Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Artemus L. Gates 
George Gibbs 
Edward S. Harkness 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
Duncan H. Read 
William Williams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Charles P. Cooper 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
John I. Downey 
William Hale Harkness 
William M. Kingsley 
Dean Sage 
F. Louis Slade 
Benjamin Strong 



Charles E. Adams 
Thatcher M. Brown 
William E. S. Griswold 
G. Hermann Kinnicutt 
David M. Look 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
John S. Burke 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Johnston deForest 
Samuel H. Fisher 
Matthew C. Fleming 
Walter E. Hope 
Robert A. Lovett 
James B. Mabon 



Ex-Officio 



Henry Evertson Cobb, D.D. J. V. Moldenhawer, D.D. 

L. Humphrey Walz 



G. Hermann Kinnicutt 
Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
Rustin McIntosh, M.D. 
Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 



Nursing Committee 

Mrs. Edward T. H. Talmage, Jr. 
Miss Marie Byron 
Benjamin P. Watson, M.D. 
Allen O. Whipple, M.D. 
Mrs. Staunton Williams 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Helen Young, R.N Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1926 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S., Columbia, 1933. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospi- 
tal, offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hos- 
pital was founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the 
establishment of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical 
aid and nursing care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Uni- 
versity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 
168th Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. 
Harkness and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the 
project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, 
and the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Oph- 
thalmology was opened in 1933. 

In 1935, the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for 
the educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, 
under the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Fac- 
ulty. This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of the University 
and the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials de- 
manded by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in 
the fundamental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. 
Well-equipped laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospi- 
tals, both general and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of 
the community in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient 
department and in visiting nursing. 

A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to acquire the knowl- 
edge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing profession. 

PREPARATION FOR NURSING 

The choice of a profession must be made by the student of today from a bewilder- 
ing number of possibilities. It is an important decision and should be made on the 
basis of as much knowledge as can be obtained, not only about the occupation of 
first choice, but about other possible alternatives. 

Dean Virginia Gildersleeve of Barnard College made an excellent statement re- 
garding educational preparation for life in a recent address in which she said: 

Every one's education should consist of two parts: liberal and vocational; or the impart- 
ing of wisdom and the teaching of techniques. This means the general development of your 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

intelligence and your spirit on the one side; on the other, the placing in your hand of tools, 
professional or vocational tools, that enable you to express your intelligence and your spirit 
in service to your fellow men. In this sense the art of nursing is a tool, so is the art of journal- 
ism, so is die art of politics, and so the lovely art of music. Without some such tool or 
medium of expression your intelligence and your spirit may be wasted, and not translated 
into action or into beauty. 

Nursing is one of the professions which appeal strongly to the young woman 
who has a real interest in people and a desire to be of service. It deals not only with 
those who are sick and in trouble, but also with those who are well. The safeguard- 
ing of health is an important phase of modern nursing. 

Whether the nurse is practicing her profession in the hospital or the private home 
or tenement, in the industrial plant or the rural community, she occupies a position 
of responsibility and honor. Any opportunity for testing one's ability to carry re- 
sponsibility and to work closely with others should, therefore, be welcomed, either 
at home, school or college, or as a volunteer worker in community welfare organi- 
zations. Her responsibilities as a registered professional nurse bring her constantly in 
contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the industrial physi- 
cian, the social worker, governmental and voluntary relief agencies, and others con- 
cerned with community health. 

The demands made on the physical endurance of the nurse are severe. Because 
the handicap of any physical defect is magnified in nursing, perfect health is a neces- 
sity for the person who decides on nursing as a career. 

Advice about courses which should be included in the educational program be- 
fore entrance into the nursing school should always be obtained from the school of 
nursing, as they vary in different institutions just as do the requirements for college 
entrance. Schools of nursing welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates well 
in advance of the date of entrance. 

The successful candidate for a modern school of nursing must give evidence of a 
high degree of intelligence and academic achievement, in addition to a serious in- 
terest in the problems of health and welfare. 

The wide variety of opportunities open to registered professional nurses and the 
economic security offered by the nursing profession entitle it to a high place among 
the desirable occupations open to women. 



THE NURSING COURSE 
ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five years 
and must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make for- 
mal application in writing on the blanks supplied by the School. After the applica- 
tion has been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the 
Department of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from 
high school should present a general average at least ten points above the passing 
mark of their school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. 
While no such specific requirement is made for college students, preference is al- 
ways given to those who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, as all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. This form is known as the nurse student qualifying certificate 
application and is furnished by the Department to the School of Nursing. All neces- 
sary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and aptitude tests and for the physical 
examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of 
the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary inter- 
view and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at 
the time of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She 
should, therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation 
arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experience in medical, surgical, 
obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives, in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course in one of the following groups: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced 
time credit of nine months, completing the course in two years and three months. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as 
well as for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, 
and sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as 
well as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on 
this basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to Co- 
lumbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who show 
evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, in- 
cluding those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements out- 
lined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualify- 
ing certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

As the selection of the school or college and courses of study is of great impor- 
tance, applicants should communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department 
of Nursing before making final decisions. Applications should be filed two years in 
advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a de- 
gree, certificate, or diploma in regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of 
the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as 
on the fulfillment of academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the period for which such registration is held valid. No 
students registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time 
be registered in any other school or college, whether of Columbia University or of 
any other institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in this Department. 

1 English, 4 units ; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; civics, V2 unit; electives, 7V2 units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics). The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 



ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 



15 



The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and subject to the reserve powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Uni- 
versity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entided to a dis- 
charge without the assent of his parent or guardian furnished in writing to the 
Dean. Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reasons of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the be- 
ginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of the 
first year. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay 
a tuition of $300 in two installments — $150 at the beginning of the first year and 
$150 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma only pay a tuition of $150 for the entire course, at the beginning of 
the first year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing (see page 14 for classification) : 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $10 $10 $10 

First tuition 150 150 150 

Second tuition 150 150 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 

Five sessions ... 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 

$370 $380 $210 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pro- 



16 COLUMBIA -UNIVERSITY 

vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

Experience has proven $10 a month to be the minimum amount necessary for 
personal expenses, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student nurses in this 
school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch situated in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room 
B-463, extension 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other stu- 
dent supplies. In addition it maintains theater and travel bureaus and facilities for 
cashing checks. Substantial savings are effected whenever manufacturers and pub- 
lishers permit. The store is open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students 
whose record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is 
excellent, and who are making a contribution in the social life of the School. These 
scholarships are not open to students until they have been in the School for six 
months. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the 
Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which the 
Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. She 
thus becomes a member of the American Nurses' Association and is eligible for 
membership in the American Red Cross Nursing Service. 

CRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing course may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING i 7 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements 
of the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met 
these requirements its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of 
Regents. These examinations are held three times a year (January, May, and Sep- 
tember) under the direction of the Department of Educadon of New York State. 
After passing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Profes- 
sional Nurse (R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian 
Medical Center are eligible for registration. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

After graduation, opportunities are open to nurses in many different fields. While 
the demand for the private-duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hospital or 
home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more important. A 
keen and sympathedc nurse with understanding of the possibilities of her vocadon 
in private duty may make a real contribudon, not only in nursing care, but also in 
health teaching. 

Specializadon in various clinical fields is possible by means of postgraduate 
courses. Many universities give academic courses for those wishing to prepare them- 
selves for execudve or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals. Public 
health is a large field including school and industrial nursing, and visiting nursing 
both in city and country districts. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the residence of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilides, the dining room, and 
study hall are located in this building. There are ten bedroom floors. Each student 
has a single room with running water. Every effort has been made to create a home- 
like atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 
monthly newspaper, known as Student Prints, is published by the students. Other 
activities include a Dramatic Club, Lending Library, Glee Club, Forum Club, In- 
ternational Club, and orchestra. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recre- 
ational Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreadonal rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to pardcipate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 

HEALTH 

The health of the students is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by 
the school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be 
indicated. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitously by the school physLian or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet die expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all dme lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed to each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the nine months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an addidonal ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 

VACATION 

A vacation of four weeks is allowed each student twice during the three-year 
course (i.e., at the end of die first and the second years) . To the student entering 
with nine months' credit for her college degree only one period of four weeks is 
allowed. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessides of the 
School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 14.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study, and 
practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued codrdinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day including the time spent in the classrooms. On Sunday and one other 
day each week the time on duty is limited to six hours. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block 
system is used. 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, where 
the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics are given by doctors on the wards once a week at which attendance is 
required, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student 
writes one case study every month. 

A special program of instruction in the Vanderbilt Clinic (the Out-Patient De- 
partment of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student dur- 
ing her two months' service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned 
to a special instructor. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute is given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Westchester Division of the New York 
Hospital. 

OPTIONAL AFFILIATIONS 

Three elective affiliations are offered during the senior year. In acting upon a stu- 
dent's request for these special courses, consideration is given to her general stand- 
ing in the School as well as to her plans for the future. 

1. Two months of field experience in public-health nursing under the supervision 
of the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service are open to a limited number of students. 
This introductory field experience includes observations as well as supervised prac- 
tice in caring for patients in their homes. The theoretical instruction is given by 
the education department of the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service. The program 
covers the curative, preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health serv- 
ice, which tends to cultivate the ability of the student to understand many commu- 
nity problems, often so closely connected with nursing. 

2. A three-months' course in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
Hospital, Westchester Division, White Plains, New York. 

3. A three-months' course in communicable diseases is given at Willard Parker 
Hospital, New York City. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 



The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 per cent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given under the direction of the department of 
nutrition of the Hospital in a special laboratory equipped for teaching purposes. 
The amphitheater and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available for in- 
struction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied widi the latest edidons of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia Uni- 
versity is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Roser. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Bacteriology. Thirty hours. Professor Thompson and Miss Ludes. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steril- 
ization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. Goettsch 
and Miss Ludes. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by 
class discussion and lecture. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of simple arith- 
metic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the apothecary sys- 
tem, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A study of the 
terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, pharmaceuti- 
cal preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of drugs are included. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Phillips. 

Discussion of the necessity of studying how to live ; the place of recreation in life ; the essentials 
of physical hygiene ; and the importance of mental attitudes in maintaining a well-balanced life. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Phillips. 

An orientation course in activities to assist the student to select an activity that she will enjoy 
continuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective 
after the Winter Session. Activities offered for class work and recreation are swimming, tennis, danc- 
ing, and gymnasium games such as volley ball, paddle tennis, handball, and ping-pong. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Reddig. 

An elementary course in the relation of sanitary conditions to health, with emphasis on public 
health education. This course runs parallel to bacteriology. Some of the topics discussed are: water 
supply, disposal of waste, and control of milk and food supplies. 

Lectures, class discussion, and excursions to the American Museum of Natural History, Sheffield 
Farms Model Dairy at Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, and the New York City Department of Health. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Stephenson and Miss Braun. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis: i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Vanderbilt and Miss Mutch. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. These demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of these classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital housekeeping. Thirty-five hours. Miss Wells and Miss Mutch. 

Special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to efficiency of service, interior 
furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing systems. Cleaning processes, 
disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply 
rooms. System of distribution of linen and surgical supplies. 

Bandaging. Twenty -five hours. Miss Mutch. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Fifteen hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history of massage, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations, the physio- 
logical effect and therapeutic use. Class practice of general and local massage, also observation in 
the physical therapy clinic. 

SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. D. D. Moore and Miss Roser. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases, class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. Supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Elliott and Professor Lee. 

A study of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal surgical conditions. 
Lectures and clinics by surgeons followed by nursing classes or demonstrations. Special emphasis is 
given to surgical technique. Supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Bruenn and Sproul. 

A course designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical diag- 
nosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discussions, 
and laboratory work illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. Closely related to the 
classes in medical and surgical nursing. 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Bruenn and Miss Ludes. 

A continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, emphasiz- 
ing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their effect. 
Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the action 
of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Stephenson. 

This course is correlated with the courses in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 



DEPARTMENT OF NU RSIN G 23 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt and Miss 
Mutch. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are dem- 
onstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in the class- 
room as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Miss Roser. 

A brief survey through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human behavior, 
directed toward giving the student a sympathetic and impersonal understanding of the motives of 
conduct with particular application to nursing. 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Montgomery. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Professor Fish. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Babcock. 

Lectures include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and throat and the 
care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Wheeler. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases and 
their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: the 
equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used 
in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. Miss Mutch. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical emergencies, 
including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and camp as well as in 
daily life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are emphasized. The course is 
based on courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for 
preventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by 
nurse instructors. 



Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

Lectures dealing with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and physical illness. 
The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. The underlying 
causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the part of the nurse 
in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric Institute where clinics 
and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 



24 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tra- 
ditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. Lectures illustrated by lantern 
slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which 
have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. Each student makes a visit with a medical social worker to observe home conditions in 
order to understand the background of her patients. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects cer- 
tain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demonstration and 
discussion to the class and instructor. 

One aim of this course is to prepare the student nurse to meet situations in nursing outside the 
hospital, using such equipment as is found in a home. 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

A continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class discussions give 
an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's experience. 



THIRD YEAR 



Obstetric nursing. Forty -five hours. 



Lecture and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instructor, given 
at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center. 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal condi- 
tions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty hours. 

Lectures given by representatives of different fields of health work, stating their main problems 
and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the student nurse to the varied branches 
of nursing in order that she may select with greater intelligence the particular field in which she 
is likely to find the greatest interest and success. 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



Columbia University 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

Fortieth Series, No. I 3 March 9, 1 940 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I94O-I94I 



M- 




MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 



Columbia ?Hntoer*ttp bulletin of Snformation 

Fortieth Series, No. 13 March 9, 1940 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York, N. Y., weekly from mid- 
December for thirty-eight consecutive issues. Entered as second-class matter December 22, 
1936, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 191 2. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1 103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
audiorized. These include: 

1. Reports of the President and Treasurer to the Trustees. 

2. The Catalogue Number, Directory Number, and the Announcements of the several 
Colleges, Schools, and Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. These are made as 
accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon applicadon 
to the Secretary of the University. 

C. U. P. 6,000 — 1940 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York City. 






PUBLISHED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




Harold Haliday Costain 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I94O-I94I 




MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, B.S., M.D Assistant Dean and Secretary 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Hugh Auchincloss 
George W. Bachman 
William Edgar Caldwell 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
Haven Emerson 
Earl Theron Engle 
Benjamin Peter Farrell 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
William Worthington Herrick 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
James Wesley Jobling 
John Devereux Kernan 
Albert Richard Lamb 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Charles Christian Lieb 
Vernon William Lippard 



Robert Frederick Loeb 

Walter Gay Lough 

John Alexander McCreery 

Rustin McIntosh 

George Miller MacKee 

Ward J. MacNeal 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Dudley Joy Morton 

Clay Ray Murray 

Walter Walker Palmer 

Alwyn Max Pappenheimer 

William Barclay Parsons 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Thomas H. Russell 

Fordyce Barker St. John 

Philip Edward Smith 

John Bentley Squier 

Byron Stookey 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

Phillips Thygeson 

William Carson Von Glahn 

Benjamin Philp Watson 

Randolph West 

Allen Oldfather Whipple 

Francis Carter Wood 

Isaac Ogden Woodruff 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 
OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Projcssor of Nursing and Executive Officer 

of the Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932 ; A.M., 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 



Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Beatrice M. Braun Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1935. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Dorothy D. Daubert, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Sheila M. Dwyer, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing (Niagara Falls), 1924. 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Eleanor M. Hall, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Ann A. Kirchner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Mary E. Ludes, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Marywood, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Beatrice H. Moore, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1935 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1938. 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Rhoda F. Reddig, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; B.S., Columbia, 1936; A.M., 1939. 

Helen M. Roser, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1925; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; A.M., 
Columbia, 1939. 

Cora L. Shaw, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Emily J. Simonson, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1938. 

Louise Stephenson Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Columbia, 1927. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Sarah Jane Wilder, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Cornell, 1936 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Helen P. Wood, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Alice L. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, School of Nursing, Vancouver Hospital, 1918. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

BACTERIOLOGY 
Richard Thompson, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Bacteriologist, Eye Service, Presbyterian Hospital. 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

CHEMISTRY 
Marianne Goettsch, Ph.D Instructor in Biochemistry 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

MATERIA MEDICA 

Howard G. Bruenn, M.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 
Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 

James W. Babcock, A.M., M.D Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 

Maynard C. Wheeler, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . . Instructor in Ophthalmology 
Junior Assistant Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Gynecological Nursing 

James R. Montgomery, B.S., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Physician, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 

David D. Moore, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Medical Nursing Clinics 
Given by the Resident in Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital 

Obstetrical Nursing 

JohnM. Brush, B.S., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Associate Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

Jean Corwin, A.M., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Associate Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Raphael Kurzrok, Ph.D., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Associate Attending Gynecologist, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 

Richard G. Hodges, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Resident Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 
Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Senior Psychiatrist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 



SURGICAL NURSING 

Robert H. Edgerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. Instructor in Surgery 

Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 



SURGICAL NURSING CLINICS 

Robert H. Edgerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Richmond L. Moore, A. B., M.D Associate in Surgery 

Assistant Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clay Ray Murray, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Associate Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Barbara B. Stimson, A.B., M.D. , Med.Sc.D Associate in Surgery 

Assistant Attending Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 



UROLOGICAL NURSING 

George Winthrop Fish, A.M., M.D. . . . Assistant Professor of Clinical Urology 
Assistant Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 



PATHOLOGY 

Edith E. Sproul, M.D Associate in Pathology 

Resident Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Clinical Pathology 

John L. Caughey, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M Educational Director, Social Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Provost of the University 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M Director of University Admissions 

Charles C. Williamson, Ph.D., Litt.D Director of Libraries 

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Rev. Raymond C. Knox, S.T.D Chaplain of the University 

Edward S. Elliott, M.D Director of Athletics 

Benjamin A. Hubbard, Ph.B Director of King's Crown Activities 

William H. McCastline, M.D University Medical Officer 

Thomas A. McGoey,M.S Director of University Residence Halls 

Robert F. Moore, A.B Secretary of Appointments 

Clarence E. Lovejoy, A.M Alumni Secretary 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frederick Miller, C.E Assistant Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Charlotte H. Adams, A.B Recording Secretary 

Thomas P. Fleming, M.S Librarian 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N., A.M. . . . Director of Residence, Department of Nursing 
Manola R. Phillips, A.M. . . . Recreational Director, Department of Nursing 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
OFFICERS 

Dean Sage, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Vice-President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

John F. Bush, Executive Vice-President 

Matthew C. Fleming, Secretary 

John W. Hornor, Assistant Secretary 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 



Managers 



Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Artemus L. Gates 
George Gibbs 
Edward S. Harkness 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
Duncan H. Read 
William Williams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Charles P. Cooper 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
John I. Downey 
William Hale Harkness 
William M. Kingsley 
Dean Sage 
F. Louis Slade 
Benjamin Strong 



Charles E. Adams 
Thatcher M. Brown 
William E. S. Griswold 
G. Hermann Kinnicutt 
David M. Look 
Dunlevy Milbank 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
John S. Burke 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Johnston deForest 
Samuel H. Fisher 
Matthew C. Fleming 
Walter E. Hope 
Robert A. Lovett 
James B. Mabon 



Ex-Officio 

Henry Evertson Cobb, D.D. J. V. Moldenhawer, D.D. 

L. Humphrey Walz 



G. Hermann Kinnicutt 
Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
Rustin McIntosh, M.D. 
Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 



Nursing Committee 



Mrs. Edward T. H. Talmage, Jr. 
Miss Marie Byron 
Benjamin P. Watson, M.D. 
Allen O. Whipple, M.D. 
Mrs. Staunton Williams 



Mrs. Henry P. Davison 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Helen Young, R.N Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

Rachel Anderson, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 193 1. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cf.cile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S., Columbia, 1933. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospi- 
tal, offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hos- 
pital was founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the 
establishment of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical 
aid and nursing care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Uni- 
versity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 
1 68th Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. 
Harkness and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the 
project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, 
and the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Oph- 
thalmology was opened in 1933. 

In 1935, the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for 
the educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, 
under the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Fac- 
ulty. This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of the University 
and the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the 
fundamental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well- 
equipped laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, 
both general and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of 
the community in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient 
department and in visiting nursing. 

A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to acquire the knowl- 
edge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing profession. 

PREPARATION FOR NURSING 

The choice of a profession must be made by the student of today from a bewilder- 
ing number of possibilities. It is an important decision and should be made on the 
basis of as much knowledge as can be obtained, not only about the occupation of 
first choice, but about other possible alternatives. 

Dean Virginia Gildersleeve of Barnard College made an excellent statement re- 
garding educational preparation for life in a recent address in which she said: 

Everyone's education should consist of two parts: liberal and vocational; or the impart- 
ing of wisdom and the teaching of techniques. This means the general development of your 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

intelligence and your spirit on the one side; on the other, the placing in your hand of tools, 
professional or vocational tools, thai enable you to express your intelligence and your spirit 
in service to your fellow men. In this sense the art of nursing is a tool, so is the art of journal- 
ism, so is the art of politics, and so the lovely art of music. Without some such tool or 
medium of expression your intelligence and your spirit may be wasted, and not translated 
into action or into beauty. 

Nursing is one of the professions which appeal strongly to the young woman 
who has a real interest in people and a desire to be of service. It deals not only with 
those who are sick and in trouble, but also with those who are well. The safeguard- 
ing of health is an important phase of modern nursing. 

Whether the nurse is practicing her profession in the hospital or the private home 
or tenement, in the industrial plant or the rural community, she occupies a position 
of responsibility and honor. Any opportunity for testing one's ability to carry re- 
sponsibility and to work closely with others should, therefore, be welcomed, either 
at home, school or college, or in volunteer work in community welfare organiza- 
tions. Her responsibilities as a registered professional nurse bring her constantly in 
contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the industrial physi- 
cian, the social worker, governmental and voluntary relief agencies, and others con- 
cerned with community health. 

The demands made on the physical endurance of the nurse are severe. Because 
the handicap of any physical defect is magnified in nursing, perfect health is a neces- 
sity for the person who decides on nursing as a career. 

Advice about courses which should be included in the educadonal program be- 
fore entrance into the nursing school should always be obtained from the school of 
nursing, as they vary in different institutions just as do the requirements for college 
entrance. Schools of nursing welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates well 
in advance of the date of entrance. 

The successful candidate for a modern school of nursing must give evidence of a 
high degree of intelligence and academic achievement, in addition to a serious in- 
terest in the problems of health and welfare. 

The wide variety of opportunities open to registered professional nurses and the 
economic security offered by the nursing profession entitle it to a high place among 
the desirable occupations open to women. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five years 
and must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make for- 
mal application in writing on the blanks supplied by the School. After the applica- 
tion has been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the 
Department of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from 
high school should present a general average at least ten points above the passing 
mark of their school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. 
While no such specific requirement is made for college students, preference is al- 
ways given to those who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be 
approved by the Department. This form is known as the nurse student qualifying 
certificate application and is furnished by the Department to the School of Nursing. 
All necessary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physi- 
cal examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of 
the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary inter- 
view and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at 
the time of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She 
should, therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation 
arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experience in medical, surgical, 
obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives, in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what' field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following classifica- 
tions: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced 
time credit of nine months, completing the course in two years and three months. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as 
well as for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, 
and sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as 
well as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on 
this basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to Co- 
lumbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who show 
evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, in- 
cluding those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements out- 
lined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualify- 
ing certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

As the selection of the school or college and courses of study is of great impor- 
tance, applicants should communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department 
of Nursing before making final decisions. Applications should be filed two years in 
advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a de- 
gree, certificate, or diploma in regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of 
the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as 
on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the period for which such registration is held valid. No 
students registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time 
be registered in any other school or college, whether of Columbia University or of 
any other institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in this Department. 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; civics, % unit; electives, 7% units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics). The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and subject to the reserve powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Uni- 
versity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a dis- 
charge without the assent of his parent or guardian furnished in writing to the 
Dean. Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reasons of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of fio must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the be- 
ginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of the 
first year. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay 
a tuition fee of $300 in two installments — $150 at the beginning of the first year and 
$150 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma only pay a tuition of $150 for the entire course, at the beginning of 
the first year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing (see page 14 for classification) : 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $10 $10 $10 

First tuition 150 150 150 

Second tuition 150 150 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 

Five sessions ... 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 

$370 $380 $210 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pro- 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

Experience has proven $10 a month to be the minimum amount necessary for 
personal expenses, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student nurses in this 
school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch situated in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room 
B-463, extension 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other stu- 
dent supplies. In addition, it maintains theater and travel bureaus and facilities for 
cashing checks. Substantial savings are effected whenever manufacturers and pub- 
lishers permit. The store is open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students 
whose record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is 
excellent, and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These 
scholarships are not open to students until they have been in the School for six 
months. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the 
Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which the 
Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. She 
thus becomes a member of the American Nurses' Association and is eligible for 
membership in the American Red Cross Nursing Service. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing course may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 




2 



:- 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements 
of the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met 
these requirements its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of 
Regents. These examinadons are held three times a year (January, May, and Sep- 
tember) under the direction of the Department of Educadon of New York State. 
After passing these examinadons the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Profes- 
sional Nurse (R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian 
Medical Center are eligible for registration. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

After graduation, opportunities are open to nurses in many different fields. These 
are frequently discussed under three main classifications: private duty, institutional 
nursing, and public health. 

While the demand for the private-duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hos- 
pital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more impor- 
tant. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of her 
vocation in private duty may make a real contribution, not only in nursing care, but 
also in health teaching. 

The additional clinical practice necessary for the nurse who wishes to specialize 
in a certain branch of nursing may be obtained by means of postgraduate courses or 
by general duty in the special service. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
affecting all s groups of society. Both in its general and its special aspects, such as 
school or industrial nursing, basic experience in visiting nursing and courses in 
theory are required. 

Many universities give academic courses for those wishing to prepare themselves 
for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or in public 
health nursing. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of 
the School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and 
study hall are located in this building. There are ten bedroom floors. Each student 
has a single room with running water. Every effort has been made to create a home- 
like atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence 
during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

monthly newspaper, known as Student Prints, is published by the students. Other 
activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, and 
orchestra. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recre- 
ational Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 

HEALTH 

The health of the students is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed to each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the nine months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 

VACATION 

A vacation of four weeks is allowed each student twice during the three-year 
course (i.e., at the end of the first and the second years) . To the student entering 
with nine months' credit for her college degree only one period of four weeks is 
allowed. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessities of the 
School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 14.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study, and 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day including the time spent in the classrooms. On Sunday and one other 
day each week the time on duty is limited to six hours. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block 
system is used. 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, where 
the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one case study every month. 

A special program of instruction in the Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient depart- 
ment of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during 
her two months' service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to 
a special instructor. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Westchester Division of the New York 
Hospital, and those completing the course in less than three years. 

OPTIONAL AFFILIATIONS 

Three elective affiliations are offered during the senior year. In acting upon a stu- 
dent's request for these special courses, consideration is given to her general standing 
in the School as well as to her plans for the future. 

1. Two months of field experience in public health nursing under the supervision 
of the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service are open to a limited number of students. 
This introductory field experience includes observations as well as supervised prac- 
tice in caring for patients in their homes. The theoretical instruction is given by 
the education department of the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service. The program 
covers the curative, preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health serv- 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ice, which tends to cultivate the ability of the student to understand many commu- 
nity problems, often so closely connected with nursing. 

2. A three-months' course in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
Hospital, Westchester Division, White Plains, New York. 

3. A three-months' course in communicable diseases is given at Willard Parker 
Hospital, New York City. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given under the direction of the department of 
nutrition of the Hospital in a special laboratory equipped for teaching purposes. 
The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available for in- 
struction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia Uni- 
versity is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Roser. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Bacteriology. Thirty hours. Professor Thompson and Miss Ludes. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steri- 
lization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. Goettsch 
and Miss Ludes. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of 
simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the 
apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A 
study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, 
pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of the drugs are 
included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Phillips. 

Discussion of the necessity of studying how to live ; the place of recreation in life ; the essentials 
of physical hygiene ; and the importance of mental attitudes in maintaining a well-balanced life. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Phillips. 

An orientation course in activities to assist the student to select an activity that she will enjoy 
continuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective 
after the Winter Session. Swimming, tennis, dancing, and gymnasium games such as volley ball, 
paddle tennis, handball, and ping-pong are offered for class work and recreation. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Reddig. 

An elementary course in the relation of sanitary conditions to health, with emphasis on public 
health education. This course runs parallel to bacteriology. Some of the topics discussed are: water 
supply, disposal of waste, and control of milk and food supplies. 

Lectures, class discussion, and excursions to the American Museum of Natural History, Sheffield 
Farms Model Dairy at Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, and the New York City Department of Health. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Stephenson and Miss Braun. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis: i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Vanderbilt, Miss Mutch, and Miss Hall. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital housekeeping. Thirty-five hours. Miss Anderson and Miss Hall. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to effi- 
ciency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing 
systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose 
and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution of linen and 
surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. Miss Mutch. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Fifteen hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history of massage, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations, the physio- 
logical effect, and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local massage, 
and observation in the physical therapy clinic. 



SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. D. D. Moore and Miss Roser. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Elliott and Professor Lee. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demon- 
strations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics 
held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Caughey and Sproul. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course is closely 
related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Bruenn and Miss Ludes. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Stephenson. 

This course is correlated with the courses in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt, Miss 
Mutch, and Miss Hall. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are dem- 
onstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in the class- 
room as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Miss Roser. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human be- 
havior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic and impersonal understanding of the 
motives of conduct with particular application to nursing. 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Montgomery. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Professor Fish. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Babcock. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and 
throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Wheeler and Miss Shaw. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases and 
their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: the 
equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used 
in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. Miss Mutch. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical emergencies, 
including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and camp as well as in 
daily life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are emphasized. The course is 
based on courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for 
preventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by 
nurse instructors. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tra- 
ditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which 
have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects cer- 
tain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demonstration and 
discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to prepare the student nurse to meet 
situations in nursing outside the hospital, using such equipment as is found in a home. 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

THIRD YEAR 
Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

Lecture and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instructor, given 
at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center, comprise this course. 
This instruction is coincident with clinical experience on the obstetrical service. 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal condi- 
tions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

This course is coincident with clinical experience on the pediatric service. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, stating 
their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the student nurse 
to the varied branches of nursing in order that she may select with greater intelligence the particular 
field in which she is likely to find the greatest interest and success. 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 






Columbia University 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



Forty-first Series, No. 27 June 14, 1941 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I94I-I942 




)°l^l 






MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST 168TH STREET 

NEW YORK 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, B.S., M.D Assistant Dean and Secretary 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Hugh Auchincloss 
George W. Bachman 
George Francis Cahill 
William Edgar Caldwell 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
'Kenneth Stewart Cole 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
2 Earl Theron Engle 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
Franklin McCue Hanger, Jr. 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
James Wesley Jobling 
John Devereux Kernan 
Albert Richard Lamb 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Charles Christian Lieb 
Vernon William Lippard 
Robert Frederick Loeb 

CONSTANTINE JOSEPH MacGuIRE, Jr. 

2 On leave Winter Session. 
8 On leave Spring Session. 



Rustin McIntosh 

George Miller MacKee 

Ward J. MacNeal 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

3 Dudley Joy Morton 

Clay Ray Murray 

Harry Stoll Mustard 

Reuben Ottenberg 

Walter Walker Palmer 

Alwyn Max Pappenheimer 

William Barclay Parsons 

Tracy Jackson Putnam 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Thomas H. Russell 

Fordyce Barker St. John 

Alan de Forest Smith 

Philip Edward Smith 

John Bentley Squier 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

Phillips Thygeson 

William Carson Von Glahn 

Benjamin Philp Watson 

Alexander Ashley Weech 

Randolph West 

Allen Oldfather Whipple 

William Henry Woglom 

Isaac Ogden Woodruff 

Irving Sherwood Wright 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Professor of Nursing and Executive Officer 

of the Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932 ; A.M., 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 



Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Beatrice M. Braun Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1935. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Dorothy D. Daubert, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Sheila M. Dwyer, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing (Niagara Falls), 1924. 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Eleanor A. Hall, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Isabel G. Harrell, R.N Instructor in Nursing \ 

A.B., Winthrop, 1931 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1935. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 









DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

j Ann A. Kirchner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Mary E. Ludes, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Marywood, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

]. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Jane L. Paton, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1935 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1938. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen M. Roser, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1925 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1928 ; A.M., 
Columbia, 1939. 

Cora L. Shaw, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 193 1. 

Emily J. Simonson, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1938. 

Louise Stephenson Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Columbia, 1927. 

Helen J. Walker, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1937 ; B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1940. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen P. Wood, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 192 1 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Alice L. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, School of Nursing, Vancouver Hospital, 1918. 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

BACTERIOLOGY 

James T. Culbertson, Ph.D Assistant Projessor of Bacteriology 

Richard Thompson, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Bacteriologist, Eye Service, Presbyterian Hospital. 

CHEMISTRY 
De Witt Stetten, Jr., M.D., Ph.D Visiting Scholar in Biochemistry 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

MATERIA MEDICA 

Howard G. Bruenn, M.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 
Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B.Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 

James W. Babcock, A.M., M.D Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 

Maynard C. Wheeler, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Ophthalmology- 

Assistant Attending Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Gynecological Nursing 

James R. Montgomery, B.S., M.D. . . . Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 

David D. Moore, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine- 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Medical Nursing Clinics 
Joseph C. Turner, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

Obstetrical Nursing 

John M. Brush, B.S., M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Associate Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. an d Gynecology 

C. Lee Buxton, B.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Jean Corwin, A.M., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Associate Attending Physician, Obstetrician, and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D. . . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 
Associate Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. an d Gynecology 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 

Richard G. Hodges, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Resident Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Senior Psychiatrist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 

Surgical Nursing 

Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Surgical Nursing Clinics 

Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Edward B. Self, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Resident Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Frank E. Stinchfield, B.S., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Assistant Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital and Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Barbara B. Stimson, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Surgery 

Assistant Attending Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Urological Nursing 

Lecturers from the Department of Urology arranged by: 

George F. Cahill, M.D Professor of Urology 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

PATHOLOGY 

Robert C. Horn, Jr., B.S., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Junior Assistant Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clinical Pathology 

John L. Caughey, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . . . Educational Director, School Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Provost of the University 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M Director of University Admissions 

Charles C. Williamson, Ph.D., Litt.D Director of Libraries 

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

3 Rev. Raymond C. Knox, S.T.D Chaplain of the University 

Edward S. Elliott, M.D Director of Athletics 

Benjamin A. Hubbard, Ph.B Director of King's Crown Activities 

William H. McCastline, M.D University Medical Officer 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S Director of University Residence Halls 

Robert F. Moore, A.B Secretary of Appointments 

Clarence E. Love joy, A.M Alumni Sea-etary 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frederick Miller, C.E Assistant Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Charlotte H. Adams, A.B Recording Secretary 

Thomas P. Fleming, M.S Librarian 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N., A.M Director of Residence, Department of Nursing 

Manola R. Phillips, A.M Recreational Director, Department of Nursing 

8 On leave Spring Session. 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Helen Young. R.N Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S.. Columbia, 1933. 






HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospital, 
offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital was 
founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the establishment 
of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and nursing 
care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Univer- 
sity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 168th 
Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness 
and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and 
the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmol- 
ogy was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Faculty. 
This affiliation marked another step in the closed integration of the University and 
the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the funda- 
mental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped 
laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general 
and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community 
in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient department and in 
visiting nursing. 

A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to acquire the knowl- 
edge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing profession. 

PREPARATION FOR NURSING 

The choice of a profession must be made by the student of today from a bewilder- 
ing number of possibilities. It is an important decision and should be made on the 
basis of as much knowledge as can be obtained, not only about the occupation of first 
choice, but about other possible alternatives. 

Dean Virginia Gildersleeve of Barnard College made an excellent statement re- 
garding educational preparation for life in an address in which she said: 

Everyone's education should consist of two parts: liberal and vocational; or the imparting 
of wisdom and the teaching of techniques. This means the general development of your 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

intelligence and your spirit on the one side; on the other, the placing in your hand of tools, 
professional or vocational tools, that enable you to express your intelligence and your spirit 
in service to your fellow men. In this sense the art of nursing is a tool, so is the art of jour- 
nalism, so is the art of politics, and so the lovely art of music. Without some such tool or 
medium of expression your intelligence and your spirit may be wasted, and not translated 
into action or into beauty. 

Nursing is one of the professions which appeal strongly to the young woman who 
has a real interest in people and a desire to be of service. It deals not only with those 
who are sick and in trouble, but also with those who are well. The safeguarding of 
health is an important phase of modern nursing. 

Whether the nurse is practicing her profession in the hospital or the private home 
or tenement, in the industrial plant or the rural community, she occupies a position 
of responsibility and honor. Any opportunity for testing one's ability to carry respon- 
sibility and to work closely with others should, therefore, be welcomed, either at 
home, school, or college, or in volunteer work in community welfare organizations. 
Her responsibilities as a registered professional nurse bring her constantly in contact 
with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the industrial physician, the 
social worker, governmental and voluntary relief agencies, and others concerned 
with community health. 

The demands made on the physical endurance of the nurse are severe. Because the 
handicap of any physical defect is magnified in nursing, perfect health is a necessity 
for the person who decides on nursing as a career. 

Advice about courses which should be included in the educational program before 
entrance into the nursing school should always be obtained from the school of nurs- 
ing, as they vary in different institutions just as do the requirements for college 
entrance. Schools of nursing welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates well 
in advance of the date of entrance. 

The successful candidate for a modern school of nursing must give evidence of a 
high degree of intelligence and academic achievement, in addition to a serious in- 
terest in the problems of health and welfare. 

The wide variety of opportunities open to registered professional nurses and the 
economic security offered by the nursing profession entitle it to a high place among 
the desirable occupations open to women. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and 
must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal 
application in writing on the blanks supplied by the School. After the application has 
been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from high school 
should present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their 
school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such 
specific requirement is made for college students, preference is always given to those 
who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. This form is known as the nurse student qualifying certificate 
application and is furnished by the Department to the School of Nursing. All neces- 
sary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physical 
examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of the 
desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time 
of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, 
therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experence in medical, surgical, 
obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following classi- 
fications: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of nine months, completing the course in two years and three months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as 
for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and 
sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well 
as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this 
basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, 
including those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements 
outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualifying 
certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

As the selection of the school or college and courses of study is of great importance, 
applicants should communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department of 
Nursing before making final decisions. Applications should be filed two years in 
advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a de- 
gree, certificate, or diploma in regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of 
the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as 
on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 
tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; civics, l / 2 unit; electives, 7V2 units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics) . The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in this Department. 



ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserve powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge 
without the assent of his parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. 
Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reasons of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the 
beginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of 
the first year. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay 
a tuition fee of $300 in two installments: $150 at the beginning of the first year and 
$150 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma only pay a tuition of $150 for the entire course, at the beginning of 
the first year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing (see page 14 for classification) : 

Group A 

Application $10 

First tuition 150 

Second tuition 150 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 

Five sessions 

Degree application 20 

$370 $380 $210 



Group B 


Group C 


$10 


$10 


150 


150 


150 




50 


50 


20 





16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pre 
vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

Experience has proven $10 a month to be the minimum amount necessary for 
personal expenses, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student nurses in this school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room B-463, exten- 
sion 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other student supplies. 
In addition, it maintains theater and travel bureaus and facilities for cashing checks. 
Substantial savings are effected whenever manufacturers and publishers permit. The 
store is open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is excellent, 
and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships 
are not open to students until they have been in the School for six months. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by 
the Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which 
the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. She 
thus becomes a member of the American Nurses' Association and is eligible for 
membership in the American Red Cross Nursing Service. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held three times a year (January, May, and September) 
under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. After pass- 
ing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse 
(R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center are eligible for registration. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

After graduation, opportunities are open to nurses in many different fields. These 
are frequently discussed under three main classifications: private duty, institutional 
nursing, and public health. 

While the demand for the private-duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hospi- 
tal or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more important. 
A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of her vocation 
in private duty may make a real contribution, not only in nursing care, but also in 
health teaching. 

The additional clinical practice necessary for the nurse who wishes to specialize in 
a certain branch of nursing may be obtained by means of postgraduate courses or by 
general duty in the special service. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
affecting all groups of society. Both in its general and its special aspects, such as 
school or industrial nursing, basic experience in visiting nursing and courses in 
theory are required. 

Many universities give academic courses for those wishing to prepare themselves 
for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or in public 
health nursing. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and 
study hall are located in this building. There are ten bedroom floors, accommodating 
350 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort has 
been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence 
during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 
periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other 
activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, 
and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recrea- 
tional Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 

HEALTH 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 
All students have X-ray examinations of the chest at periodic intervals. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed to each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the nine months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 

VACATION 

A vacation of four weeks is allowed each student twice during the three-year 
course (i.e., at the end of the first and the second years). To the student entering 
with nine months' credit for her college degree only one period of four weeks is 
allowed. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessities of the 
School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers; 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 









DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 14.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study, and 
practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day including the time spent in the classrooms. On Sunday and one other 
day each week the time on duty is limited to six hours. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block 
system is used. 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, where 
the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one case study every month. 

A special program of instruction in the Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient depart- 
ment of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during 
her two months' service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to 
a special instructor. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

OPTIONAL AFFILIATIONS 

Three elective affiliations are offered during the senior year. In acting upon a stu- 
dent's request for these special courses, consideration is given to her general standing 
in the School as well as to her plans for the future. 

1. Two months of field experience in public health nursing under the supervision 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

of the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service are open to a limited number of students. 
This introductory field experience includes observations as well as supervised prac- 
tice in caring for patients in their homes. The theoretical instruction is given by 
the education department of the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service. The pro- 
gram covers the curative, preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health 
service, which tends to cultivate the ability of the student to understand many com- 
munity problems, often so closely connected with nursing. 

2. A three-months' course in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

3. A three-months' course in communicable diseases is given at Willard Parker 
Hospital, New York City. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given under the direction of the department of 
nutrition of the Hospital in a special laboratory equipped for teaching purposes. 
The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available for in- 
struction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia 
University is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Roser. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Bacteriology. Thirty hours. Professors Thompson and Culbertson and Miss 
Ludes. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steri- 
lization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. Stetten 
and Miss Ludes. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of 
simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the 
apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A 
study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, 
pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of the drugs are 
included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Phillips. 

Discussion of the necessity of studying how to live ; the place of recreation in life ; the essentials 
of physical hygiene ; and the importance of mental attitudes in maintaining a well-balanced life. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Phillips. 

An orientation course in activities to assist the student to select an activity that she will enjoy 
continuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective 
after the Winter Session. Swimming, tennis, dancing, and gymnasium games such as volley ball, 
paddle tennis, handball, and ping-pong are offered for class work and recreation. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Harrell. 

An elementary course in the relation of sanitary conditions to health, with emphasis on public 
health education. This course runs parallel to bacteriology. Some of the topics discussed are: water 
supply, disposal of waste, and control of milk and food supplies. 

Lectures, class discussion, and excursions to the American Museum of Natural History, Sheffield 
Farms Model Dairy at Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, and the New York City Department of Health. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Stephenson and Miss Braun. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature of 
the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Vanderbilt, Miss Mutch, and Miss Hall. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital housekeeping. Thirty -five hours. Miss Hall and Miss Wells. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to effi- 
ciency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing 
systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose 
and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution of linen and 
surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. Miss Mutch. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Fifteen hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its physio- 
logical effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local massage, 
and observation in the physical therapy clinic. 

SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. D. D. Moore and Miss Roser. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Elliott and Professor Lee. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demon- 
strations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics 
held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Caughey and Horn. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course is closely 
related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Bruenn and Miss Ludes. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Stephenson. 

This course is correlated with the courses in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt, Miss 
Mutch, and Miss Hall. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are dem- 
onstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in the class- 
room as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Miss Roser. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human be- 
havior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic and impersonal understanding of the 
motives of conduct with particular application to nursing. 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Montgomery. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Professor Cahill and staff. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Babcock. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and 
throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Wheeler and Miss Shaw. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases and 
their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: the 
equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used 
in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. Miss Mutch. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical emergencies, 
including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and camp as well as in daily 
life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are emphasized. The course is based on 
courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for pre- 
ventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by 
nurse instructors. 



Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tra- 
ditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which 
have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects cer- 
tain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demonstration and 
discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to prepare the student nurse to meet 
situations in nursing outside the hospital, using such equipment as is found in a home. 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

THIRD YEAR 



Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. 



Lecture and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instructor, given 
at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center, comprise this course. 
This instruction is coincident with clinical experience on the obstetrical service. 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal condi- 
tions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

This course is coincident with clinical experience on the pediatric service. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, statin? 
their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the student nurse 
to the varied branches of nursing in order that she may select with greater intelligence the particular 
field in which she is likely to find the greatest interest and success. 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 






Columbia University 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



Forty-second Series, No. 26 June 6, 1942 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

- '43 ,jOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I942-I943 




I 



MEDICAL CENTER 

62O WEST l68TH STREET 

NEW YORK 



Columbia WLnibtt&itp ^Bulletin of information 

Forty-second Scries, No. 26 June 6, 1942 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York, N. Y., weekly from mid- 
December for thirty-six consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter December 13, 
1 94 1, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 191 2. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1 103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized. 

These include the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the Announcements of the 
several Colleges and Schools and of certain Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as 
circumstances require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon 
application to the Secretary of the University. 
C. U. P. 6,100 — 1942 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York City. 



PUBLISHED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVBRSITY PRESS 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




Harold Haliday Costain 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1942-1943 




MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 
NEW YORK 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, BS., M.D Assistant Dean and Secretary 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Hugh Auchincloss 
George Francis Cahill 
William Edgar Caldwell 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
Kenneth Stewart Cole 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
Earl Theron Engle 
George Winthrop Fish 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
Franklin McCue Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
Frederick Brown Humphreys 
James Wesley Jobling 
John Devereux Kernan 
Homer Davies Kesten 
Albert Richard Lamb 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Charles Christian Lieb 
Vernon William Lippard 
Robert Frederick Loeb 



CoNSTANTINE JOSEPH MacGuIRE, Jr. 

Rustin McIntosh 

George Miller MacKee 

Ward J. MacNeal 

Howard Harris Mason 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Dudley Joy Morton 

Michael George Mulinos 

Clay Ray Murray 

Harry Stoll Mustard 

Reuben Ottenberg 

Walter Walker Palmer 

Alwyn Max Pappenheimer 

x William Barclay Parsons 

Tracy Jackson Putnam 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Henry Alsop Riley 

Thomas H. Russell 

Fordyce Barker St. John 

Alan de Forest Smith 

Philip Edward Smith 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

Phillips Thygeson 

Benjamin Philp Watson 

Randolph West 

Allen Oldfather Whipple 

William Henry Woglom 

Isaac Ogden Woodruff 

Irving Sherwood Wright 



1 On leave 1942-1943. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Professor of Nursing and Executive Officer 

of the Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932 ; A.M., 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 



Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N . . Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Dorothy D. Daubert, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Sheila M. Dwyer, R.N. Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing (Niagara Falls) , 1924. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N. Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Isabel G. Harrell, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Winthrop, 1931 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1935. 

Margaret ]. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Corinne G. Hogden Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Cincinnati, 1934. 

Ann A. Kirchner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Katherine B. Lewis, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Ethel F. Nord, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 ; A.B., Hunter, 1941. 

Jane L. Paton, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1935 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1938. 

Marie L. Pedeflous, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Duke, 1939; B.S., Columbia, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1942. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Marguerite W. Potter, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1935 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Cora L. Shaw, R.N ... Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Emily J. Simonson, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1938. 

Louise Stephenson Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Columbia, 1927. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen P. Wood, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; A.M., 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Alice L. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, School of Nursing, Vancouver Hospital, 1918 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

James T. Culbertson, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

CHEMISTRY 

De Witt Stetten, Jr., M.D., Ph.D Instructor in Biochemistry 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



MASSAGE 



Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

MATERIA MEDICA 

Howard G. Bruenn, M.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 



NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 
Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 

James W. Babcock, A.M., M.D Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 

Maynard C. Wheeler, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Assistant Attending Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Gynecological Nursing 

James R. Montgomery, B.S., M.D. . . . Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 

John K. Curtis, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Medical Nursing Clinics 

George A. Perera, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Resident Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Obstetrical Nursing 

John M. Brush, B.S., M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Associate Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. an ^ GvnecoloPV 

C. Lee Buxton, B.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . . Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

Jean Corwin, A.M., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Associate Attending Physician, Obstetrician, and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D. . . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 
Associate Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. and Gynecology 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 

David M. Greeley, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Resident Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Senior Psychiatrist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 

Surgical Nursing 

Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Surgical Nursing Clinics 

Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Jose M. Ferrer, Jr., A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Resident Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clay Ray Murray, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Attending Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Urological Nursing 

Lecturers from the Department of Urology arranged by: 

George F. Cahill, M.D Professor of Urology 

PATHOLOGY 

Edith E. Sproul, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Assistant Attending Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clinical Pathology 

John L. Caughey, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Harry M. Rose, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Resident Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 



Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . . . Educational Director, School Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Provost of the University 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M Director of University Admissions 

Charles C. Williamson, Ph.D., Litt.D Director of Libraries 

Edward }. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Rev. Stephen Fielding Bayne, Jr., S.T.M Chaplain of the University 

Edward S. Elliott, M.D Director of Athletics 

Benjamin A. Hubbard, Ph.B Director of King's Crown Activities 

William H. McCastline, M.D University Medical Officer 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S . . Director of University Residence Halls 

Robert F. Moore, A.B Secretary of Appointments 

Clarence E. Lovejoy, A.M Alumni Secretary 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frederick Miller, C.E Assistant Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Charlotte H. Adams, A.B Recording Seci-etary 

Thomas P. Fleming, M.S Librarian 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N., A.M. . . . Director of Residence, Department of Nursing 
Manola R. Phillips, A.M Recreational Director, Department of Nursing 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Dean Sage, President 
William E. S. Griswold, Vice-President 
William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 
John F. Bush, Executive Vice-President 

Matthew C. Fleming, Secretary 
John W. Hornor, Assistant Secretary 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 
Benjamin Strong, Assistant Treasurer 



Managers 



Charles E. Adams 
Thatcher M. Brown 
William E. S. Griswold 
G. Hermann Kinnicutt 
David M. Look 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

William E. Stevenson 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Johnston deForest 
Samuel H. Fisher 
Matthew C. Fleming 
Walter E. Hope 
Charles S. Munson 



Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Artemus L. Gates 
Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 
John W. Honor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
Duncan H. Read 
Dean Sage, Jr. 
William Williams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Charles P. Cooper 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
John I. Downey 
William Hale Harkness 
William M. Kingsley 
Dean Sage 
F. Louis Slade 
Benjamin Strong 



Henry Evertson Cobb, D.D. 



Ex-Officio 

J. V. Moldenhawer, D.D. 
L. Humphrey Walz 



Nursing Committee 

G. Hermann Kinnicutt, Chairman 
Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 

Miss Marie Byron Dean Sage 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison Benjamin P. Watson, M.D. 

Mrs. Frederic F. de Rham Allen O. Whipple, M.D. 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. Mrs. Staunton Williams 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Helen Young, R.N Director oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; A.M., Co- 
lumbia, 1941. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director oj Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S., Columbia, 1933. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospital, 
offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital was 
founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the establishment 
of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and nursing 
care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Univer- 
sity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 168th 
Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness 
and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Insdtute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and 
the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmol- 
ogy was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Faculty. 
This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of the University and 
the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the School of 
Nursing. Nineteen hundred and fifty-four nurses have graduated here in this half 
century. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the funda- 
mental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped 
laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general 
and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community 
in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient department and in 
visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to 
acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing 
profession. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The student today must choose her occupation from a bewildering number of 
possibilities. There is real wisdom in the advice of the vocational guidance coun- 
selors to give careful consideration to at least three possibilities before making a 
final choice. 

For many reasons nursing holds an enviable position among the occupations open 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

to young women at this time. In an era when a strong emphasis on destruction is 
inevitable, nursing offers constructive activity with health as a positive goal. Prob- 
ably no one would question the truth of Mr. Walter Lippmann's statement at our 
graduation exercises last year: "Health is the greatest single asset of an individual 
or a nation." The necessity of skillful, intelligent nursing care and the maintenance 
of health services is universally recognized, bodi for our military forces and for the 
civilian population. Nursing thus provides the finest type of patriotic service in a 
field which belongs primarily to women, in peace or war. 

Many young women are seeking avenues of service for the duration of the war, 
without intending to pursue them indefinitely. The study of nursing involves knowl- 
edge and skill which will be of immense value to the wife and mother. It would be 
difficult to secure better preparation for marriage or for future influence in the 
community. 

There is a widespread impression that the young woman who enters a school of 
nursing is postponing the date of her usefulness for two or three years. Nothing 
could be farther from the truth. In most schools of nursing, students are assigned to 
part-time duty on the wards after a very few months. They begin at once to relieve 
other nursing personnel for the more important duties requiring greater experience. 
The student nurse, therefore, begins her professional usefulness almost immediately. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly: 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical 
defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to men- 
tion may be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements vary with the school. Advice about courses which should 
be included in the educational program before entrance should be secured from the 
schools of nursing, which will welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates 
well in advance of the date of entrance. All schools expect evidence of real intelli- 
gence and academic achievement. 

Any opportunity for testing one's ability to carry responsibility and to work har- 
moniously with others should be used, whether at home, school, college, or in 
volunteer work in community welfare organizations. Many of the courses offered 
by the American Red Cross, such as those in home nursing, first aid, and the eighty- 
hour course for volunteer nurses' aides, present practical "worksarnples" of nursing. 
They furnish an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for nursing, and the 
seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 



THE NURSING COURSE 
ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and 
must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal 
application in writing on the blanks supplied by the School. After the application has 
been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from high school 
should present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their 
school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such 
specific requirement is made for college students, preference is always given to those 
who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. This form is known as the nurse student qualifying certificate 
application and is furnished by the Department to the School of Nursing. All neces- 
sary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physi- 
cal examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of 
the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time 
of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, 
therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experience in medical, surgical, 
obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following classi- 
fications: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as 
for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and 
sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well 
as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this 
basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is 
frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or university else- 
where and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, 
including those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements 
outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualifying 
certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should be ap- 
proved by the University before final selections are made. Applicants should there- 
fore communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing two 
years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a de- 
gree, certificate, or diploma in regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of 
the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as 
on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 
tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; civics, V2 unit; electives, 7V2 units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics). The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in this Department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserve powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge 
without the assent of his parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. 
Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reasons of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the 
beginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of 
the first year. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay 
a tuition fee of $300 in two installments: $150 at the beginning of the first year and 
$150 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma only pay a tuition of $150 for the entire course, at the beginning of 
the first year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing (see page 14 for classification). The cost of the 
college study preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend 
entirely upon the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $ 10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 150 150 150 

Second tuition 150 150 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 

Five sessions ... 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 

$370 $380 $210 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pro- 
vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

Experience has proven $10 a month to be the minimum amount necessary for 
personal expenses, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student nurses in this school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room B-463, exten- 
sion 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other student supplies. 
In addition, it maintains theater and travel bureaus and facilities for cashing checks. 
Substantial savings are effected whenever manufacturers and publishers permit. The 
store is open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is excellent, 
and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships 
are not open to students until they have been in the School for six months. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by 
the Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which 
the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. She 
thus becomes a member of the American Nurses' Association and is eligible for 
membership in the American Red Cross Nursing Service. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held three times a year (January, May, and September) 
under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. After pass- 
ing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse 
(R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center are eligible for registration. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 
periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other 
activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, 
and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recrea- 
tional Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 

HEALTH 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 
All students have X-ray examinations of the chest at periodic intervals. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed to each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the eight months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

VACATION 

A vacation of four weeks is allowed each student twice during the three-year 
course (i.e., at the end of the first and the second years). To the student entering 
with eight months' credit for her college degree only one period of four weeks is 
allowed. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessities of the 
School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

Countless opportunities are open to registered professional nurses in different 
fields. The three traditional classifications — private duty, institutional, and public 
health nursing — must now be increased to include military nursing. 

Service with the Army or Navy Nurse Corps is rapidly becoming a primary ob- 
jective with young graduates who meet the rigid requirements. The needs of the 
military services are expanding so fast that numerical statements cannot be kept 
up to date. Registered professional nurses have the rank of second lieutenant on 
joining the Army Nurse Corps, and are eligible for promotion with increased re- 
sponsibility, a fact in which all graduates of our school take pride because of Miss 
Maxwell's untiring efforts to s.ecure this recognition. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in 
general duty, advancing into head nurse, supervisory, or teaching positions as their 
experience and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who 
wish to specialize in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, 
psychiatry, orthopedics, or anesthesia. 

While the demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hos- 
pital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more im- 
portant. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of 
her vocation in private duty may make a real contribution, not only in nursing care, 
but also in health teaching. The private duty nurse has a wide influence upon the 
prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school 
and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare 
themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or 
in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the civilian hospi- 
tal wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the industrial 
plant or the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility 
and honor. She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public 
health officer, the industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with govern- 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

mental and voluntary relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the 
community. It seems probable that American nurses will have a large share of re- 
sponsibility in restoring health and welfare services in many parts of the world after 
the war, and that their opportunities for service will increase rather than diminish, 
both at home and abroad. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and 
study hall are located in this building. There are ten bedroom floors, accommodating 
350 student. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort has 
been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence 
during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 14.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study, and 
practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day including the time spent in the classrooms. On Sunday and one other 
day each week the time on duty is limited to six hours. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block 
system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, where 
the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one case study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient department 
of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during her 
two-months service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to a 
special instructor. Field trips to various welfare agencies and institutions are 
arranged. 

Two weeks of observation of public health nursing with the Henry Street Visit- 
ing Nurse Service is part of every student's experience. During this period, attention 
is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health serv- 
ice, and the function of the public health nurse is interpreted, both in action and in 
conferences. 

A three-months affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

A three-months affiliation in communicable disease nursing is given at Willard 
Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of students annually. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching 
purposes. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available 
for instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia 
University is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Bacteriology. Thirty hours. Professors Thompson and Culbertson and Miss 
Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steri- 
lization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. Stetten 
and Miss Gill. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of 
simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the 
apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A 
study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, 
pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of the drugs are 
included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Phillips. 

Discussion of the necessity of studying how to live ; the place of recreation in life ; the essentials 
of physical hygiene ; and the importance of mental attitudes in maintaining a well-balanced life. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Phillips. 

An orientation course in activities to assist the student to select an activity that she will enjoy 
continuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective 
after the Winter Session. Swimming, tennis, dancing, and gymnasium games such as volley ball, 
paddle tennis, handball, and ping-pong are offered for class work and recreation. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Harrell. 

An elementary course in the relation of sanitary conditions to health, with emphasis on public 
health education. This course runs parallel to bacteriology. Some of the topics discussed are: water 
supply, disposal of waste, and control of milk and food supplies. 

Lectures, class discussion, and excursions to the American Museum of Natural History, Sheffield 
Farms Model Dairy at Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, and the New York City Department of Health. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Stephenson and Miss Hogden. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Vanderbilt, Miss Pettit, and Miss Pedeflous. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital economics. Thirty-five hours. Miss Pettit and Miss Wells. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to effi- 
ciency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing 
systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose 
and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution of linen and 
surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. Miss Pedeflous. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Fifteen hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its physio- 
logical effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local massage, 
and observation in the physical therapy clinic. 



SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Curtis and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Elliott and Professor Lee. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demon- 
strations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics 
held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Caughey and Sproul. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course is 
closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Bruenn and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Stephenson. 

This course is correlated with the courses in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt, Miss Pettit, 
and Miss Pedeflous. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are dem- 
onstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in the class- 
room as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human 
behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic and impersonal understanding of the 
motives of conduct with particular application to nursing. 



SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Montgomery. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Professor Cahill and staff. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Babcock. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and 
throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Wheeler and Miss Shaw. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases and 
their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: the 
equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used 
in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. Miss Pedeflous. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical emergencies, 
including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and camp as well as in daily 
life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are emphasized. The course is based on 
courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for pre- 
ventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by 
nurse instructors. 



Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tra- 
ditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which 
have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects cer- 
tain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demonstration and 
discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to prepare the student nurse to meet 
situations in nursing outside the hospital, using such equipment as is found in a home. 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Miss Young and Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

THIRD YEAR 



Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. 



Lecture and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instructor, given 
at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center, comprise this course. 
This instruction is coincident with clinical experience on the obstetrical service. 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal condi- 
tions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

This course is coincident with clinical experience on the pediatric service. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, stating 
their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the student nurse 
to the varied branches of nursing in order that she may select with greater intelligence the particular 
field in which she is likely to find the greatest interest and success. 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 






Columbia University 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



Forty-third Series, No. 23 



May 22, 1943 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 

i943- J 944 










MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 



Columbia 1Hnibtx$itp ^Bulletin of information 

Forty-third Series, No. 23 May 22, 1943 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York, N. Y., weekly from mid- 
December for thirty-six consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter December 13, 
1941, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1 103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized. 

These include the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the Announcements of the 
several Colleges and Schools and of certain Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as 
circumstances require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon 
application to the Secretary of the University. 
C. U. P. 6,000 — 1943 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York City. 



PUBLISHED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




Harold Haiiday Costain 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 

i943" I 944 




MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, B.S., M.D Assistant Dean and Secretary 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Hugh Auchincloss 
George Francis Cahill 
William Edgar Caldwell 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
Kenneth Stewart Cole 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
John Hughes Dunnington 
Earl Theron Engle 
George Winthrop Fish 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
Franklin McCue Hanger 
Michael Heidelberger 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
Frederick Brown Humphreys 
James Wesley Jobling 
John Devereux Kernan 
Homer Davies Kesten 
Albert Richard Lamb 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Charles Christian Lieb 
Vernon William Lippard 
Robert Frederick Loeb 



Walter Gay Lough 

CONSTANTINE JOSEPH MacGuIRE, Jr. 

Rustin McIntosh 

George Miller MacKee 

Ward J. MacNeal 

Howard Harris Mason 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Dudley Joy Morton 

Michael George Mulinos 

Clay Ray Murray 

Harry Stoll Mustard 

Reuben Ottenberg 

Walter Walker Palmer 

Alwyn Max Pappenheimer 

1 William Barclay Parsons 

Tracy Jackson Putnam 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Henry Alsop Riley 

Thomas H. Russell 

Fordyce Barker St. John 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 

Alan de Forest Smith 

Philip Edward Smith 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

Phillips Thygeson 

Benjamin Philp Watson 

Randolph West 

Allen Oldfather Whipple 

William Henry Woglom 

Isaac Ogden Woodruff 

1 Irving Sherwood Wright 



^n leave 1943-1944. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 
OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret ,E. Conrad, R.N Professor of Nursing and Executive Officer 

of the Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Assistant Prof essor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 



Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Beatrice H. Brimley, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1935 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1938. 

Helen Christensen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1023. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Marian A. Fuller, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Ruth D. Galloway, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1939; B.S., Columbia, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1942. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Hazel Goure Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Colorado, 1932. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Harriet C. Heffernan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Corinne G. Hogden Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Cincinnati, 1954. 

Elsie Marie Hubbs, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hunter, 1938; B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1941. 

Ann A. Kirchnek, R.N Instructor in N ursin g 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937. 

Katherine B. Lewis, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942. 

Dorothy D. Nayer, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937 ; A.M., 1942. 

Ethel F. Nord, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 ; A.B., Hunter, 1941. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Elizabeth E. Schill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

Emily J. Simonson, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1938. 

Ina A. Voelker, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wartburg, 1937 ; M.N., Western Reserve, 1941. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; A.M., 
Columbia, 1941-. 

Helen P. Wood, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; A.M., 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Alice L. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, School of Nursing, Vancouver Hospital, 1918 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 



ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

BACTERIOLOGY 
James T. Culbertson, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

CHEMISTRY 

De Witt Stetten, Jr., M.D., Ph.D Instructor in Biochemistry 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

MATERIA MEDICA 
Sidney C. Werner, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

NURSING 
Communicable Diseases 

Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 
William J. Greenfield, A.B., M.D Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Assistant Attending Surgeon in Otolaryngology, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 
Maynard C. Wheeler, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Associate in Ophthalmology 

Assistant Attending Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Gynecological Nursing 
Charles M. Steer, A.B., M.D 

Resident Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 
Harry M. Rose, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Medical Nursing Clinics 
George A. Perera, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Resident Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Obstetrical Nursing 
Agnes Wilson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Assistant Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. aj} d Gynecology 

C. Lee Buxton, B.S., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Jean Corwin, A.M., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Associate Attending Physician, Obstetrician, and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D. . . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Associate Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. an d Gynecology 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service, Babies Hospital. 

Conrad Riley, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Resident in Pediatrics, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Senior Psychiatrist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 

Surgical Nursing 

Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Surgical Nursing Clinics 

Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Charles H. C. Beakes, B.S., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Assistant Resident in Surgery, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clay Ray Murray, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Attending Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Urological Nursing 
Ralph C. Yeaw, A.B., M.D Instructor in Urology 

Assistant Urologist, Babies Hospital. 

Assistant Surgeon in Urology, Presbyterian Hospital. 



PATHOLOGY 

Edith E. Sproul, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Assistant Attending Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Clinical Pathology 

John L. Caughey, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Harry M. Rose, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . . . Educational Director, School Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Provost of the Utiiversity 

Henry M. Schley, B.S Comptroller 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M. . . . Director of University Admissions (absent on leave) 

L. Carrington Goodrich, Ph.D Acting Director of University Admissions 

Carl M. White, Ph.D Director of Libraries 

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Rev. Stephen Fielding Bayne, Jr., S.T.M Chaplain of the University 

Edward S. Elliott, M.D Director of Athletics 

Benjamin A. Hubbard, Ph.B Director of King's Crown Activities 

William H. McCastline, M.D University Medical Officer 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S Director of University Residence Halls 

Robert F. Moore, A.B Secretary of Appointments (absent on leave) 

Mary A. Wegener Acting Secretary of Appointments 

Clarence E. Lovejoy, A.M Alumni Secretary 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frederick Miller, C.E Assistant Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Thomas P. Fleming, M.S Librarian 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N., A.M. . . Director of Residence, Department of Nursing 




LEARNING TO GIVE MEDICINES UNDER CAREFUL SUPERVISION 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Dean Sage, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Vice-President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

John F. Bush, Executive Vice-President 

Matthew C. Fleming, Secretary 
John W. Hornor, Assistant Secretary 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 
Benjamin Strong, Assistant Treasurer 

Managers 

Malcolm P. Aldrich Charles E. Adams 

Mrs. Edward S. Harkness Thatcher M. Brown 

John W. Hornor William E. S. Griswold 

Mrs. Yale Kneeland G. Hermann Kinnicutt 

Duncan H. Read David M. Look 

Dean Sage, Jr. Dunlevy Milbank 

William Williams William E. Stevenson 

Cornelius R. Agnew Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 

Charles P. Cooper Carll Tucker 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison Henry C. Alexander 

John I. Downey Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 

William Hale Harkness Robert W. Carle 

Dean Sage Hugh J. Chisholm 

F. Louis Slade Johnston deForest 

Benjamin Strong Matthew C. Fleming 

Walter E. Hope 
Charles S. Munson 

Ex-Officio 

Henry Evertson Cobb, D.D. J. V. Moldenhawer, D.D. 

L. Humphrey Walz 

Nursing Committee 

G. Hermann Kinnicutt, Chairman 
Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 

Miss Marie Byron Dean Sage 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison Benjamin P. Watson, M.D. 

Mrs. Frederic F. de Rham Allen O. Whipple, M.D. 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. Mrs. Staunton Williams 

Mrs. Harry N. French 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S., Columbia, 1933. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospital, 
offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital was 
founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the establishment 
of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and nursing 
care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Uni- 
versity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 168th 
Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness 
and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and 
the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmol- 
ogy was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Faculty. 
This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of the University and 
the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the School of 
Nursing. Two thousand and twenty-five nurses have graduated here in this half 
century. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the funda- 
mental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped 
laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general 
and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community 
in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient department and in 
visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to 
acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing 
profession. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The student today must choose her occupation from a bewildering number of 
possibilities. Nursing has always held an enviable position among them, but this is 
especially true since we entered the war. Nurses in the United States have adapted 
the slogan of their British sisters: "Nursing — your War Work with a Future." It 
states concisely an important fact for the young woman who is seriously concerned 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

about investing her energy and effort where they will be most effective in these 
critical times. 

In an era when a strong emphasis on destruction is inevitable, nursing offers con- 
structive activity with health as a positive goal. Probably no one would question the 
truth of Mr. Walter Lippmann's recent statement, "Health is the greatest single 
asset of an individual or a nation." The necessity of skillful, intelligent nursing care 
and the maintenance of health services is universally recognized and is constantly 
increasing. In civilian and military hospitals, professional nurses are a vital imme- 
diate necessity. 

The need for the services of skilled professional nurses will not diminish when 
the war is over. American nurses must be ready for the tremendous responsibilities 
of reconstruction and rehabilitation. 

There is a widespread impression that the young woman who enters a school of 
nursing is postponing the date of her usefulness for two or three years. Nothing 
could be farther from the truth. In most schools of nursing, students are assigned to 
part-time duty on the wards after a very few months. They begin at once to relieve 
other nursing personnel for the more important duties requiring greater experience, 
at home or abroad. The student nurse, therefore, begins her professional usefulness 
almost immediately. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly: 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical 
defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to men- 
tion may be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements vary with the school. Advice about courses which should 
be included in the educational program before entrance should be secured from the 
schools of nursing, which will welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates 
well in advance of the date of entrance. All schools expect evidence of real intelli- 
gence and academic achievement. 

Any opportunity for testing one's ability to carry responsibility and to work har- 
moniously with others should be used, whether at home, school, college, or in 
volunteer work in community welfare organizations. Many of the courses offered 
by the American Red Cross, such as those in home nursing, first aid, and the eighty- 
hour course for volunteer nurses' aides, present practical "worksamples" of nursing. 
They furnish an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for nursing, and the 
seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION . 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and 
must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal 
application in writing on the blanks supplied by the School. After the application has 
been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from high school 
should present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of 
their school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no 
such specific requirement is made for college students, preference is always given 
to those who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. This form is known as the nurse student qualifying certificate 
application and is furnished by the Department to the School of Nursing. All neces- 
sary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physi- 
cal examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of 
the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time 
of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, 
therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experience in medical, surgical, 
obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following classi- 
fications: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as 
for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and 
sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well 
as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this 
basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is 
frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or university else- 
where and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, 
including those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements 
outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualifying 
certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should be ap- 
proved by the University before final selections are made. Applicants should there- 
fore communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing two 
years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a 
degree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated 
student of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health 
as well as on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 
tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, i unit; history, i unit; civics, V2 unit; electives, 7V2 units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics). The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in this Department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserve powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge 
without the assent of his parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. 
Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reasons of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the 
beginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of 
the first year. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Eachelor of Science pay 
a tuition fee of $300 in two installments: $150 at the beginning of the first year and 
$150 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma only pay a tuition of $150 for the entire course, at the beginning of 
the first year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing (see page 14 for classification). The cost of the 
college study preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend 
entirely upon the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $ 10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 150 150 150 

Second tuition 150 150 ... 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 

Five sessions ... 50 5° 

Degree application 20 20 

$370 $380 $210 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pro- 
vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied bv the Hospital. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Fifteen dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student 
nurses in this school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room B-463, exten- 
sion 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other student supplies. 
In addition, it maintains theater and travel bureaus and facilities for cashing checks. 
Substantial savings are effected whenever manufacturers and publishers permit. 
The store is open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students 
whose record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is 
excellent, and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These 
scholarships are not open to students until they have been in the School for six 
months. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by 
the Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which 
the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. She 
thus becomes a member of the American Nurses' Association and is eligible for 
membership in the American Red Cross Nursing Service. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held three times a year (January, May, and September) 
under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. After pass- 
ing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse 
(R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center are eligible for registration. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 
periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other 
activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, 
and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recrea- 
tional Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnasdcs, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 

HEALTH 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 
All students have X-ray examinations of the chest at periodic intervals. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all time lost for anv other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed to each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the eight months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 



C OH 'II. I A UNI VERS1 TV 



VACATION 



A vacation of four weeks is allowed each student twice during the three-year 
course (i.e., at the end of the first and the second years). To the student entering 
with eight months' credit for her college degree only one period of four weeks is 
allowed. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessities of the 
School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

Countless opportunities are open to registered professional nurses in different 
fields. The three traditional classifications — private duty, institutional, and public 
health nursing — must now be increased to include military nursing. 

Service with the Army or Navy Nurse Corps is rapidly becoming a primary ob- 
jective with young graduates who meet the rigid requirements. The needs of the 
military services are expanding so fast that numerical statements cannot be kept 
up to date. Registered professional nurses have the rank of second lieutenant on 
joining the Army Nurse Corps, and are eligible for promotion with increased re- 
sponsibility, a fact in which all graduates of our school take pride because of Miss 
Maxwell's untiring efforts to secure this recognition. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in 
general duty, advancing into head nurse, supervisory, or teaching positions as their 
experience and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who 
wish to specialize in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstet- 
rics, psychiatry, orthopedics, or anesthesia. 

While the demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hos- 
pital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more im- 
portant. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of 
her vocation in private duty may make a real contribution, not onlv in nursing care, 
but also in health teaching. The private duty nurse has a wide influence upon the 
prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school 
and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare 
themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or 
in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the civilian hospi- 
tal wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the industrial 
plant or the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility 
and honor. She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public 
health officer, the industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with govern- 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

mental and voluntary relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the 
community. It seems probable that American nurses will have a large share of re- 
sponsibility in restoring health and welfare services in many parts of the world after 
the war, and that their opportunities for service will increase rather than diminish, 
both at home and abroad. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and 
study hall are located in this building. There are ten bedroom floors, accommodat- 
ing 350 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort 
has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living 
conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the resi- 
dence during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 14.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study, and 
practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day including the time spent in the classrooms. On Sunday and one other 
day each week the time on duty is limited to six hours. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block 
system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, 
where the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one case study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient department 
of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during her 
two-months service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to a 
special instructor. Field trips to various welfare agencies and insdtutions are 
arranged. 

Two weeks of observation of public health nursing with the Henry Street Visit- 
ing Nurse Service is part of every student's experience. During this period, attention 
is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health serv- 
ice, and the function of the public health nurse is interpreted, both in action and in 
conferences. 

A three-months affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

A three-months affiliation in communicable disease nursing is given at Willard 
Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of students annually. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching 
purposes. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of medicine are available 
for instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia 
University is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Bacteriology. Thirty hours. Professor Culbertson and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steri- 
lization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. Stetten 
and Miss Gill. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of 
simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the 
apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A 
study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, 
pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of the drugs are 
included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. 

Discussion of the necessity of studying how to live ; the place of recreation in life ; the essentials 
of physical hygiene ; and the importance of mental attitudes in maintaining a well-balanced life. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. 

An orientation course in activities to assist the student to select an activity that she will enjoy 
continuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective 
after the Winter Session. Swimming, tennis, dancing, and gymnasium games such as volley ball, 
paddle tennis, handball, and ping-pong are offered for class work and recreation. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Voelker. 

An elementary course in the relation of sanitary conditions to health, with emphasis on public 
health education. This course runs parallel to bacteriology. Some of the topics discussed are: water 
supply, disposal of waste, and control of milk and food supplies. 

Lectures, class discussion, and excursions to the American Museum of Natural History, Sheffield 
Farms Model Dairy at Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, and the New York City Department of Health. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Hogden and Miss Goure. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foodi 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Vanderbilt, Miss Pettit, Miss Lewis, and Miss Galloway. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital economics. Thirty-five hours. Miss Pettit. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to effi- 
ciency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing 
systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose 
and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution of linen and 
surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. Miss Galloway. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Fifteen hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its physio- 
logical effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local massage, 
and observation in the physical therapy clinic. 



SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Rose and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Elliott and Professor Lee. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demon- 
strations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics 
held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Caughey and Sproul. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course is 
closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Werner and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
c.'fect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Hogden. 

This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt, Miss Pettit, 
Miss Lewis, and Miss Galloway. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are dem- 
onstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in the class- 
room as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human 
behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic understanding of the motives of conduct 
with particular application to nursing. 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Steer. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Yeaw. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Greenfield. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and 
throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Wheeler and Miss Fuller. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases and 
their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: the 
equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used 
in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. Miss Galloway. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical emergencies, 
including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and camp as well as in daily 
life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are emphasized. The course is based on 
courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for pre- 
ventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by 
nurse instructors. 



Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tra- 
ditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have, molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aimjjf this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which 
have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Vanderbilt. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects cer- 
tain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demonstration and 
discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to prepare the student nurse to meet 
situations in nursing outside the hospital, using such equipment as is found in a home. 

Ethics of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

THIRD YEAR 
Obstetric nursing. Forty -five hours. 

Lecture and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instructor, given 
at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center, comprise this course. 
This instruction is coincident with clinical experience on the obstetrical sen-ice. 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal condi- 
tions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

This course is coincident with clinical experience on the pediatric service. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, stating 
their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the student nurse 
to the varied branches of nursing. Special emphasis is placed on the international aspects of nursing, 
and on the effect of the war on nursing activities. 




£ a 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



Columbia University 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

Forty-fourth Series, No. 33 July 22, 1944 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1944-1945 







«EDICAt LIBRARY COLUMBIA W 

CO 

M E DICAL CENTER 

620 WEST l68TH STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Columtria SUnibersittp ^Bulletin of information 

Forty-fourth Series, No. 33 July 22, 1944 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly from mid- 
December for thirty-eight consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter October 4, 
1943, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 191 2. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 191 7, 
authorized. 

These include the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the Announcements of the 
several Colleges and Schools and of certain Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as 
circumstances require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon 
application to the Secretary of the University. 
C. U. P. 6,000 — 1944 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 



PUBLISHED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 







Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




Harold Haliday Costain 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1944-1945 




M E DICAL CENTER 

620 WEST l68TH STREET 

N EW YORK 32, N. Y. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, B.S., M.D Assistant Dean and Secretary 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. . . Assistant Dean and Secretary 

George H. Humphreys, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Dean 

(Postgraduate Studies in Medicine) 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Hugh Auchincloss 
George Francis Cahill 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
^Kenneth Stewart Cole 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
John Hughes Dunnington 
Earl Theron Engle 
George Winthrop Fish 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
Franklin McCue Hanger 
Michael Heidelberger 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
Frederick Brown Humphreys 
James Wesley Jobling 
John Devereux Kernan 
Homer Davies Kesten 
Albert Richard Lamb 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Vernon William Lippard 
Robert Frederick Loeb 
Walter Gay Lough 



Constantine Joseph MacGuire, Jr. 

Rustin McIntosh 

George Miller MacKee 

Ward J. MacNeal 

Howard Harris Mason 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Dudley Joy Morton 

Clay Ray Murray 

Harry Stoll Mustard 

Reuben Ottenberg 

Walter Walker Palmer 

Alwyn Max Pappenheimer 

^William Barclay Parsons 

Tracy Jackson Putnam 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Henry Alsop Riley 

Thomas H. Russell 

Fordyce Barker St. John 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 

Alan de Forest Smith 

Philip Edward Smith 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

Phillips Thygeson 

Benjamin Philp Watson 

Randolph West 

Allen Oldfather Whipple 

Willliam Henry Woglom 

Isaac Ogden Woodruff 

1 Irving Sherwood Wright 



1 On leave 1944-1:945. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Professor of Nursing and Executive Officer 

of the Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932 ; A.M., 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., RadclifFe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1925 ; B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; A.M., 1934. 



Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Beatrice Moore Brimley, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1935 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1938. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia, i94r. 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Josephine Hallinan Finan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Marion A. Fuller, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing. 1939. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Hazel Goure Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Colorado, 1932. 

Alice W. Hamilton, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Corinne G. Hogden Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Cincinnati, 1934. 

Ann A. Kirchner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937 ; A.M., 1942. 

Mary Louise Bogert Link, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Pembroke, 1940; B.S., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1943- 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942. 

Dorothy Daubert Nayer, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937 ; A.M., 1942. 

Ethel F. Nord, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 ; A.B., Hunter, 1941. 

Elizabeth E. Schill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; A.M., 
Columbia, 1941. 

Delphine Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen P. Wood, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; A.M., 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 



Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 190. 

BACTERIOLOGY 
James T. Culbertson, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

CHEMISTRY 

De Witt Stetten, Jr., M.D., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biochemistry' 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 
MATERIA MEDICA 

Sidney C. Werner, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 

Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 

William J. Greenfield, A.B., M.D Instructor iti Otolaryngology 

Assistant Attending Surgeon in Otolaryngology, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 

Maynard C. Wheeler, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . . Assistant Clinical Professor 
Assistant Attending Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. j OphthahnoloPV 

Gynecological Nursing 

William V. Cavanagh, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 

Harry M. Rose, A.B., M.D Associate in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Obstetrical Nursing 
Agnes Wilson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Assistant Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D. . . . Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. an( J GvnecoloPV 

Saul B. Gusberg, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Resident Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Jean Corwin, A.M., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Associate Attending Physician, Obstetrician, and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING y 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D. . . . Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 
Associate Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. ana \ Gynecology 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service, Babies Hospital. 

Alberta Parker, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Resident in Pediatrics, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Clinical Director, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 

Surgical Nursing 

Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.ScD. . . Instructor in Surgery 
Assistant Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Urological Nursing 

Ralph C. Yeaw, A.B., M.D Instructor in Urology 

Assistant Urologist, Babies Hospital. 

Assistant Surgeon in Urology, Presbyterian Hospital. 

PATHOLOGY 

Edith E. Sproul, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Assistant Attending Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clinical Pathology 

Abbie I. Knowlton, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Assistant Resident in Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Katherine Smull, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Assistant Resident in Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital. 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . . . Educational Director, School Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Provost of the University 

Henry M. Schley, B.S Comptroller 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M. . . . Director of University Admissions (absent on leave) 
L. Carrington Goodrich, Ph.D Acting Director of University Admissions 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Carl M. White, Ph.D Director of Libraries 

Edward }. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Rev. Stephen Fielding Bayne, Jr., S.T.M Chaplain of the University 

(absent on leave) 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S Director of University Residence Halls 

Clarence E. Lovejoy, A.M Alumni Secretary 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frederick Miller, C.E Assistant Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Thomas P. Fleming, M.S •. Librarian 



Eula W. Rathbun Director of Recreation, Department of Nursing 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925. 




LEARNING TO GIVE MEDICINES UNDER CAREFUL SUPERVISION 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 



OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

John F. Bush, Assistant to President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice-President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

John S. Parke, Executive Vice-President 

Matthew C. Fleming, Secretary 

Thatcher M. Brown, Jr., Assistant Secretary 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Assistant Treasurer 



Charles E. Adams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Thatcher M. Brown 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston deForest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
Matthew C. Fleming 
Willliam E. S. Griswold, Sr. 
W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 



Managers 

Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 
Willliam Hale Harkness 
Walter E. Hope 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
David M. Look 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Charles S. Munson 
Duncan H. Read 
Dean Sage, Jr. 
Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
F. Louis Slade 
William E. Stevenson 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
Willliam J. Wardall 
William Williams 



Honorary Members 

Edgar F. Romig, D.D. J. V. Moldenhawer, D.D. 

L. Humphrey Walz 

Nursing Committee 

Henry C. Alexander, Chairman 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham Miss Winifred Kaltenbach 

Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown Willard C. Rappleye, M.D. 

Miss Marie C. Byron Rustin McIntosh, M.D. 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 

Mrs. Harry N. French Benjamin P. Watson, M.D. 

Mrs. G. Hermann Kinnicutt Allen O. Whipple, M.D. 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad Mrs. Staunton Williams 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Helen Young, R.N. . . Director of Nursing Emeritus 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1. 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S., Columbia, 1933. 

Phyllis M. Young Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; A.M., Columbia, 
1943- 






HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospital, 
offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital was 
founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the establishment 
of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and nursing 
care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Uni- 
versity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 168th 
Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness 
and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and 
the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmol- 
ogy was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Faculty. 
This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of the University and 
the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the School of 
Nursing. Two thousand and twenty-five nurses have graduated here in this half 
century. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the funda- 
mental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped 
laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general 
and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community 
in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient department and in 
visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to 
acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing 
profession. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The student today must choose her occupation from a bewildering number of 
possibilities. Nursing has always held an enviable position among them, but this is 
especially true since we entered the war. Nurses in the United States have adopted 
the slogan of their British sisters: "Nursing — your War Work with a Future." It 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

states concisely an important fact for the young woman who is seriously concerned 
about investing her energy and effort where they will be most effective in these 
critical times. 

In an era when a strong emphasis on destruction is inevitable, nursing offers con- 
structive activity with health as a positive goal. Probably no one would question the 
truth of Mr. Walter Lippmann's recent statement, "Health is the greatest single 
asset of an individual or a nation." The necessity of skillful, intelligent nursing care 
and the maintenance of health services is universally recognized and is constantly 
increasing. In civilian and military hospitals, professional nurses are a vital imme- 
diate necessity. 

The need for the services of skilled professional nurses will not diminish when 
the war is over. American nurses must be ready for the tremendous responsibilities 
of reconstruction and rehabilitation. 

There is a widespread impression that the young woman who enters a school of 
nursing is postponing the date of her usefulness for two or three years. Nothing 
could be farther from the truth. In most schools of nursing, students are assigned to 
part-time duty on the wards after a very few months. They begin at once to relieve 
other nursing personnel for the more important duties requiring greater experience, 
at home or abroad. The student nurse, therefore, begins her professional usefulness 
almost immediately. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly: 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical 
defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to men- 
tion may be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements vary with the school. Advice about courses which should 
be included in the educational program before entrance should be secured from the 
schools of nursing, which will welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates 
well in advance of the date of entrance. All schools expect evidence of real intelli- 
gence and academic achievement. 

Any opportunity for testing one's ability to carry responsibility and to work har- 
moniously with others should be used, whether at home, school, college, or in 
volunteer work in community welfare organizations. Many of the courses offered 
by the American Red Cross, such as those in home nursing, first aid, and the eighty- 
hour course for volunteer nurses' aides, present practical "worksamples" of nursing. 
They furnish an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for nursing, and the 
seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 



THE NURSING COURSE 
ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and 
must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal 
application in writing on the blanks supplied by the School. After the application has 
been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from high school 
should present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of 
their school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no 
such specific requirement is made for college students, preference is always given 
to those who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. This form is known as the nurse student qualifying certificate 
application and is furnished by the Department to the School of Nursing. All neces- 
sary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physi- 
cal examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of 
the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time 
of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, 
therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

THE U. S. CADET NURSE CORPS 

Application may be made for membership in the U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps through 
the Department of Nursing. Government appropriations may be expected to cover 
tuition, university fee, uniforms, and a monthly stipend from enrollment to gradua- 
tion. The student must pledge in return for these benefits to give her services for the 
duration of the war in essential military or civilian nursing service. It is understood 
that the basic services required for state licensing examinations will be completed in 
thirty months and that clinical assignments will depend qn the needs of the country. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experience in medical, surgical. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essendally the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following classi- 
fications: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as 
for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and 
sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well 
as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this 
basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is 
frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or university else- 
where and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, 
including those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements 
outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualifying 
certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should be ap- 
proved by the University before final selections are made. Applicants should there- 
fore communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing two 
years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a 
degree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, i unit; history, i unit; civics^ V2 unit; electives, 7I4 units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics). The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

student of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health 
as well as on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 
tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in this Department. 



ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge 
without the assent of his parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. 
Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reasons of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the be- 
ginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of the 
first year. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay 
a tuition fee of $300 in two installments: $150 at the beginning of the first year and 
$150 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma pay a tuition fee of $200 in two installments: $100 at the beginning 
of the first year and $100 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing (see page 14 for classification). The cost of the 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

college study preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend 
entirely upon the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 150 150 100 

Second tuition 150 150 100 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 

Five sessions ... 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 

$370 $380 S260 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pro- 
vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately S50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Fifteen dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student 
nurses in this school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room B-463, exten- 
sion 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other student supplies. 
In addition, it maintains a travel bureau and facilities for cashing checks. Substantial 
savings are effected whenever manufacturers and publishers permit. The store is 
open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students 
whose record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is 
excellent, and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These 
scholarships are not open to students until they have been in the School for six 
months. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended bv 
the Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which 
the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. She 
thus becomes a member of the American Nurses' Association and is eligible for 
membership in the American Red Cross Nursing Service. 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held four times a year (January, April, July, and October) 
under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. After pass- 
ing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse 
(R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center are eligible for registration. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 
periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other 
activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, 
and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recrea- 
tional Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



HEALTH 



The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 
All students have X-ray examinations of the chest at periodic intervals. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitiously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed to each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the eight months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 

VACATION 

A vacation of four weeks is allowed each student twice during die three-year 
course (i.e., at the end of the first and the second years). To the student entering 
with eight months' credit for her college degree only one period of four weeks is 
allowed. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessities of the 
School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 



CAREERS IN NURSING 

Countless opportunities are open to registered professional nurses in different 
fields. The three traditional classifications — private duty, institutional, and public 
health nursing — must now be increased to include military nursing. 

Service with the Army or Navy Nurse Corps is rapidly becoming a primary ob- 
jective with young graduates who meet the rigid requirements. The needs of the 
military services are expanding so fast that numerical statements cannot be kept 
up to date. Registered professional nurses have the rank of second lieutenant on 
joining the Army Nurse Corps and of ensign on joining the Navy Nurse Corps, and 
are eligible for promotion with increased responsibility, a fact in which all graduates 
of our school take pride because of Miss Maxwell's untiring efforts to secure this 
recognition. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in 
general duty, advancing into head nurse, supervisory, or teaching positions as their 
experience and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

wish to specialize in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstet- 
rics, psychiatry, orthopedics, or anesthesia. 

While the demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hos- 
pital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more im- 
portant. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of 
her vocation in private duty may make a real contribution, not only in nursing care, 
but also in health teaching. The private duty nurse has a wide influence upon the 
prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school 
and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare 
themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or 
in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the civilian hospi- 
tal wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the industrial 
plant or the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility 
and honor. She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public 
health officer, the industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with govern- 
mental and voluntary relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the 
community. It seems probable that American nurses will have a large share of re- 
sponsibility in restoring health and welfare services in many parts of the world after 
the war, and that their opportunities for service will increase rather than diminish, 
both at home and abroad. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and 
study hall are located in this building. There are ten bedroom floors, accommodat- 
ing 350 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort 
has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living 
conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the resi- 
dence hall during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of diree years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 14.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study, and 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and pracd- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day including the time spent in the classrooms. On Sunday and one other 
day each week the time on duty is limited to six hours. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the dme spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacadons, the outline of the block 
system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, 
where the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one nursing care study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient department 
of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during her 
two-months service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to a 
special instructor. Field trips to various welfare agencies and institutions are ar- 
ranged. 

Two weeks of observation of public health nursing with the Henry Street Visit- 
ing Nurse Service is part of every student's experience. During this period, attention 
is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health serv- 
ice, and the function of the public health nurse is interpreted, both in action and in 
conferences. 

A three-months affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

A three-months affiliation in communicable disease nursing is given at Willard 
Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of students annually. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching 
purposes. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available 
for instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia 
University is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Bacteriology. Thirty hours. Professor Culbertson and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steri- 
lization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. Stetten 
and Miss Gill. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of 
simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the 
apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A 
study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, 
pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of the drugs are 
included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Rathbun. 

A discussion of recreation, relaxation, study and work schedules, mental attitudes, and personal 
hygiene essentials for the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health as a factor in balanced, 
successful living. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Rathbun. 

An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk danc- 
ing, team sports, and hiking: to assist the student to select an activity which she will enjoy pursuing. 
Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective after the winter 
session. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Wilde. 

An elementary course in the relation of sanitary conditions to health, with emphasis on public 
health education. This course runs parallel to bacteriology. Some of the topics discussed are: water 
supply, disposal of waste, and control of milk and food supplies. 

Lectures, class discussion, and field trips to the New York City Department of Health, Henry 
Street Visiting Nurse Association, and various housing projects in New York City. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Hogden and Miss Goure. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Pettit and Mrs. Link. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital economics. Thirty-five hours. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to effi- 
ciency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing 
systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose 
and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution of linen and 
surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. Mrs. Link. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Fifteen hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its physio- 
logical effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local massage, 
and observation in the physical therapy clinic. 



SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Rose and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Elliott and Miss Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demon- 
strations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics 
held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Smull and Knowlton. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course is 
closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Werner and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Hocden. 

This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit and Mrs. Link. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are dem- 
onstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in the class- 
room as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human 
behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic understanding of the motives of conduct 
with particular application to nursing. 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Cavanaugh. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours Dr. Yeaw. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Greenfield. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and 
throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Wheeler and Miss Fuller. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases and 
their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: the 
equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used 
in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. Mrs. Link. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical emergencies, 
including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and camp as well as in daily 
life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are emphasized. The course is based on 
courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for pre- 
ventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by 
nurse instructors. 



Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 
Field trips are arranged to the Children's Court of Domestic Relations and institutions concerned 
with aspects of mental hygiene, mental illness, and rehabilitation. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tra- 
ditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which 
have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects cer- 
tain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demonstration and 
discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to prepare the student nurse to meet 
situations in nursing outside the hospital, using such equipment as is found in a home. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

THIRD YEAR 
Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

Lecture and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instructor, given 
at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center, comprise this course. 
This instruction is coincident with clinical experience on the obstetrical service. 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal condi- 
tions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

This course is coincident with clinical experience on the pediatric service. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, suiting 
their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the student nurse 
to the varied branches of nursing. Special emphasis is placed on the international aspects of nursing, 
and on the effect of the war on nursing activities. 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

FOR THE POOR OF NEW YORK 

WITHOUT RECARD TO 

RACE, CREED OR COLOR 

SUPPORTED BY 

VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



Columbia University 

BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



Forty-fifth Series, No. 27 



June 2, 1945 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 



I945-I946 




A ... 



iri"^ 




COLUMBIA PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST l68TH STREET 

NEW YORK 3 2, N. Y. 



Columbia <Umber£ttp bulletin of information 

Forty-fifth Series, No. 27 June 2, 1945 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly from 
December for forty-one consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter November 4, 
1944, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized. 

These include the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the Announcements of the 
several Colleges and Schools and of certain Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as 
circumstances require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon 
application to the Secretary of the University. 
C. U. P. 5,100 — 1945 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 



PUBLISHED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 







Harold Haliday Costain 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1945-1946 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 3 2, N. Y. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, B.S., M.D Associate Dean and Secretary 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. . . . Associate Dean and Secretary 

Harry Stoll Mustard, B.S., LL.D., M.D Associate Dean (Public Health) 

Bion R. East, D.D.S Associate Dean for Dental and Oral Surgery 

Margaret Elizabeth Conrad, A.B Associate Dean (Nursing) 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Hugh Auchincloss 
Charles Francis Bodecker 
George Francis Cahill 
A. Benson Cannon 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
x Kenneth Stewart Cole 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
Wilfred Monroe Copenhaver 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
John Hughes Dunnington 
Bion R. East 
Earl Theron Engle 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
Franklin McCue Hanger 
Michael Heidelberger 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
Earle Banks Hoyt 
John Devereux Kernan 
Albert Richard Lamb 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
1 Vernon William Lippard 
Robert Frederick Loeb 
Walter Gay Lough 
Donovan James McCune 



Constantine Joseph MacGuire, Jr. 

Rustin McIntosh 

George Miller MacKee 

Ward J. MacNeal 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Clay Ray Murray 

Harry Stoll Mustard 

Carl R. Oman 

Reuben Ottenberg 

Walter Walker Palmer 

1 William Barclay Parsons 

Tracy Jackson Putnam 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Henry Alsop Riley 

Thomas H. Russell 

Fordyce Barker St. John 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 

Alan de Forest Smith 

FIarry Pratt Smith 

Philip Edward Smith 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

William E. Studdiford, Jr. 

a PHILLIPS THYGESON 

Harry B. van Dyke 
Benjamin Philp Watson 
Randolph West 
Allen Oldfather Whipple 
William Henry Woglom 
Isaac Ogden Woodruff 
1 Irving Sherwood Wright 
Daniel E. Ziskin 



1 On leave 1945-1946. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N. . Associate Dean (Nursing), Professor of Nursing and 

Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932 ; A.M., 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1925 ; A.M., Colum- 
bia, 1934. 



Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Anna M. Bater, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, University of Rochester School of Nursing, 1941. 

Beatrice Moore Brimley, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1935 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1938. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Josephine Hallinan Finan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Hazel Goure Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Colorado, 1932. 

Alice W. Hamilton, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 
Doris Johnson Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Wisconsin, 1938. 

Ann A. Kirchner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937 ; A.M., 1942. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 

Elizabeth Schill MacQuigg, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942. 

Catherine T. Mulcahy, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hunter, 1938; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 ; B.S., Columbia, 
1941. 

Dorothy Daubert Nayer, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937 ; A.M., 1942. 

Ethel F. Nord, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 ; A.B., Hunter, 1941. 

Esther M. Olver, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; A.M., 
Columbia, 1941. 

Delphine Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen P. Wood, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; A.M., 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

BACTERIOLOGY 
James T. Culbertson, PhD Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

CHEMISTRY 
De Witt Stetten, Jr., M.D., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

MATERIA MEDICA 

Sidney C. Werner, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 
Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 
William J. Greenfield, A.B., M.D Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Assistant Attending Otolaryngologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 
Maynard C. Wheeler, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Clinical Professor 

Assistant Attending Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. j Ophthalmology 

Gynecological Nursing 

William V. Cavanagh, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 

Harry M. Rose, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Obstetrical Nursing 
Agnes G. Wilson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Assistant Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. an rf Gynecology 

Saul B. Gusberg, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Resident Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D. . . . Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 
Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. and GvnccoloPV 

Richard Van Dyke Knight, A.B., M.D. . Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Resident Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 
Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service and Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Alberta Parker, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Resident Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Clinical Director, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 

Surgical Nursing 
Robert H. Egerton Elliott, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . . Instructor in Surgery 

Assistant Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Urological Nursing 

Ralph C. Yeaw, A.B., M.D Instructor in Urology 

Assistant Urologist, Babies Hospital. 

Assistant Surgeon in Urology, Presbyterian Hospital. 



PATHOLOGY 
Edith E. Sproul, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Assistant Attending Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clinical Pathology 

Abbie I. Knowlton, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Assistant Resident in Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Katherine Smull, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Assistant Resident in Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital. 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . . . Educational Director, School Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Provost of the University 

Henry McA. Schley, B.S Comptroller 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M Director of University Admissions 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Carl M. White, Ph.D Director of Libraries 

Seymour Robb, A.B. in L.S Medical Librarian 

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Frederick Miller, C.E Assistant Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Rev. Stephen Fielding Bayne, Jr., S.T.M Chaplain of the University 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S Director of University Residence Halls 



Eula W. Rathbun Director of Recreation, Department of Nursing 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925. 




LEARNING TO GIVE MEDICINES UNDER CAREFUL SUPERVISION 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 



OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice-President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

John S. Parke, Executive Vice-President 

Matthew C. Fleming, Secretary 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Assistant Treasurer 



Charles E. Adams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Thatcher M. Brown 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston deForest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
Matthew C. Fleming 
William E. S. Griswold, Sr. 
W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 



Managers 

William Hale Harkness 
Walter E. Hope 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
David M. Look 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Charles S. Munson 
Duncan H. Read 
Dean Sage, Jr. 
Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
F. Louis Slade 
William E. Stevenson 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
William Williams 



Honorary Members 

Edgar F. Romig, D.D. J. V. Moldenhawer, D.D. 

L. Humphrey Walz 

Nursing Committee 

Henry C. Alexander, Chairman 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison, V ice-Chairman 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, V ice-Chairman 
Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown 
Miss Marie C. Byron 
Miss Margaret E. Conrad 
Mrs. Harry N. French 
Miss Winifred Kaltenbach 
Mrs. G. Hermann Kinnicutt 
Rustin McIntosh, M.D. 
Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 



Mrs. Stephen Philbin 
Tracy J. Putnam, M.D. 
wlllard c. rappleye, m.d. 
Mrs. Byron Stookey 
Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 
Benjamin P. Watson, M.D. 
Allen O. Whipple, M.D. 
Mrs. Staunton Williams 
John S. Parke, ex officio 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Helen Young, R.N Director of Nursing Emeritus 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R. N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

A. Winifred Kaltenbach, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1909 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S., Columbia, 1933. 

Phyllis M. Young Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; A.M., Columbia, 
1943. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospital, 
offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital was 
founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the establishment 
of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and nursing 
care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Uni- 
versity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present locadon, on 168th 
Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness 
and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and 
the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmol- 
ogy was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Faculty. 
This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of the University and 
the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the School of 
Nursing. Two thousand and twenty-five nurses have graduated here in this half 
century. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the funda- 
mental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped 
laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general 
and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community 
in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient department and in 
visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to 
acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing 
profession. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The student today must choose her occupation from a bewildering number of 
possibilities. Nursing has always held an enviable position among them, but this is 
especially true since we entered the war. Nurses in the United States have adopted 
the slogan of their British sisters: "Nursing — your War Work with a Future." It 
states concisely an important fact for the young woman who is seriously concerned 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

about investing her energy and effort where they will be most effective in these 
critical times. 

In an era when a strong emphasis on destruction is inevitable, nursing offers con- 
structive activity with health as a positive goal. Probably no one would question the 
truth of Mr. Walter Lippmann's recent statement, "Health is the greatest single 
asset of an individual or a nation." The necessity of skillful, intelligent nursing care 
and the maintenance of health services is universally recognized and is constantly 
increasing. In civilian and military hospitals, professional nurses are a vital imme- 
diate necessity. 

The need for the services of skilled professional nurses will not diminish when 
the war is over. American nurses must be ready for the tremendous responsibilities 
of reconstruction and rehabilitation. 

There is a widespread impression that the young woman who enters a school of 
nursing is postponing the date of her usefulness for two or three years. Nothing 
could be farther from the truth. In most schools of nursing, students are assigned to 
part-time duty on the wards after a very few months. They begin at once to relieve 
other nursing personnel for the more important duties requiring greater experience, 
at home or abroad. The student nurse, therefore, begins her professional usefulness 
almost immediately. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly: 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical 
defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to men- 
tion may be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements vary with the school. Advice about courses which should 
be included in the educational program before entrance should be secured from the 
schools of nursing, which will welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates 
well in advance of the date of entrance. All schools expect evidence of real intelli- 
gence and academic achievement. 

Any opportunity for testing one's ability to carry responsibility and to work har- 
moniously with others should be used, whether at home, school, college, or in 
volunteer work in community welfare organizations. Many of the courses offered 
by the American Red Cross, such as those in home nursing, first aid, and the eighty- 
hour course for volunteer nurses' aides, present practical "worksamples" of nursing. 
They furnish an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for nursing, and the 
seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and 
must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal 
application in writing on the blanks supplied by the School. After the application has 
been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from high school 
should present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of 
their school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no 
such specific requirement is made for college students, preference is always given 
to those who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. This form is known as the nurse student qualifying certificate 
application and is furnished by the Department to the School of Nursing. All neces- 
sary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physi- 
cal examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of 
the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time 
of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, 
therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

THE U. S. CADET NURSE CORPS 

Application may be made for membership in the U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps through 
the Department of Nursing. Government appropriations may be expected to cover 
tuition, university fee, uniforms, and a monthly stipend from enrollment to gradua- 
tion. The student must pledge in return for these benefits to give her services for the 
duration of the war in essential military or civilian nursing service. It is understood 
that the basic services required for state licensing examinations will be completed in 
thirty months and that clinical assignments will depend on the needs of the country. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experience in medical, surgical, 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following classi- 
fications: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as 
for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and 
sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well 
as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this 
basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is 
frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or university else- 
where and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, 
including those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements 
outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualifying 
certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should be ap- 
proved by the University before final selections are made. Applicants should there- 
fore communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing two 
years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a 
degree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, i unit; history, i unit; civics, J/2 unit; electives, 7V2 units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics) . The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

student of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health 
as well as on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 
tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions study in this Department. 



ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge 
without the assent of her parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. 
Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reason of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of f 10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the be- 
ginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of the 
first year. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay 
a tuition fee of $300 in two installments: $150 at the beginning of the first year and 
$150 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma pay a tuition fee of $200 in two installments: $100 at the beginning 
of the first year and $ 100 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing (see page 17 for classification). The cost of the 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

college study preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend 
entirely upon the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 150 150 100 

Second tuition 150 150 100 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 

Five sessions ... 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 ... 

$370 $380 $260 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pro- 
vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Fifteen dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student 
nurses in this school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room B-463, exten- 
sion 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other student supplies. 
In addition, it maintains a travel bureau and facilities for cashing checks. Substantial 
savings are effected whenever manufacturers and publishers permit. The store is 
open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students 
whose record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is 
excellent, and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These 
scholarships are not open to students until they have been in the School for six 
months. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by 
the Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which 
the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York. She 
thus becomes a member of the American Nurses' Association and is eligible for 
membership in the American Red Cross Nursing Service. 



GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held four times a year (January, April, July, and October) 
under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. After pass- 
ing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse 
(R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center are eligible for registration. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 
periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other 
activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, 
and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recrea- 
tional Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



HEALTH 



The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 
All students have X-ray examinations of the chest at periodic intervals. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitiously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the eight months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 

VACATION 

A vacation of four weeks is allowed each student twice during the three-year 
course (i.e., at the end of the first and second years). To the student entering 
with eight months' credit for her college degree only one period of four weeks is 
allowed. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessities of the 
School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

Countless opportunities are open to registered professional nurses in different 
fields. The three traditional classifications — private duty, institutional, and public 
health nursing — must now be increased to include military nursing. 

Service with the Army or Navy Nurse Corps is rapidly becoming a primary ob- 
jective with young graduates who meet the rigid requirements. The needs of the 
military services are expanding so fast that numerical statements cannot be kept 
up to date. Registered professional nurses have the rank of second lieutenant on 
joining the Army Nurse Corps and of ensign on joining the Navy Nurse Corps, and 
are eligible for promotion with increased responsibility, a fact in which all graduates 
of our school take pride because of Miss Maxwell's untiring efforts to secure this 
recognition. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in 
general duty, advancing into head nurse, supervisory, or teaching positions as their 
experience and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who 
wish to specialize in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstet- 
rics, psychiatry, orthopedics, or anesthesia. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

While the demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hos- 
pital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more im- 
portant. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of 
her vocation in private duty may make a real contribution, not only in nursing care, 
but also in health teaching. The private duty nurse has a wide influence upon the 
prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school 
and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and prevendve programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare 
themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or 
in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the civilian hospi- 
tal wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the industrial 
plant or the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility 
and honor. She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public 
health officer, the industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with govern- 
mental and voluntary relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the 
community. It seems probable tiiat American nurses will have a large share of re- 
sponsibility in restoring health and welfare services in many parts of the world after 
the war, and that their opportunities for service will increase rather than diminish, 
both at home and abroad. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and 
study hall are located in this building. There are ten bedroom floors, accommodat- 
ing 350 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort 
has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living 
conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the resi- 
dence hall during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 17.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study and 
practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day including the time spent in the classrooms. On Sunday and one other 
day each week the time on duty is limited to six hours. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block 
system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, 
where the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one nursing care study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient department 
of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during her 
two months' service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to a 
special instructor. Field trips to various welfare agencies and institutions are ar- 
ranged. 

One week of observation of public health nursing with the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York is part of every student's experience. During this period, attention 
is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health serv- 
ice, and the function of the public health nurse is interpreted, both in action and in 
conferences. 

College graduates with advance time credit spend two months at the Institute of 
Living in Hartford, Conn., for the study and practice of psychiatric nursing. 

A three months' affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

A three months' affiliation in communicable disease nursing is given at Willard 
Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of students annually. 






DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching 
purposes. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available 
for instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia 
University is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Bacteriology. Thirty hours. Professor Culbertson and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steri- 
lization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Professor 
Stetten and Miss Gill. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of 
simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the 
apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A 
study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, 
pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of the drugs are 
included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Rathbun. 

A discussion of recreation, relaxation, study and work schedules, mental attitudes, and personal 
hygiene essentials for the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health as a factor in balanced, 
successful living. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Rathbun. 

An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk danc- 
ing, team sports, and hiking: to assist the student to select an activity which she will enjoy pursuing. 
Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective after the Winter 
Session. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Wilde. 

An elementary course in the relation of sanitary conditions to health, with emphasis on public 
health education. This course runs parallel to bacteriology. Some of the topics discussed are: water 
supply, disposal of waste, and control of milk and food supplies. 

Lectures, class discussion, and field trips to the New York City Department of Health, Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York, and various housing projects in New York City. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Iohnson and Miss Goure. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Pettit, Miss Hamilton, and Miss Bater. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital economics. Thirty-five hours. Miss Hamilton. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to effi- 
ciency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing 
systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose 
and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution of linen and 
surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. Miss Bater. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Fifteen hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its physio- 
logical effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local massage, and 
observation in the physical therapy clinic. 

SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Rose and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Elliott and Miss Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demon- 
strations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics 
held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Smull and Knowlton. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course is 
closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Werner and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



Cokmnbia University 




BULL 



INFORMATION 



Forty-sixth Series, No. 3 3 



W 



July 13, 1946 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSIpTO ' 



OF THE 



4!L*bm 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGE °^ ER | If 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I946-I947 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Columbia ?Hmtoergitp PuUettn of information 

Forty-sixth Series, No. 33 July 13, 1946 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningsidc Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly from 
December for forty-one consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter November 4, 
1944, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized. 

These include the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the Announcements of the 
several Colleges and Schools and of certain Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail 
as circumstances require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent 
upon application to the Secretary of the University. 

C. U. P. 5,300 — 1946 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRBSS 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON* AVENUE 




Harold Haliday Costain 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I946-I947 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D. . . . Acting President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D Dean 

Vernon William Lippard, B.S., M.D Associate Dean and Secretary 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. . . Associate Dean and Secretary 

Harry Stoll Mustard, B.S., LL.D., M.D Associate Dean (Public Health ) 

Bion R. East, D.D.S Associate Dean for Dental and Oral Surgery 

Margaret Elizabeth Conrad, A.B Associate Dean (Nursing) 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Frank B. Berry 
George Francis Cahill 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
Wilfred Monroe Copenhaver 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
John Hughes Dunnington 
Bion R. East ' 
Earl Theron Engle 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
Franklin McCue Hanger 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
George H. Humphreys 
John Devereux Kernan 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Vernon William Lippard 
Robert Frederick Loeb 
Walter Gay Lough 
Donovan James McCune 
Rustin McIntosh 
George Miller MacKee 



Ward J. MacNeal 

H. Houston Merritt 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Clay Ray Murray 

Harry Stoll Mustard 

Carl R. Oman 

Walter Walker Palmer 

William Barclay Parsons 

^racy Jackson Putnam 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Henry Alsop Riley 

Walter S. Root 

Thomas H. Russell 

David Seegal 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 

Lawrence W. Sloan 

Alan de Forest Smith 

Gilbert P. Smith 

Harry Pratt Smith 

Philip Edward Smith 

Isidore Snapper 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

William E. Studdiford, Jr. 

FIoward C. Taylor 

Kenneth B. Turner 

Harry B. van Dyke 

Randolph West 

Allen Oldfather Whipple 

William Henry Woglom 

Edwin G. Zabriskie 

Daniel E. Ziskin 



1 On leave 1946-1947. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N. Associate Dean (Nursing), Professor of Nursing, and 

Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 ; B.S., Columbia, 1932 ; A.M., 1937. 

Cectle Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932 ; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radclirfe, 1918 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1926. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1925 ; A.M., Colum- 
bia, 1934. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 ; B.S., Columbia, 1945. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; M.A., Colum- 
bia, 1945. 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Josephine Hallinan Finan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Hazel Goure Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Colorado, 1932. 

Catherine D. Griffin, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 ; B.S., Columbia, 1945. 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929 ; B.S., New York University, 1942. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia, 1939. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Doris Johnson Instructor in Nursing 

M.S., Wisconsin, 1938. 

Ann A. Kirchner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Western Reserve School of Nursing, 1923 ; B.S., Columbia, 1937 ; A.M., 1942. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Instructor in Nursing 

Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942. 

Catherine T. Mulcahy, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hunter, 1938 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 ; B.S., Columbia, 
1941. 

J. Margaret Ada Mutch, R.N * . Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; B.S., Columbia, 1941. 

Esther M. Olver, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Margaret Martin Reisner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; A.M., 
Columbia, 1941. 

Delphine Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N. Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 

Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1912. 

BACTERIOLOGY 
James T. Culbertson, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

CHEMISTRY 
DeWitt Stetten, Jr., M.D., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy Department, 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

MATERIA MEDICA 

Sidney C. Werner, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

NURSING s 

Communicable Diseases 

Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 

William J. Greenfield, A.B., M.D Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Assistant Attending Otolaryngologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 

James L. McGraw, A.B., M.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Assistant Attending Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Gynecological Nursing 

William V. Cavanagh, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital.. 

Medical Nursing 
Thomas H. Hunter, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Harry M. Rose, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Neurological Nursing 

L. Vosburgh Lyons, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Associate Attending Neurologist, Neurological Institute. 

Lester A. Mount, B.S., M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Assistant Neuro-Surgeon, Neurological Institute. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

M. Veronica O'Brien, B.S., M.D Associate in Neurology 

Assistant Neurologist, Neurological Institute. 

Obstetrical Nursing 

John M. Brush, B.S., M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Associate Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D Associate Clinical Professor of 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Saul B. Gusberg, A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Resident Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D Associate Professor of Clinical 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. Obstetrics' and Gynecology 

James M. Greer, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Resident Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service and Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Paul Wilson, A.B., Sc.D., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Resident Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Clinical Director, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 

Surgical Nursing 

Grant Sanger, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Assistant Surgeon, Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Urological Nursing 

Ralph C. Yeaw, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Urology 

Assistant Urologist, Babies Hospital. 

Assistant Surgeon in Urology, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Pathology 

Herbert C. Stoerk, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Junior Assistant Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Clinical Pathology 
Neal J. Conan, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Medicine, Presbyterian Hospital. 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . . . Educational Director, Social Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 

UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Henry McA. Schley, B.S Comptroller 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M Director of University Admissions 

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Carl M. White, Ph.D Director of Libraries 

Rev. Stephen Fielding Bayne, Jr., S.T.M Chaplain of the University 

Frederick Miller, C.E Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S Director of University Residence Halls 

Seymour Robb, A.B. in L.S Medical Librarian 



Eula W. Rathbun Director of Recreation, Department of Nursing 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925. 




A CONVALESCING WARD PATIENT 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

John Sloane, Vice-President 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 

Bayard W. Read, Assistant Treasurer 

William E. S. Griswold, Jr., Secretary 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



Trustees 



Charles E. Adams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Winthrop W. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Thatcher M. Brown 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
William Sheffield Cowles 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston de Forest 
William A. Delano 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
William S. Gray, Jr. 
Peter Grimm 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr. 
W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 



Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 
William Hale Harkness 
Walter E. Hope 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
James C. Mackenzie 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Charles S. Munson 
Bayard W. Read 
Duncan H. Read 
Dean Sage 

Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
John Sloane 
William E. Stevenson 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
Sheldon Whitehouse 
William Williams 



Edward C. Bench 
Percy Chubb, II 
George Lauder Greenway 
Charles Barney Harding 
Deering Howe 
Gerrish H. Milliken 



Honorary Trustees 



Rev. J. V. Moldenhawer 
Charles S. Payson 
Alonzo Potter 
H. Rivington Pyne 
Dr. Edgar F. Romig 
Rev. L. Humphrey Walz 



10 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



Nursing Committee 



Henry C. Alexander, Chairman 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice-Chairman 

Miss Marie C. Byron 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad 

Mrs. Harry N. French 

Mrs. Parmely W. Herrick, Jr. 

Mrs. G. Hermann Kinnicutt 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. 

Walter W. Palmer, M.D. 



Mrs. Stephen H. Philbin 
Tracy J. Putnam, M.D. 
Willard C. Rappleye, M.D. 
Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 
Mrs. Byron Stookey 
Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 
Benjamin P. Watson, M.D. 
Allen O. Whipple, M.D. 
Mrs. Staunton Williams 
John S. Parke, ex-officio 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Helen Young, R.N Director Emeritus of Nursing 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937; B.S., Columbia, 1945. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1936. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1. 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932; B.S., Columbia, 1935. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1926. 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., Colum- 
bia, 1945. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 ; B.S., Columbia, 1940. 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.A., Wooster, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929; A.M., Colum- 
bia, 1941. 

Ruth C. Williams, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1917 ; B.S., Columbia, 1933. 

Phyllis M. Young Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 ; A.M., Columbia, 
1943. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospital, 
offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital was 
founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose object was the establishment 
of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and nursing 
care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Uni- 
versity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 168th 
Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness 
and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and 
the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmol- 
ogy was open in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is a member of the Medical Faculty. 
This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of the University and 
the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of die School of 
Nursing. Two thousand and twenty-five nurses have graduated here in this half 
century. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the funda- 
mental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped 
laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general 
and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community 
in health or sickness are met during experience in.the out-patient department and in 
visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to 
acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nursing 
profession. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The student today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open to her as she 
considers her future. 

Although the days of combat are technically over, and the spotlight of public 
attention is no longer focused on nursing as strongly as it was during the war, the 
need for the services of skilled, intelligent professional nurses continues. Estimates 
of the probable number required for the maintenance of health services throughout 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

the nation, in civilian and military hospitals and in urban and rural communities, 
call for hundreds more professional nurses than are available at present. To a large 
extent, the tremendous responsibilities of reconstruction and rehabilitation of nurs- 
ing services throughout the world must be assumed by American nurses. 

Challenging problems are constantly appearing, calling for careful thought and 
resourceful action. 

The pursuit of nursing as a career is by no means the only significant way to use 
it. A professional education in nursing gives one of the best preparations for the 
varied responsibilities of marriage. Graduate nurses have proven themselves to be 
valuable members of the governing boards of all sorts of organizations in com- 
munities all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly: 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical 
defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to men- 
tion may be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements vary with the school. Advice about courses which should 
be included in the educational program before entrance should be secured from the 
schools of nursing, which will welcome the opportunity to guide their candidates 
well in advance of the date of entrance. All schools expect evidence of real intelli- 
gence and academic achievement. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a hospital before 
entering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities for trying out practical 
"worksamples" of nursing and securing some contact with patients, even at an 
elementary level. Such a procedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving 
one's fitness for nursing and the seriousness of one's interest in the problems of 
health and welfare. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and 
must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal 
application in writing on the blanks supplied by the school. After the application has 
been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing from the college or high school. Students entering from high school 
should present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of 
their school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no 
such specific requirement is made for college students, preference is always given 
to those who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record must also be submitted to the New York State Educa- 
tion Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. This form is known as The Application for Qual c ying Certifi- 
cate and is furnished by the New York State Education Department to l he School of 
Nursing. All necessary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physi- 
cal examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of 
the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time 
of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, 
therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 



THE U. S. CADET NURSE CORPS 

Admission to the U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps was discontinued by Presidential 
proclamation as of October 15, 1945. Students who were already registered and 
studying as Cadets in a school of nursing are continued on the Cadet basis through- 
out their course. No more students may enter schools of nursing as Cadets, however. 



THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences, theory 
and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical experience in medical, surgical, 
obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives in 
the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 
education are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 



ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following classi- 
fications: 

A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as 
for the diploma. Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and 
sociology should be included in the college courses. 

B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a col- 
lege approv d by Columbia University and the New York State Education Depart- 
ment may agister for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well 
as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this 
basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is 
frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or university else- 
where and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, 
including those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements 
outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the 
diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the 
requirements for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student qualifying 
certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Department. 1 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should be ap- 
proved by the University before final selections are made. Applicants should there- 
fore communicate with the Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing two 
years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 



STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a 
degree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science) ; mathe- 
matics, i unit; history, I unit; civics, V2 unit; electives, 7V2 units (language, history, mathematics, 
or physics). The University allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

student of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health 
as well as on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 
tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any'reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in this Department. 



ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the Presi- 
dent in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the 
President, in the Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Admin- 
istrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge 
without the assent of her parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. Stu- 
dents withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reason of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in 
good standing. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in case the 
applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable at the be- 
ginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the University fee of the 
first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay 
a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the beginning of the first year and 
$200 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates 
for the diploma pay a tuition fee of $250 in two installments: $125 at the beginning 
of the first year and $125 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the prob- 
able cost of the course in nursing "(see page 16 for classification). The cost of the 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

college study preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend en- 
tirely upon the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 200 200 125 

Second tuition 200 200 125 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 ... ... 

Five sessions ... 50 50 

Degree application . 20 20 ... 

$470 $480 $310 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student pro- 
vides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $50 
to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All 
necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Fifteen dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student 
nurses in this school. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University Bookstore 
maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Room B-463, exten- 
sion 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other student supplies. 
In addition, it maintains a travel bureau and facilities for cashing checks. Substantial 
savings are effected whenever manufacturers and publishers permit. The store is 
open daily all year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is excellent, 
and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships 
are not open to students until they have been in the School for six months. 

University stipends or grants in aid are available to students in need of financial 
assistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted in amounts of $50 and 
$100. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow reasonable 
amounts without interest at any time after the first term. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in wridng to 
the Associate Dean, Department of Nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the 
Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which 
the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York; and to- 
gether with her state licence to practice nursing (R.N.) it entitles her to membership 
in the American Nurses Association. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward 
a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete the 
work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held four times a year (January, April, July, and October) 
under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. After pass- 
ing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse 
(R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center are eligible for registration. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A 
periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other 
activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, 
and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recrea- 
tional Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a worthy use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 

HEALTH 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 
All students have X-ray examinations of the chest at periodic intervals. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital and 
treated gratuitously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student will be ex- 
pected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of thirty days 
and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed each student who maintains a perfect health and 
attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the eight months' credit for her college degree will be 
allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect attendance in- 
cluding classes. 

VACATION 

A vacation of ten weeks is allowed each student; one week at Christmas during 
the preliminary term, four weeks each during the first and second years and one 
week in the third year. To the student entering with eight months' credit for her 
college degree, six weeks vacation is allowed; one week at Christmas, four weeks at 
the end of the first year and one week in the last year. The dates at which vacations 
are given are subject to the necessities of the School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

Countless opportunities are open to registered professional nurses in different 
fields. The three traditional classifications are private duty, institutional, and public 
health nursing. 

Although active recruiting for the Army and Navy Nurse Corps has ceased, there 
are opportunities for important service and influence in a number of government 
services — the Veterans Administration, the Public Health Service, the Indian 
Service, etc. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in 
general duty, advancing into head nurse, supervisory, or teaching positions as their 
experience and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

wish to specialize in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstet- 
rics, psychiatry, orthopedics, or anesthesia. 

While the demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hos- 
pital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never been more im- 
portant. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of 
her vocation in private duty may make a real contribution, not only in nursing care, 
but also in health teaching. The private duty nurse has a wide influence upon the 
prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school 
and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare 
themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or 
in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the civilian hospi- 
tal wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the industrial 
plant or the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility 
and honor. She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public 
health officer, the industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with govern- 
mental and voluntary relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the 
community. American nurses will have a large share of responsibility in restoring 
health and welfare services in many parts of the world after the devastation of the 
war. The opportunities for service will increase rather than diminish, both at home 
and abroad. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of 
the School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking 
the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other build- 
ings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room and 
study hall are located in this building. Two new wings have been added during the 
past year, increasing both the housing capacity and the library facilities. There are 
ten bedroom floors, accommodating 450 students. Each student has a single room 
with running water. Every effort has been made to create a homelike atmosphere 
and provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the resi- 
dence hall during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 14.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, study and 
practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day for six days weekly including the time spent in classrooms. Class attend- 
ance time on days off duty is made up on Sunday. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite peri- 
ods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: 
The students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is 
included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and 
the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' experience 
in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the oudine of the block 
system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, 
where the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are given to 
each student during the senior year. In the special services the classes are correlated 
with the practical experience. 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one nursing care study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient department 
of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during her two 
months' service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to a special 
instructor. Field trips to various welfare agencies and institutions are arranged. 

Two weeks of instruction and observation in public health nursing is part of every 
student's experience in connection with her Out-Patient Department Service. During 
this period, attention is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects 
of family health service, and the function of the public health nurse is interpreted, 
both in action and in conference. 

College graduates with advance time credit spend two months at the Institute of 
Living in Hartford, Conn., for the study and practice of psvchiatric nursing. 

A three months' affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psvchiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

A three months' affiliation in communicable disease nursing is given at Willard 
Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of students annually. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching 
purposes. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available 
for instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia Uni 
versity is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor Rogers and 
Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Microbiology. Thirty hours. Professor Culbertson and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, steri- 
lization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common patho- 
genic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Professor 
Stetten and Miss Gill. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia medica, 
and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes knowledge of 
simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights and measures, the 
apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions commonly used in nursing. A 
study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an introduction to the study of drugs, 
pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the accurate administration of the drugs are 
included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Rathbun. 

A discussion of recreation, relaxation, study and work schedules, mental attitudes, and personal 
hygiene essentials for the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health as a factor in balanced, 
successful living. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Rathbun. 

An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk danc- 
ing, team sports, and hiking: to assist the student to select an activity which she will enjoy pursuing. 
Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective after the Winter 
Session. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Hamon. 

An elementary course in Community Health responsibilities. In the first half various aspects of 
sanitation, as water supply, milk supply, and sewage disposal are studied in their relation to health. 
The second part of the course surveys the voluntary and official agencies for the control and advance- 
ment of health. Field trips are included. , 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Iohnson and Miss Goure. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the stand- 
ards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Pettit and Miss Griffin. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the under- 
lying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's surroundings, 
simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient and the attitude of 
the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations there is supervised practice 
in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital economics. Thirty-five hours. Miss Griffin. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related to effi- 
ciency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and plumbing 
systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigeration, purpose 
and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution of linen and 
surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good bandaging, 
as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, and to develop a 
certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Ten hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its physio- 
logical effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local massage, and 
observation in the physical therapy clinic. 

SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Drs. Hunter and Rose and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types 
of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Sanger and Miss Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demon- 
strations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics 
held each week on the surgical wards. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Conan and Stoerk. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discus- 
sions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course is 
closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Werner and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Johnson. 

This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit, Miss Hamilton, 
and Miss Griffin. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are dem- 
onstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in the class- 
room as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human 
behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic understanding of the motives of conduct 
with particular application to nursing. 



SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Cavanagh. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the pelvis, 
treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Yeaw. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Greenfield. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and 
throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. McGraw and Miss Wright. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases and 
their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: the 
equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used 
in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical emergencies, 
including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and camp as well as in daily 
life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are emphasized. The course is based on 
courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for pre- 
ventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by 
nurse instructors. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 

Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 
Field trips are arranged to the Children's Court of Domestic Relations and institutions concerned 
with aspects of mental hygiene, mental illness, and rehabilitation. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tradi- 
tions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which 
have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects cer- 
tain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demonstration and 
discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to prepare the student nurse to meet 
situations in nursing outside the hospital, using such equipment as is found in a home. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

THIRD YEAR 
Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

Lectures and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instructor, given 
at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center, comprise this course. 
This instruction is coincident with clinical experience on the obstetrical service. 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal condi- 
tions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

This course is coincident with clinical experience on the pediatric service. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, stating 
their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the student nurse 
to the varied branches of nursing. Special emphasis is placed on the international aspects of nursing, 
and on the effect of the war on nursing activities. 




I 3 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAX HOSPITAL NOW PLACED AT 
ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



Forty-seventh Series, No. 23 



May 31, 1947 



x>C 





SERIAL 



ANNOUNCEME 




F THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 



OF THE 



f9mt ^mEJL— 
COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 



-1948 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

630 WEST l68TH STREET • NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Columbia ^nibcr^itp bulletin of information 

Forty-seventh Series, No. 23 May 31, 1947 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningsidc Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly 
from December for forty-four consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class 
matter September 13, 1946, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act 
of August 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at a special rate of postage provided 
for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the 
Announcements of the several Colleges and Schools, relating to the work of the 
next year. These are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to 
make changes in detail as circumstances require. The current number of any 
of these Announcements will be sent upon application to the Secretary of the 
University. 

C. U. P. 5.300-1947 



Application blanks and any further information about the 
course in nursing should be secured from the Department 
of Nursing, School of Medicine, Columbia University, 620 
West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

To the Trustees of Columbia University in 
the City of New York I give and bequeath 
the sum of $ , to be used by said 

Trustees for the uses and purposes of said 
Corporation. 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 



e e ff p e e 




F F F 


IFF 


III 


III 


ill 


F F E a 


III 


. F F F 





Wurts Brothers 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1947-1948 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST l68TH STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 

Faculty of Medicine 3 

Department of Nursing: Officers of Instruction 4 

Presbyterian Hospital 9 

Officers 9 

Administrative Staff, Nursing Service 10 

History of the School of Nursing 11 

The Choice of a Profession . 12 

Careers in Nursing 12 

The Nursing Course 14 

Admission, Registration, and Expenses 14 

General Regulations 17 

General Information 19 

Plan of Instruction 21 

Courses of Instruction 23 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, LL.D., Litt.D Acting President 

of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D Dean 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. Associate Dean and Secretary 
Harry Stoll Mustard, B.S., LL.D., M.D. . Associate Dean (Public Health) 
Bion R. East, D.D.S. . . . Associate Dean (Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Margaret Elizabeth Conrad, A.B Associate Dean (Nursing) 

John Bacchus Truslow, A.B., M.D. . Assistant Dean (Graduate Studies) 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana Winslow Atchley 
Frank B. Berry 
George Francis Cahill 
Louis Casamajor 
Hans Thacher Clarke 
Margaret Elizabeth Conrad 
Wilfred Monroe Copenhaver 
James Albert Corscaden 
Walter Taylor Dannreuther 
William Darrach 
Adolph George De Sanctis 
Samuel Randall Detwiler 
Alphonse Raymond Dochez 
John Hughes Dunnington 
Bion R. East 
Earl Theron Engle 
Joseph Edward Flynn 
Ross Golden 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen 
Franklin McCue Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice John Hickey 
Joseph Gardner Hopkins 
George H. Humphreys, II 
John Devereux Kernan 
Nolan Don Carpentier Lewis 
Robert Frederick Loeb 
Walter Gay Lough 
Donovan James McCune 
Rustin McIntosh 



George Miller MacKee 

Hiram Houston Merritt 

Edgar Grim Miller, Jr. 

Harry Stoll Mustard 

Carl R. Oman 

Walter Walker Palmer 

William Barclay Parsons 

Tracy Jackson Putnam 

Willard Cole Rappleye 

Dickinson Woodruff Richards, Jr. 

Maurice N. Richter 

Henry Alsop Riley 

Walter Stanton Root 

Thomas H. Russell 

David Seegal 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 

Lawrence Wells Sloan 

Alan de Forest Smith 

Gilbert P. Smith 

Harry Pratt Smith 

Philip Edward Smith 

Isidore Snapper 

Arthur Purdy Stout 

Howard Canning Taylor, Jr. 

John Bacchus Truslow 

Kenneth B. Turner 

Harry B. van Dyke 

Randolph West 

Edwin G. Zabriskie 

Daniel E. Ziskin 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N. Associate Dean (Nursing), Professor of Nurs- 
ing, and Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N. . . . Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1921. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen C. Goo-dale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N. . Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921; A.M., 1934; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1925. 



Harriet Benedict, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mount Holyoke, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1946. 

Louise Christman, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927. 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Mary Edna Fitzpatrick, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Mercy Hospital, 1930. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Catherine D. Griffin, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1929. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Marionelise Hayes, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Doris Johnson Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1932; M.S.. 1938. 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1936. 

Ulah Lewis, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Ohio University, 1943. 

Ruth Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932; A.M., New York University, 1943; B.S., 
Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1905; A.M., California, 1910; Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1933. 

J. Margaret Ada Mutch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Rosemary Ryan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Mary Tirrell, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Pembroke, 1940; B.S., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1943. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1927. 

Delphine Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Marguerite Lynn Williams, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Jane Wyatt, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 



Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N. . Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 
Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

BACTERIOLOGY 
Margaret Holden, B.S., A.M., Ph.D Associate in Bacteriology 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

CHEMISTRY 

Eleanor M. K. Darby, A.B., M.S., Ph.D Research Associate in 

Orthopedic Surgery (Biochemistry) 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy 

Department, Vanderbilt Clinic 

MATERIA MEDICA 
Sidney C. Werner, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . . Associate in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 

Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

President of the Medical Board, Willard Parker Hospital. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 
Daniel C. Baker, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Instructor in Otolaryngology 

Assistant Attending Otolaryngologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Diseases of the Eye 
Robert R. Chace, Ph.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Assistant Attending Ophthalmologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Gynecological Nursing 
William V. Cavanagh, M.D. . Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Sloane Hospital. 

Medical Nursing 
Thomas H. Hunter, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Harry M. Rose, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Neurological Nursing 
L. Vosburgh Lyons, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Associate Attending Neurologist, Neurological Institute. 

Lester A. Mount, B.S., M.B., M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Assistant Neuro-Surgeon, Neurological Institute. 

M. Veronica O'Brien, B.S., M.D Associate in Neurology 

Assistant Neurologist, Neurological Institute. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

Obstetrical Nursing 
John M. Brush, B.S., M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Associate Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

E. Everett Bunzel, B.Litt., M.D. . . . Associate Clinical Professor of 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D. . . Associate Professor of Clinical 

Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

James M. Greer, A.B., M.D. . . Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Resident Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Saul B. Gusberg, M.D. .... Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Howard C. Moloy, M.S., M.D. . Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician, Sloane Hospital. 

Pediatric Nursing 
!Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D. . . . Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Director of Pediatric Service and Attending Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Paul Wilson, A.B., Sc.D., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Assistant Pediatrician, Babies Hospital. 

Psychiatric Nursing 
Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D. . . . Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Clinical Director, New York State Psychiatric Institute. 

Surgical Nursing 
Jose M. Ferrer, A.B., M.D Instructor in Anatomy 

Attending Surgeon, Babies Hospital. 

Urological Nursing 
Ralph C. Yeaw, A.B., M.D., Med. Sc.D Associate in Urology 

Assistant Urologist, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Pathology 
Dorothea E. G. Worcester, A.B., M.D. . . . Instructor in Pathology 

Resident in Pathology. 

Clinical Pathology 
David W. Blood, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Assistant Physician, Presbyterian Hospital. 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M. . Acting Director, Social Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 

1 On leave Spring Session. 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Philip M. Hayden, A.M Secretary of the University 

Frank H. Bowles, A.M Director of University Admissions 

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University 

W. Emerson Gentzler, A.M Bursar of the University 

Carl M. White, Ph.D Director of Libraries 

Thomas A. McGoey, M.S. . . Director of University Residence Halls 
Eula W. Rathbun, B.S., A.M. . . Director of Recreation, Department 

of Nursing 
Seymour Robb, A.B. in L.S Medical Librarian 




A CONVALESCING WARD PATIENT 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

John Sloane, Vice-President 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 

Bayard W. Read, Assistant Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Secretary 

Thatcher M. Brown, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



Trustees 



Charles E. Adams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Winthrop W. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Edward C. Bench 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
William Sheffield Cowles 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston De Forest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
Artemis L. Gates 
William S. Gray, Jr. 
Peter Grimm 
William E. S. Griswold, Sr. 



W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 
William Hale Harkness 
Walter E. Hope 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
Robert A. Lovett 
James C. Mackenzie 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Charles S. Munson 
Edgar A. Newberry 
Bayard W. Read 
Dean Sage 

Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
John Sloane 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
Sidney J. Weinberg 
Mrs. Sheldon Whitehouse 



Honorary Trustees 



Thatcher M. Brown, Sr. 
Percy Chubb, II 
William A. Delane 
George Lauder Greenway 
Charles Barney Harding 
Deering Howe 
Gerrish H. Milliken 



Rev. J. V. Moldenhawer 
Charles S. Payson 
H. Rivington Pyne 
Dr. Edgar F. Romig 
William E. Stevenson 
Rev. L. Humphrey Walz 



10 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing Committee 

Henry C. Alexander, Chairman Mrs. Stephen H. Philbin 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice-Chairman Tracy J. Putnam, M.D. 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, V ice-Chairman Willard C. Rappleye, M.D. 

Miss Marie C. Byron Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad Mrs. Byron Stookey 

Mrs. Harry N. French Howard C. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 

George H. Humphreys, II, M.D. Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 

Mrs. G. Hermann Kinnicutt Mrs. Staunton Williams 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. John S. Parke, ex-officio 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 
Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Nellie Estey, RN Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1929. 

Jane Wyatt, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Phyllis M. Young Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1927. 



HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known 
general hospital, offering valuable opportunities for the clinical educa- 
tion of nurses. The Hospital was founded in 1868 by a group of New 
York men whose object was the establishment of an institution "for the 
purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and nursing care to sick 
or disabled persons of every creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the 
Presbyterian Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., M.A., was the first 
Director of the School, establishing the plans for administration and 
instruction and guiding it for thirty years. The Board of Managers later 
added the responsibility of affording clinical education for the medical 
students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia Uni- 
versity, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia University 
and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present loca- 
tion, on 168th Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of 
Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were 
generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were 
Sloane Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, 
Vanderbilt Clinic, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute and 
Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmology was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsi- 
bility for the educational program of the School of Nursing of the Pres- 
byterian Hospital, under the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is 
an Associate Dean and a member of the Faculty of Medicine. This affilia- 
tion marked another step in the closer integration of the University and 
the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Nursing. Two thousand and twenty-five nurses have graduated 
here in this half century. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and 
the School of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with 
the essentials demanded by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse 
to society. Instruction in the fundamental medical sciences can best be 
given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped laboratories and prac- 
tice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general and 
special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the com- 
munity in health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient 
department and in visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open 
for the student nurse to acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm 
foundation in the nursing profession. 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The student today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open to 
her as she considers her future. 

Although the days of combat are technically over, and the spotlight 
of public attention is no longer focused on nursing as strongly as it was 
during the war, the need for the services of skilled, intelligent profes- 
sional nurses continues. Estimates of the probable number required for 
the maintenance of health services throughout the nation, in civilian and 
military hospitals and in urban and rural communities, call for hundreds 
more professional nurses than are available at present. To a large extent, 
the tremendous responsibilities of reconstruction and rehabilitation of 
nursing services throughout the world must be assumed by American 
nurses. 

Challenging problems are constantly appearing, calling for careful 
thought and resourceful action. 

The pursuit of nursing as a career is by no means the only significant 
way to use it. A professional education in nursing gives one of the best 
preparations for the varied responsibilities of marriage. Graduate nurses 
have proven themselves to be valuable members of the governing boards 
of all sorts of organizations in communities all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans 
should evaluate her qualifications candidly and thoroughly: 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of 
any physical defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may 
seem too insignificant to mention may be disqualifying for a strenu- 
ous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements vary with the school. Advice about courses 
which should be included in the educational program before entrance 
should be secured from the schools of nursing, which will welcome the 
opportunity to guide their candidates well in advance of the date of 
entrance. All schools expect evidence of real intelligence and academic 
achievement. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a 
hospital before entering a school of nursing. There are many opportu- 
nities for trying out practical "worksamples" of nursing and securing 
some contact with patients, even at an elementary level. Such a pro- 
cedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for 
nursing and the seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health 
and welfare. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

Countless opportunities are open to registered professional nurses in 
different fields. The three traditional classifications are private duty, insti- 
tutional, and public health nursing. 

Although active recruiting for the Army and Navy Nurse Corps has 
ceased, there are opportunities for important service and influence in a 
number of government services— the Veterans Administration, the Public 
Health Service, the Indian Service, etc. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 13 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their 
careers in general duty, advancing into head nurse, supervisory, or teach- 
ing positions as their experience and achievement warrant. There are many 
opportunities for those who wish to specialize in certain clinical branches 
of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, psychiatry, or orthopedics. 

While the demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in 
the hospital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never 
been more important. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding 
of the possibilities of her vocation in private duty may make a real con- 
tribution, not only in nursing care, but also in health teaching. The 
private duty nurse has a wide influence upon the prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of 
activities which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting 
nursing, school and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational 
and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to 
prepare themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing 
or hospitals, or in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the 
civilian hospital wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the 
tenement, in the industrial plant or the rural community, the modern 
nurse occupies a position of responsibility and honor. She is constantly in 
contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the indus- 
trial physician, and the social worker, as well as with governmental and 
voluntary relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the 
community. American nurses will have a large share of responsibility in 
restoring health and welfare services in many parts of the world after the 
devastation of the war. The opportunities for service will increase rather 
than diminish, both at home and abroad. 



THE NURSING COURSE 
ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSES 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty- 
five and must present a record of good health. All candidates are required 
to make formal application in writing on the blanks supplied by the 
school. After the application has been submitted, the academic record of 
the candidate will be secured by the Department of Nursing from the 
college or high school. Students entering from high school should present 
a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their 
school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no 
such specific requirement is made for college students, preference is always 
given to those who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for 
final approval to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia Uni- 
versity. An official transcript of the academic record must also be submitted 
to the New York State Education Department, since all students in regis- 
tered schools of nursing must be approved by the Department. This form 
is known as The Application for Qualifying Certificate and is furnished by 
the New York State Education Department to the School of Nursing. All 
necessary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for 
the physical examination by the school physician will be made, probably 
within six months of the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary 
interview and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all 
requirements at the time of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate 
immediate withdrawal. She should, therefore, come financially prepared to 
return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final 
acceptance. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational pro- 
gram of Columbia University, and all students in the Department of 
Nursing are registered as University students. The course includes instruc- 
tion in the basic sciences, theory and practice of nursing techniques, and 
clinical experience in medical, surgical, obstetric, and pediatric nursing, 
nutrition, and various specialties and electives in the Presbyterian Hospital 
and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, 
the basic course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have 
had previous college education are expected to maintain a higher level of 
achievement, both in the classroom and on the wards. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in 
separate sections. 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following 
classifications: 

Group A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to 
Columbia University and to the New York State Education Department 
may register with advanced time credit of eight months, completing the 
course in two years and four months. Such students are considered candi- 
dates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. 
Courses in natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and sociology 
should be included in the college courses. 

Group B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years 
of study in a college approved by Columbia University and the New York 
State Education Department may register for the basic course in nursing 
to be completed in three years. Such students are considered candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. The sixty 
points in liberal arts required for admission on this basis should include 
chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is frequently 
referred to as a five-year course— two years in a college or university else- 
where and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, 
acceptable to Columbia University and the New York State Education 
Department, and who show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation 
in sixteen units of subject matter, including those who have completed 
college study not meeting the requirements outlined under A and B, may 
register for the three-year basic course, receiving the diploma in nursing 
upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the require- 
ments for entrance to Columbia University and for a nurse student quali- 
fying certificate as prescribed by the New York State Education Depart- 
ment. 1 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should 
be approved by the University before final selections are made. Applicants 
should therefore communicate with the Executive Officer of the Depart- 
ment of Nursing two years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank 
giving such information as may be required. Registration takes place in 
Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on 
the first Friday in September. 

1 English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry, and either biology or general science); 
mathematics, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; civics, % unit; electives, iy 2 units (language, history, 
mathematics, or physics). The University allows no credit for commercial or home 
economics courses. 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded 
in case the applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $10 for each session or fraction thereof is payable 
at the beginning of each session. The application fee is credited on the 
University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the begin- 
ning of the first year and $200 at the beginning of the second year. 
Students taking the course as candidates for the diploma pay a tuition fee 
of $250 in two installments: $125 at the beginning of the first year and 
$125 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating 
the probable cost of the course in nursing (see page 15 for classification). 
The cost of the college study preceding entrance to the nursing course in 
Group B will depend entirely upon the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $ 10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 200 200 125 

Second tuition 200 200 125 

University fees 

Four sessions 40 ... ... 

Five sessions 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 

$470 $480 $310 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to 
Columbia University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reason- 
able amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the 
student provides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding 
approximately $75 to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are 
provided by the Hospital. All necessary textbooks and instruments are 
also supplied by the Hospital. 

A fee of $3.00 will be charged for each deficiency examination, payable 
before the examination. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Fifteen dollars per month 
has been found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and 
vacations, for student nurses in this school. 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing gives a limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded 
annually to students whose record of achievement in classes and ward 
practice is high, whose health is excellent, and who are making a con- 
tribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships are not open 
to students until they have been in the School for six months. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

University stipends or grants in aid are available to students in need 
of financial assistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted 
in amounts of $50 and $100. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship covers the cost of tuition and University 
fees for a degree candidate during her three years in the School. This 
scholarship has been given in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President 
of the Presbyterian Hospital Board of Trustees, by his family. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow 
reasonable amounts without interest at any time after the first term. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in 
writing to the Associate Dean, Department of Nursing. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy 
for a degree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a 
matriculated student of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of 
character and health as well as on the fulfillment of the academic require- 
ments. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered 
a student of the University during the session for which she is registered 
unless her connection with the University is officially severed by with- 
drawal or otherwise. No student registered in any school or college of the 
University shall at the same time be registered in any other school or 
college, either of Columbia University or of any other institution, without 
the consent of the appropriate Dean or Director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in 
the Department of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason 
to be unsuited to the conditions of study in this Department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the 
receipt by her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of 
any degree or the granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the 
disciplinary powers of the University, which is free to cancel her registra- 
tion at any time on any grounds which it deems advisable. The disciplinary 
authority of the University is vested in the President in such cases as he 
deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the President, in the 
Dean of each Faculty and the Director of the work of each Administrative 
Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good 
academic standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to with- 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

draw from the University; but no student under the age of twenty-one 
years shall be entitled to a discharge without the assent of her parent or 
guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. Students withdrawing are 
required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reason of weight, grant a leave of absence to a 
student in good standing. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each sub- 
ject, according to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. A deficiency examina- 
tion will be required of every student failing to receive a passing grade 
(75 percent) in any course. Failure to obtain a passing grade will be suffi- 
cient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from 
the School. 



TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are lo- 
cated in the main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room 
with a lantern screen. Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special 
laboratory equipped for teaching purposes. The amphitheaters and labora- 
tories of the School of Medicine are available for instruction in anatomy, 
bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in 
Anna C. Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. 
Maxwell Reference Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied 
with the latest editions of approved reference books. The library of the 
School of Medicine of Columbia University is available to those desiring 
advanced professional study. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of 
Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily 
completed the prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who 
are recommended by the Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the 
University degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyte- 
rian Hospital, upon recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The 
graduation exercises at which the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded 
are held in the Presbyterian Hospital gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City 
of New York; and together with her state license to practice nursing 
(R.N.) it entitles her to membership in the American Nurses Association. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia 
University, offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing them- 
selves further for work in the nursing school, hospital, and public health 
fields. Those who receive the degree of Bachelor of Science on completion 
of the nursing courses may work toward a Master of Arts degree. Those 
who receive the diploma only may complete the work for the Bachelor of 
Science degree. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master 
of Science degree, are offered by the Department of Nursing to graduate 
nurses who hold acceptable bachelor's degrees and who have had satis- 
factory experience. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (R.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational re- 
quirements of the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New 
York. Having met these requirements, its graduates are eligible for the 
examinations of the Board of Regents. These examinations are held four 
times a year (January, April, July, and October) under the direction of the 
Department of Education of New York State. After passing these examina- 
tions the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse (R.N.). 
Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center are eligible for registration. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government 
Association with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization 
and officers. A periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly 
by the students. Other activities include a dramatic club, lending library, 
glee club, forum club, orchestra, and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use 
of the swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direc- 
tion of the Recreational Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, 
corrective gymnastics, and tennis. The program is planned to meet the 
individual needs and interests of the student and to provide a worthy 
use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a classroom program, 
but each student is required to participate in one or more of these 
activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered 
in the city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other 
intellectual pursuits. 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence 
Hall of the School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof con- 
struction overlooking the Hudson River and is connected by an under- 
ground passage with the other buildings of the Medical Center. Living 
rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room and study hall are located in 
this building. Two new wings were added in 1945, increasing both the 
housing capacity and the library facilities. There are ten bedroom floors, 
accommodating 450 students. Each student has a single room with running 
water. Every effort has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and 
provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in 
the residence hall during the course of study, except during certain 
affiliations. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University 
Bookstore maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Room 2-463, extension 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks 
and all other student supplies. In addition, it maintains a travel bureau 
and facilities for cashing checks. Substantial savings are effected whenever 
manufacturers and publishers permit. The store is open daily all year. 

HEALTH 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept 
of hours of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, when- 
ever necessary, by the school physician, together with any laboratory 
investigation which may be indicated. All students have x-ray examina- 
tions of the chest at periodic intervals. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital 
and treated gratuitously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student 
will be expected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care and 
eye refraction. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of 
thirty days and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed each student who maintains a perfect 
health and attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the eight months' credit for her college degree 
will be allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect 
attendance including classes. 

VACATION 

A vacation of ten weeks is allowed each student; one week at Christmas 
during the preliminary term, four weeks each during the first and second 
years and one week in the third year. To the student entering with eight 
months' credit for her college degree, six weeks' vacation is allowed; one 







■MMHH 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

week, at Christmas, four weeks at the end of the first year and one week 
in the last year. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the 
necessities of the School and Hospital. 



RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each 
student may attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on 
Sundays. Morning prayers are held each day, and all students reporting 
on duty are required to attend. 



PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students 
except those entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the 
University. (See page 15.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards 
is required of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction, 
study and practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. 
Following this period of intensive study, the student is gradually intro- 
duced to the general care of the sick on the wards. One month of this 
experience gives to the student a basis for deciding whether or not she is 
justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, and an opportunity 
to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she receives 
the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom 
and practical work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each 
student is on duty eight hours a day for six days weekly including the 
time spent in classrooms. Class attendance time on days off duty is made 
up on Sunday. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three 
definite periods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement 
has several advantages: the students are not on night duty while going 
to class; the time spent in class is included in the eight hours on duty 
so that the number of hours on the ward and the responsibilities given are 
decreased; and in planning the students' experience in the various services, 
especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical 
wards, where the student obtains her actual experience in the funda- 
mentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; 
nose and throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' ex- 
perience in obstetrics at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics 
at Babies Hospital are provided for each student. In the special services 
the classes are correlated with the practical experience. 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Clinics, at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the 
wards once a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. 
Each student writes one nursing care study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient 
department of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each 
student during her two months' service there. Supervision of this teaching 
program is assigned to a special instructor. Field trips to various welfare 
agencies and institutions are arranged. Two weeks of instruction and 
observation in public health nursing is part of every student's experience 
in connection with her Out-Patient Department Service. During this 
period, attention is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social 
aspects of family health service, and the function of the public health 
nurse is interpreted, both in action and in conference. 

College graduates with advanced time credit spend two months at the 
Institute of Living in Hartford, Conn., for the study and practice of 
psychiatric nursing. 

A three months' affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the 
New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are 
given to all students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute 
and those completing the course in less than three years. 

An affiliation of eight weeks in communicable disease nursing is given 
at Willard Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of 
students annually. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Rogers and Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and 
systems of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and micro- 
scopic specimens. Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Microbiology. Thirty hours. Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immu- 
nology, sterilization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis 
and common pathogenic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. 
Darby and Miss Gill. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia 
medica, and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes 
knowledge of simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights 
and measures, the apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions com- 
monly used in nursing. A study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an 
introduction to the study of drugs, pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the 
accurate administration of the drugs are included. Laboratory work, including demon- 
strations, supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Rathbun. 

A discussion of recreation, relaxation, study and work schedules, mental attitudes, and 
personal hygiene essentials for the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health as a 
factor in balanced, successful living. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Rathbun. 

An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk 
dancing, team sports, and hiking: to assist the student to select an activity which she will 
enjoy pursuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities 
are elective after the Winter Session. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Hamon. 

An elementary course in Community Health responsibilities. In the first half various 
aspects of sanitation, as water supply, milk supply, and sewage disposal are studied in their 
relation to health. The second part of the course surveys the voluntary and official agencies 
for the control and advancement of health. Field trips are included. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Johnson and Miss 
Lewis. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of 
each. Foods are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent 
is studied and traced through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. 
Emphasis is placed upon the standards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and 
abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. 
In the preparation of food, emphasis is given to. appearance, flavor, and preservation of 
food value. The lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable 
for a breakfast are prepared in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration 
is given to size of servings, temperature of the food, general arrangement, and attractive- 
ness of the tray. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the 
responsibilities of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of 
institutional management which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special 
consideration is given to professional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper 
attitude toward patients, physicians, and co-workers. 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. 
Professor Pettit and Miss Griffin. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the 
underlying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's 
surroundings, simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the 
patient and the attitude of the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these 
demonstrations there is supervised practice in the classrooms throughout the course and 
on the wards during the last half of the session. 

Hospital economics. Thirty-five hours. Miss Griffin. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related 
to efficiency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, 
and plumbing systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, 
refrigeration, purpose and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system 
of distribution of linen and surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good 
bandaging, as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic 
work, and to develop a certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of 
the simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Ten hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its 
physiological effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and 
local massage, and observation in the physical therapy clinic. 

SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 
Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Rose and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative 
types of diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstra- 
tions of special types of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each 
week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Ferrer and Miss Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the 
principal surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing 
classes or demonstrations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is 
supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the surgical service. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Dr. Worcester and Dr. 
Blood. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of 
clinical diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstra- 
tions, class discussions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes 
in tissues. The course is closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 

Materia medica. Thirty hours. Dr. Werner and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their thera- 
peutic action, emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and 
the observation of their effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor 
and include demonstrations of the action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical 
wards. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Johnson. 

This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the 
student studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet 
is used as the basis for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance 
of adapting the diet to the patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit, Miss 
Lynch, and Miss Ryan. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing 
are demonstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised 
practice in the classroom as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying 
human behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic understanding of the 
motives of conduct with particular application to nursing. 



SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Cavanagh. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of 
the pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month 
of clinical experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Yeaw. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each 
student has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of 
teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Dr. Baker. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, 
nose, and throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Chace and Miss 
Wright. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common 
diseases and their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the 
Institute of Ophthalmology. Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Christman and Miss 
Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included 
are: the equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the 
various materials used in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student con- 
tinues her study during her two months' experience in the operating room. These classes 
include four lectures on anesthesia. 



26 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Surgical emergencies. Ten hours. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical 
emergencies, including those encountered in special fields of nursing such as industry and 
camp as well as in daily life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are 
emphasized. The course is based on courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. 
Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early 
recognition of symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility 
and opportunities for preventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations 
of isolation technique are given by nurse instructors. 

Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental 
and physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of 
mentally ill patients. The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed 
with special emphasis on the part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held 
at the New York State Psychiatric Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydro- 
therapy and occupational therapy are conducted. Field trips are arranged to the Children's 
Court of Domestic Relations and institutions concerned with aspects of mental hygiene, 
mental illness, and rehabilitation. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of 
nursing traditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, 
and the people and influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The 
lectures art illustrated by lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and 
individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social 
Service Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic 
factors which have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and 
effect. Methods of teaching include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases 
and collateral reading discussed in class. 

Review of nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor 
selects certain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives 
one demonstration and discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to 
prepare the student nurse to meet situations in nursing outside the hospital, using euch 
equipment as is found in a home. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. 
Class discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they 
arise in the student's experience. 



THIRD YEAR 



Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. 



Lectures and clinics by obstetricians and classes and demonstrations by a nurse instruc- 
tor, given at Sloane Hospital for Women, one of the units of the Medical Center, comprise 
this course. 

This instruction is coincident with clinical experience on the obstetrical service. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 27 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnor- 
mal conditions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of 
sick children. The students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in 
addition to supervision of practice on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse 
instructors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the 
units of the Medical Center. 

This course is coincident with clinical experience on the pediatric service. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. 

Thirty hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, 
stating their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce 
the student nurse to the varied branches of nursing. Special emphasis is placed on the 
international aspects of nursing, and on the effect of the war on nursing activities. 




Wurts Brothers 
THE GRADUATING CLASS MARCHING TO THE COMMENCEMENT 

EXERCISES 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED 
AT ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



JxjTjT^TjnjnjTJ-u-urlS "fcR6WNEb JMb Skt upon a heigi n 

nPlan qp'JBuildinqs and Qroundsr^ 

Columbia University 



Horace Mann -Lincoln ScJwol 
4Z5~West mrd Street J 




114 th Street 



WKth Street 



'ttnycTTfbtlwIitK, 



114 th Street 



1 Statue of Alma Mater 

2 Class of i SSi Flag Staff 
j Rodin's Penscur 

4 Hewitt Gates 

.1 Class of 1 886 Evcdra 

6 Class of'93 Chapel Bell 

7 Hewitt Cates 

8 HewittGates 

9 ClassofiS87\VellHtaa 
to Class of 188S Gate 

I j Statue oj 'Great God Ptm. 
12 Class of 1882 Cates 



13 Mapes Gates 

14 Helen Hartley Jenkins Geer 

McmorialGate 

15 ClassofiSoiGatt 

16 Maimer's Hammerman 

l88oMincsClassGift 

17 Lafayette Post Flag Pole 

18 ClassofiaooPylon 

19 Class of 1 S90 Pylon 

20 Classes cftSSj and 1899 

Tablet 
31 Jefferson Statue 



22 Van Amringe Memorial 
23- 1906 Clock 
21 Hamilton Statue 
2} Class of 1SS0 Cates 

26 Hewitt Cates 

27 Mitchell Memorial 

28 Rives Memorial Steps 

29 Class of 1 S85 Sun Dial 

30 Pine Memorial Pylon 

31 Dwight Memorial Pylon 

32 Agricultural Greenhouse 

33 Botany Greenhouse 



Columbia flUntoertfttp #JuUettn of 3mformatton 

Forty-eighth Series, No. 20 May 8, 1948 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly 
from December for forty-four consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter 
September 13, 1946, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 
24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the Announce- 
ments of the several Colleges and Schools relating to the work of the next year. These 
are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail 
as circumstances require. The current number of any of these Announcements will 
be sent upon application to the Secretary of the University. 
C. U. P. 6,700-1948 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I948-I949 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

620 WEST l68TH STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 

Faculty of Medicine 3 

Department of Nursing: Officers of Instruction 4 

Presbyterian Hospital . 8 

Officers 8 

Administrative Staff, Nursing Service 9 

History of the School of Nursing 11 

The Choice of a Profession 12 

Careers in Nursing 12 

The Nursing Course 14 

Admission, Registration, and Expenses 14 

General Regulations 17 

General Information 19 

Plan of Instruction 21 

Courses of Instruction 23 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




Wurts Brothers 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Dwight D. Eisenhower, LL.D President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D Dean 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. Associate Dean and Secretary 
1 Harry Stoll Mustard, B.S., LL.D., M.D. . Associate Dean (Public Health) 

Bion R. East, D.D.S Associate Dean (Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Margaret Elizabeth Conrad, A.B Associate Dean (Nursing) 

John Bacchus Truslow, A.B., M.D. . . Assistant Dean (Graduate Studies) 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana W. Atchley 
Frank B. Berry 
James Bordley 
Harold W. Brown 
Charles L. Buxton 
George F. Cahill 
A. Benson Cannon 
Hans T. Clarke 
Margaret E. Conrad 
Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
D. Anthony D'Esopo 
Samuel R. Detwiler 
A. Raymond Dochez 
John H. Dunnington 
Bion R. East 
Earl T. Engle 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 
Angus M. Frantz 
Alfred Gilman 
Ross Golden 
Magnus I. Gregersen 1 
Alexander B. Gutman 

CUSHMAN D. HAAGERSEN 

Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Leland E. Hinsie 
Houghton Holliday 
George H. Humphreys, II 
Claus W. Jungeblut 



Yale Kneeland, Jr. 
Nolan D. C. Lewis 
John S. Lockwood 
Robert F. Loeb 
Ewing C. McBeath 
Donovan J. McCune 
Rustin McIntosh 
Monroe McIver 
H. Houston Merritt 
Edgar G. Miller, Jr. 
Harry S. Mustard 1 
John L. Nickerson 
William Barclay Parsons 
Willard C. Rappleye 
Dickinson W. Richards, Jr. 
Henry A. Riley 
Walter S. Root 
Aura Edward Severinghaus 
Lawrence W. Sloan 
Alan De Forest Smith 
Gilbert P. Smith 
Harry P. Smith 
Philip E. Smith 
Isidore Snapper 
Arthur P. Stout 
Howard C. Taylor, Jr. 
John B. Truslow 
Kenneth B. Turner 
Harry B. van Dyke 
Randolph West 
Abner Wolf 



1 On leave. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N. Associate Dean (Nursing); Professor of Nursing; 

Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921; A.M., 1934; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1925. 

Harriet B. Benedict, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mount Holyoke, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1946. 

H. Virginia Bunn, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1943. 

Katherine W. Burnett, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Oberlin, 1933; B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1944. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Mary Edna Fitzpatrick, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Mercy Hospital, 1930. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Catherine D. Griffin, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nm-sing, 1941. 

Ruth M. Guinter, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

U.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Marionelise Hayes, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945. 

Marguerite P. Jansen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1947; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Florence A. Jensen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Houghton, 1942; A.M., Columbia, 1943; B.S., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1946. 

Doris Johnson Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1932; M.S., 1938. 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; Graduate. Presbyterian. Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1936. 

Ulah Lewis Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Ohio University, 1943. 

Helen G. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, St. Johns General Hospital, 1936. 

Ruth A. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932; A.M., New York University, 1943; B.S., Co- 
lumbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1905; A.M., California, 1910; Ed.D... Harvard, 1924. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933. 

Edith E. Morgan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 1929. 

J. Margaret Ada Mutch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Rosemary Ryan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1927. 

Delphine Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Marguerite Lynn Williams, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Jane Wyatt, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N. . Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Eula W. Rathbun Director of Recreation 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925; A.M., Columbia, 1946. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 
Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Margaret Holden, B.S., A.M., Ph.D Associate in Bacteriology 

CHEMISTRY 

Eleanor M. K. Darby, A.B., M.S., Ph.D .... Research Associate in 

Orthopedic Surgery (Biochemistry) 

MASSAGE 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy 

Department, Vanderbilt Clinic 

PHARMACOLOGY 
Frederick K. Heath, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

NURSING 

Communicable Diseases 

Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat 

Daniel C. Baker, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Assistant Clinical Professor 

of Otolaryngology 

Diseases of the Eye 
Robert R. Chace, Ph.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Instructor in Ophthalmology 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

Gynecological Nursing 

William V. Cavanagh, M.D. . . Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Medical Nursing 

Harry M. Rose, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Neurological Nursing 

Fritz Cramer, M.D Instructor in Neurological Surgery 

L. Vosburgh Lyons, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Edward B. Schlesinger, A.B., M.D Research Assistant in 

Neurological Surgery 
Obstetrical Nursing 

John M. Brush, B.S., M.D. . . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics 
D. Anthony D'Esopo, Ph.B., M.D Professor of Clinical 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Charles M. Steer, A.B., M.D Instructor in 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Orthopedic Nursing 

Everett C. Bragg, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Paul J. Strassburger, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Melvin B. Watkins, A.B., M.D. . . . Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Pediatric Nursing 

Rustin McIntosh, A.B., M.D Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics 

Douglas S. Damrosch, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Surgical Nursing 

Jose M. Ferrer, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Urological Nursing 

Ralph C. Yeaw, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Urology 

Pathology 

Dorothea E. G. Worcester, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Clinical Pathology 
David W. Blood, A.B., M.D Assista?it in Medicine 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Ruth Damerau, B.S., M.S.S. . . . Educational Director, Social Service 

Department, Presbyterian Hospital 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 



OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice-President 

Carll Tucker, Vice-President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice-President 

John Sloane, Vice-President 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 

Bayard W. Read, Assistant Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Secretary 

Thatcher M. Brown, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



Trustees 



Charles E. Adams 
Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Winthrop W. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Edward C. Bench 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
William Sheffield Cowles 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston de Forest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
John M. Franklin 
Artemis L. Gates 
William S. Gray, Jr. 
Peter Grimm 



William E. S. Griswold, Sr. 
W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 
William Hale Harkness 
Walter E. Hope 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
James C. Mackenzie 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Charles S. Munson 
Edgar A. Newberry 
Bayard W. Read 
Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
John Sloane 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
Sidney J. Weinberg 
Mrs. Sheldon Whitehouse 



Honorary Trustees 



Thatcher M. Brown, Sr. 
Percy Chubb, II 
William A. Delane 
George Lauder Greenway 
Charles Barney Harding 
John A. Hartford 
Deering Howe 



J. V. MOLDENHAWER, D.D. 

Charles S. Payson 

H. RlVINGTON PYNE 

Edgar F. Romig, D.D. 
Dean Sage 

William E. Stevenson 
Rev. L. Humphrey Walz 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 9 

Nursing Committee 

Henry C. Alexander, Chairman 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice-Chairman 

Miss Marie C. Byron 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad 

Mrs. Harry N. French 

George H. Humphreys, II, M.D. 

Robert F. Loeb, M.D. 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. 

Mrs. Stephen H. Philbin 

WlLLARD C. RAPPLEYE, M.D. 

John E. Scarff, M.D. 
Alan De Forest Smith, M.D. 
Mrs. Byron Stookey 
Howard C. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 
Mrs. Cyrus R. Vance 
Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 
Mrs. Staunton Williams 
Edwin G. Zabriskie, M.D. 
John S. Parke, ex-officio 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 
Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1932. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 



10 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1929. 

Jane Wyatt, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Phyllis M. Young, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1927. 



HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general 
hospital, offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. 
The Hospital was founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose 
object was the establishment of an institution "for the purpose of affording 
medical and surgical aid and nursing care to sick or disabled persons of every 
creed, nationality and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the 
Presbyterian Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., A.M., was the first 
Director of the School, establishing the plans for administration and instruc- 
tion and guiding it for thirty years. The Board of Managers later added 
the responsibility of affording clinical education for the medical students 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and 
in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia University and Presby- 
terian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present loca- 
tion, on 168th Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of 
Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were 
generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were 
Sloane Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, 
Vanderbilt Clinic, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 
The Institute of Ophthalmology was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility 
for the educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital, under the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is an Associate 
Dean and a member of the Faculty of Medicine. This affiliation marked 
another step in the closer integration of the University and the hospitals 
at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the 
School of Nursing. Two thousand, four hundred and fifty nurses have 
graduated here in this half-century. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and 
the School of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with 
the essentials demanded by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse 
to society. Instruction in the fundamental medical sciences can best be 
given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped laboratories and practice 
rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general and special, 
furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community in 
health or sickness are met during experience in the out-patient department 
and in visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student 
nurse to acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the 
nursing profession. 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The young woman today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open 
to her as she considers her future. 

The spotlight of public opinion is strongly focused on nursing, as the need 
for the services of skilled, intelligent, professional nurses continues. Estimates 
of the probable number required for the maintainance of health services 
throughout the nation, in civilian and veterans hospitals, and in urban and 
rural communities, call for many more professional nurses than are available 
at present. 

The pursuit of nursing as a career is by no means the only significant 
way to use it. A professional education in nursing gives one of the best 
preparations for the varied responsibilities of marriage. Graduate nurses 
have proven themselves to be valuable members of the governing boards 
of many organizations in communities all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should 
evaluate her qualifications candidly and thoroughly. 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any 
physical defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too 
insignificant to mention may be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study 
and practice. 

Academic requirements are outlined on page 15. The School will welcome 
an opportunity to guide its candidates well in advance of the date of entrance. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a 
hospital before entering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities 
for trying out practical "worksamples" of nursing and securing some contact 
with patients, even at an elementary level. Such a procedure furnishes an 
excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for nursing and the seriousness 
of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

The program in nursing at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center 
offers excellent preparation for the countless opportunities which are open 
to registered professional nurses in different fields. The three traditional 
classifications are private duty, institutional nursing, and public health 
nursing. 

Although active recruiting for the Army and Navy Nurse Corps has ceased, 
there are opportunities for important service and influence in a number 
of government services— the Veterans Administration, the Public Health 
Service, the Indian Service, etc. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their 
careers in general duty, advancing into head nurse, supervisory, or teaching 
positions as their experience and achievement warrant. There are many 
opportunities for those who wish to specialize in certain clinical branches 
of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, psychiatry, or orthopedics. 

While the demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in 
the hospital or home) is not so great as formerly, her position has never 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 13 

been more important. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding 
of the possibilities of her vocation in private duty may make a real con- 
tribution, not only in nursing care, but also in health teaching. The private 
duty nurse has a wide influence upon the prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of 
activities which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting 
nursing, school and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational 
and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to 
prepare themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing 
or hospitals, or in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the 
civilian hospital wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the 
tenement, in the industrial plant or the rural community, the modern nurse 
occupies a position of responsibility and honor. She is constantly in contact 
with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the industrial physi- 
cian, and the social worker, as well as with governmental and voluntary 
relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the community. 
American nurses have a large share of responsibility in restoring health and 
welfare services in many parts of the world. The opportunities for service 
increase rather than diminish, both at home and abroad. 



THE NURSING COURSE 
ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSES 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty- 
five and must present a record of good health. All candidates are required 
to make formal application in writing on the blanks supplied by the school. 
After the application has been submitted, the academic record of the 
candidate will be secured by the Department of Nursing from the college 
or high school. Students entering from high school should present a general 
average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their school, together 
with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such specific 
requirement is made for college students, preference is always given to those 
who have shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final 
approval to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. 
An official transcript of the academic record must also be submitted to the 
New York State Education Department, since all students in registered 
schools of nursing must be approved by the Department. This form is 
known as The Application for Qualifying Certificate and is furnished by 
the New York State Education Department to the School of Nursing. All 
necessary instructions will be given with this blank. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for 
the physical examination by the school physician will be made, probably 
within six months of the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary 
interview and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all require- 
ments at the time of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate 
withdrawal. She should, therefore, come financially prepared to return home 
in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final 
acceptance. 

APPLICATION BLANKS 

Application blanks and any further information about the course in nursing 
may be secured from the Associate Dean (Nursing), Faculty of Medicine, 
Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program 
of Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are 
registered as University students. The course includes instruction in the 
basic sciences, theory and practice of nursing techniques, and clinical 
experience in medical, surgical, obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, 
and various specialties and electives in the Presbyterian Hospital and 
affiliated institutions. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the 
basic course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had 
previous college education are expected to maintain a higher level of achieve- 
ment, both in the classroom and on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in 
separate sections. 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic course under one of the following 
classifications: 

Group A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Colum- 
bia University and to the New York State Education Department may 
register with advanced time credit of eight months, completing the course 
in two years and four months. Such students are considered candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. Courses in 
natural sciences including chemistry, psychology, and sociology should be 
included in the college courses. 

Group B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years 
of study in a college approved by Columbia University and the New York 
State Education Department may register for the basic course in nursing to 
be completed in three years. Such students are considered candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. The sixty points in 
liberal arts required for admission on this basis should include chemistry, 
biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is frequently referred to as 
a five-year course— two years in a college or university elsewhere and three 
years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, 
acceptable to Columbia University and the New York State Education De- 
partment, and who show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in 
sixteen units of subject matter, including those who have completed college 
study not meeting the requirements outlined under A and B, may register for 
the three-year basic course, receiving the diploma in nursing upon com- 
pletion. Students entering on this basis must meet the requirements for a 
nurse student qualifying certificate as prescribed by the New York State 
Education Department and the requirements for entrance to the School of 
Nursing as follows: 

English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry and either biology or 
general science); mathematics, 1 unit; history or social studies, 2 
units; electives, 7 units in 2- or 3-unit sequences in languages or the 
above required subjects. A total of 16 units is required, and the 
University allows no credit for commercial or home economics 
courses. 
It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should 
be approved by the University before final selections axe made. Applicants 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

should therefore communicate with the Associate Dean, Department of Nurs- 
ing, two years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank giving 
such information as may be required. Registration takes place in Maxwell 
Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on the first Friday 
in September. 

EXPENSES 

A fee of $10 must accompany every application. This is not refunded in 
case the applicant is not accepted. 

The University fee of $20 for the academic year or fraction thereof is 
payable each year on the day of registration in September. The application 
fee is credited on the University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the beginning 
of the first year and $200 at the beginning of the second year. Students tak- 
ing the course as candidates for the diploma pay a tuition fee of $250 in two 
installments: $125 at the beginning of the first year and $125 at the beginning 
of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating 
the probable cost of the course in nursing (see page 15 for classification). The 
cost of the college study preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group 
B will depend entirely upon the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $ 10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 200 200 125 

Second tuition 200 200 125 

University fees 40 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 

$470 $480 $310 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to 
Columbia University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reason- 
able amount of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the 
student provides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding 
approximately $75 to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are pro- 
vided by the Hospital. All necessary textbooks and instruments are also 
supplied by the Hospital. 

A fee of $3.00 will be charged for each deficiency examination, payable 
before the examination. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Twenty dollars per month has 
been found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, 
for student nurses in this school. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing 
gives a limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to 
students whose record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, 
whose health is excellent, and who are making a contribution to the social 
life of the School. These scholarships are not open to students until they 
have been in the School for six months. 

University stipends or grants in aid are available to students in need of 
financial assistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted in 
amounts of $50 and $100. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship covers the cost of tuition and University fees 
for a degree candidate during her three years in the School. This scholarship 
has been given in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President of the Presby- 
terian Hospital Board of Trustees, by his family. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow rea- 
sonable amounts without interest at any time after the first term. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in 
writing to the Associate Dean, Department of Nursing. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves 
further for work in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. 
Those who receive the degree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the 
nursing courses may work toward a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive 
the diploma only may complete the work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master of 
Science degree, are offered by the Department of Nursing to graduate nurses 
who hold acceptable bachelor's degrees and who have had satisfactory 
experience. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for 
a degree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matric- 
ulated student of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character 
and health as well as on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a 
student of the University during the session for which she is registered unless 
her connection with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or 
otherwise. No student registered in any school or college of the University 
shall at the same time be registered in any other school or college, either of 
Columbia University or of any other institution, without the consent of the 
appropriate Dean or Director. 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the 
Department of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be 
unsuited to the conditions of study in the Department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the 
receipt by her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any 
degree or the granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary 
powers of the University, which is free to cancel her registration at any time 
on any grounds which it deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the 
University is vested in the President in such cases as he deems proper, and, 
subject to the reserved powers of the President, in the Dean of each Faculty 
and the Director of the work of each Administrative Board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good 
academic standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw 
from the University; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall 
be entitled to a discharge without the assent of her parent or guardian fur- 
nished in writing to the Dean. Students withdrawing are required to notify 
the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reason of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student 
in good standing. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, 
according to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State 
of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. A deficiency examination 
will be required of every student failing to receive a passing grade (75 percent) 
in any course. Failure to obtain a passing grade will be sufficient reason for 
asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from the School. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of 
Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily 
completed the prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are 
recommended by the Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the 
University degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian 
Hospital, upon recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation 
exercises at which the Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in 
the Presbyterian Hospital gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Associ- 
ation of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of 
New York; and together with her state license to practice nursing (R.N.) 
it entitles her to membership in the American Nurses Association. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational require- 
ments of the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. 
Having met these requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examina- 
tions of the Board of Regents. These examinations are held four times a year 
(January, April, July, and October) under the direction of the Department of 
Education of New York State. After passing these examinations the graduate 
nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse (R.N.). Graduates of the 
nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center are eligible for 
examination for registration. 

According to the law in New York State, only those persons who have filed 
intentions of becoming United States citizens may be admitted to the exam- 
inations for license to practice as registered nurses. Candidates who are not 
citizens should discuss this question carefully before filing application papers 
for entrance to the School. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

TEACHING EQUIPMENT 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located 
in the main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a 
lantern screen. Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory 
equipped for teaching purposes. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the 
School of Medicine are available for instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, 
chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna 
C. Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell 
Reference Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest 
editions of approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicne 
of Columbia University is available to those desiring advanced professional 
study. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Associ- 
ation with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and 
officers. A periodical known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the 
students. Other activities include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, 
forum club, orchestra, and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of 
the swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction 
of the Recreational Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, correc- 
tive gymnastics, and tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual 
needs and interests of the student and to provide a wise use of leisure time. 
It is a recreational rather than a classroom program, but each student is 
required to participate in one or more of these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

in the city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intel- 
lectual pursuits. 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence 
Hall of the School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construc- 
tion overlooking the Hudson River and is connected by an underground 
passage with the other buildings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recre- 
ation facilities, the dining room, and study hall are located in this building. 
Two new wings were added in 1945, increasing both the housing capacity 
and the library facilities. There are ten bedroom floors, accommodating 
450 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort 
has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome 
living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the 
Residence Hall during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of the students and hospital staff the University 
Bookstore maintains a branch in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Room 2-463, extension 7265. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and 
all other student supplies. Substantial savings are effected whenever manu- 
facturers and publishers permit. The store is open daily all year. 

HEALTH 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of 
hours of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever 
necessary, by the school physician, together with any laboratory investigation 
which may be indicated. All students have x-ray examination of the chest and 
tuberculin test at yearly intervals. Vaccinations with Bacillus Calmette Guerin 
(BCG) will be advised for those students whose tuberculin test is negative. 
The written consent of parents will be required before vaccination with BCG, 
as the procedure is optional. 

Within reasonable limits, students when ill are cared for by the Hospital 
and treated gratuitously by the school physician or surgeon. Each student 
will be expected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care and eye 
refraction. 

Students are required to make up time lost through illness in excess of 
thirty days and all time lost for any other cause whatsoever. 

Fifteen days will be allowed each student who maintains a perfect health 
and attendance record, including attendance at classes. 

A student entering with the eight months' credit for her college degree 
will be allowed twenty days' illness and an additional ten days for perfect 
attendance including classes. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

VACATION 

A vacation of ten weeks is allowed each student; one week at Christmas 
during the preliminary term, four weeks each year during the first and second 
years and one week in the third year. To the student entering with eight 
months' credit for her college degree, six weeks' vacation is allowed; one week 
at Christmas, four weeks at the end of the first year and one week in the last 
year. The dates at which vacations are given are subject to the necessities 
of the School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each 
student may attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. 
Morning prayers are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are 
required to attend. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except 
those entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. 
(See page 15.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is 
required of the student, except for teaching purposes. All instruction study 
and practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following 
this period of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the 
general care of the sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to 
the student a basis for deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection 
of nursing as a profession, and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. 
If she meets the requirements, she receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and 
practical work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student 
is on duty eight hours a day for six days weekly including the time spent in 
classrooms. Class attendance time on days off duty is made up on Sunday. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite 
periods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several 
advantages: the students are not on night duty while going to class; the time 
spent in class is included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of 
hours on the ward and the responsibilities given are decreased; and in 
planning the students' experience in the various services, especially affilia- 
tions and vacations, the outline of the block system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards, 
where the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of 
nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose 
and throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in 
obstetrics at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hos- 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

pital are provided for each student. In the special services the classes are 
correlated with the practical experience. 

Clinics at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards 
once a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each 
student writes one nursing care study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient 
department of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each 
student during her two months' service there. Supervision of this teaching 
program is assigned to a special instructor. Field trips to various welfare 
agencies and institutions are arranged. Two weeks of instruction and observa- 
tion public health nursing is part of every student's experience in connection 
with her Out-Patient Department Service. During this period, attention is 
focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health 
service, and the function of the public health nurse is interpreted, both in 
action and in conference. 

College graduates with advanced time credit spend two months at the 
Institute of Living in Hartford, Conn., for the study and practice of 
psychiatric nursing. 

A three months' affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New 
York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given 
to all students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those 
completing the course in less than three years. 

An affiliation of eight weeks in communicable disease nursing is given at 
Willard Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of students 
annually. 

Special clinical experience is offered to a limited number of students at 
the Mary Harkness Convalescent Home and New York Orthopedic Hospital 
and Dispensary, both of which are units of the Medical Center. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology. One hundred and five hours. Professor 
Rogers and Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and 
systems of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and micro- 
scopic specimens. Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Microbiology. Thirty hours. Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, 
sterilization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and com- 
mon pathogenic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Chemistry. Including drugs and solutions. Seventy-five hours. Dr. 
Darby and Miss Gill. 

A course in applied chemistry as related to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, materia 
medica, and the clinical subjects in nursing. The unit of drugs and solutions presupposes 
knowledge of simple arithmetic and includes practice in using the metric system of weights 
and measures, the apothecary system, and the calculation and preparation of solutions com- 
monly used in nursing. A study of the terms and symbols used in materia medica and an 
introduction to the study of drugs, pharmaceutical preparations used on the wards, and the 
accurate administration of the drugs are included. Laboratory work, including demonstrations, 
supplemented by class discussion and lecture. 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Rathbun. 

A discussion of recreation, relaxation, study and work schedules, mental attitudes, and per- 
sonal hygiene essentials for the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health as a factor 
in balanced, successful living. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Rathbun. 

An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk 
dancing, team sports, and hiking: to assist the student to select an activity which she will 
enjoy pursuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are 
elective after the Winter Session. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Hamon. 

An elementary course in Community Health responsibilities. In the first half various aspects 
of sanitation, as water supply, milk supply, and sewage disposal are studied in their relation 
to health. The second part of the course surveys the voluntary and official agencies for the 
control and advancement of health. Field trips are included. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Miss Johnson and Miss Lewis. 

Nutrition : A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. 
Foods are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is 
studied and traced through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis 
is placed upon the standards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant 
supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. 
In the preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food 
value. The lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a 
breakfast are prepared in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given 
to size of servings, temperature of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the 
tray. In planning the meals the economic factor is stressed and low cost meals are prepared. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsi- 
bilities of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional 
management which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is 
given to professional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, 
physicians, and co-workers. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Elementary Nursing Practice (One Hundred and Eighty Hours) 

Principles and practice of nursing. One hundred and five hours. Pro- 
fessor Pettit, Miss Griffin, Miss Ryan, and Miss Lynch. 

This course consists of demonstrations of nursing procedures and the explanation of the 
underlying principles. The demonstrations include bed-making, baths, care of the patient's 
surroundings, simple treatments, etc. In all of the classes emphasis is placed on the patient 
and the attitude of the student nurse toward the patient. Parallel with these demonstrations 
there is supervised practice in the classrooms throughout the course and on the wards during 
the last half of the session. 

Hospital economics. Thirty-five hours. Miss Ryan. 

This course deals with special details of hospital construction and equipment as related 
to efficiency of service, interior furnishings and finishings, heating, ventilating, lighting, and 
plumbing systems. Topics include cleaning processes, disposal of garbage and waste, refrigera- 
tion, purpose and plan of laundry, linen, and surgical supply rooms. The system of distribution 
of linen and surgical supplies is studied. 

Bandaging. Twenty-five hours. Miss Griffin. 

This course is planned to give a comprehension of the fundamental principles of good 
bandaging, as a basis for all future practice in connection with surgical and orthopedic work, 
and to develop a certain degree of manual dexterity and skill in the application of the 
simpler bandages. 

Principles of massage. Ten hours. Miss Hansen. 

A study of the history, nomenclature, and fundamental manipulations of massage, its 
physiological effect and therapeutic use. The work includes class practice of general and local 
massage, and observation in the physical therapy clinic. 

SPRING SESSION 

General Medical and Surgical Nursing (Sixty Hours) 

Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Professor Rose and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative 
types of diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations 
of special types of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on 
the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Ferrer and Miss Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the 
principal surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes 
or demonstrations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented 
by ward clinics held each week on the surgical service. 



Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Drs. Worcester and Blood. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of 
clinical diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstra- 
tions, class discussions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in 
tissues. The course is closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 

Pharmacology. Thirty hours. Dr. Heath and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their thera- 
peutic action, emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the 
observation of their effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and 
include demonstrations of the action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Johnson. 

This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the 
basis for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the 
diet to the patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 

Advanced nursing practice. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit, Miss 
Lynch, and Miss Ryan. 

In this course the advanced nursing procedures applied to medical and surgical nursing are 
demonstrated by the instructor. These demonstrations are followed by supervised practice in 
the classroom as well as on the wards. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human 
behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic understanding of the motives of 
conduct with particular application to nursing. 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Specialties (Sixty Hours) 
Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Cavanagh. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Yeaw. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of disease of the genitourinary tract. Each 
student has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of 
teaching is given. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Professor 
Baker. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, 
and throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Chace and Miss Wright. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases 
and their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of 
Ophthalmology. Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Miss Jansen and Miss Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: 
the equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various 
materials used in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study 
during her two months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures 
on anesthesia. 

Surgical emergencies. Five hours. Miss Griffin. 

A study of the principles and practice of intelligent first-aid treatment in the surgical 
emergencies, including those encountered in special .lelds of nursing such as industry and 
camp as well as in daily life. Prevention of accidents and improvising of equipment are 
emphasized. The course is based on courses outlined by the American National Red Cross. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. 
Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recog- 
nition of symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and 
opportunities for preventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isola- 
tion technique are given by nurse instructors. 

Orthopedic nursing. Five hours. Drs. Bragg, Strassburger, Watkins. 

Lectures covering the most common orthopedic conditions and their nursing care. 

Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental 
and physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally 
ill patients. The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special 



26 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

emphasis on the part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New 
York State Psychiatric Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and oc- 
cupational therapy are conducted. Field trips are arranged to the Children's Court of Domestic 
Relations and institutions concerned with aspects of mental hygiene, mental illness, and 
rehabilitation. 

History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing 
traditions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the 
people and influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are 
illustrated by lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Social service conferences. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

A series of conferences has been arranged with the educational director of the Social Service 
Department. The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors 
which have an important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. 
Methods of teaching include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and col- 
lateral reading discussed in class. 

Nursing arts. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit. 

This course consists of projects arranged by the students themselves. The instructor selects 
certain of the more important procedures previously taught. Each student gives one demon- 
stration and discussion to the class and instructor. One aim of this course is to prepare the 
student nurse to meet situations in nursing outside the hospital, using such equipment as is 
found in a home. 

Professional adjustments. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. 
Class discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise 
in the student's experience. 

THIRD YEAR 

Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. Professor Allanach, Miss Fitz- 
patrick and members of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Lectures and clinics by obstetricians and classes, and demonstrations by nurse instructors 
parallel to the clinical experience on the obstetrical service (12 weeks). 

Pediatric nursing. Forty-five hours. Professor Peto, Miss Kent, Miss 
Burnett and members of the Department of Pediatrics. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal 
conditions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick 
children. The students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to 
supervision of practice on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse 
instructors, dietitians, and a nursery school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units 
of the Medical Center. 

The course is parallel to the clinical experience on the pediatric service, covering a 12-week 
period. 

Survey of the nursing fields and related professional problems. Thirty 
hours. 

The lectures of this course are given by representatives of different fields of health work, 
stating their main problems and responsibilities. The object of the course is to introduce the 
student nurse to the varied branches of nursing and the responsibilities of one graduate nurse. 
Special emphasis is placed on the international aspects of nursing. 




William F. Wolfe 

THE GRADUATING CLASS MARCHING FROM THE COMMENCEMENT 

EXERCISES 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED 
AT ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 




MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS 

PI<mof23mtdinfls<»>«i Qrounds 





U4-th Street 



"tlTic darkness Academic Theater* 



COXUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
BUJ^JETIN OF INFORMATION 

Forty-nintk/Series, No. 23 June 18,1949 






ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

i THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1949-1950 





COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

63O WEST l68TH STREET • NEW YORK 32, N.Y. 



Columbia UntberSitp bulletin of information 

Forty-ninth Series, No. 23 June 18, 1949 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly from 
January for forty consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter February 7, 1949, 
at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 191 2. Acceptance for 
mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section n 03, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to the Trustees, and the Announcements 
of the several Colleges and Schools relating to the work of the next year. These are made 
as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon application 
to the Office of University Admissions. 

C. U. P. 7,700 — 1949. 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
1949-1950 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

630 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 

Faculty of Medicine 3 

Officers of Instruction 4 

Presbyterian Hospital 9 

Officers 9 

Administrative Staff, Nursing Service 10 

History of the School of Nursing 12 

Choice of a Profession 12 

Careers in Nursing 13 

Nursing Course 15 

Application 15 

Basic Course 15 

Admission 16 

Registration 16 

Expenses 17 

Scholarships, Stipends, and Loans 17 

Graduate Study 18 

General Regulations 18 

General Information 20 

Plan of Instruction 21 

Clinical Experience 22 

Courses of Instruction 24 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 







Wurts Brothers 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Dwight David Eisenhower, LL.D President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D. .... Dean; Vice President 

in Charge of Medical Affairs 
Aura Edward Severinghaus, B.S., A.M., Ph.D. Associate Dean and Secretary 
*Harry Stoll Mustard, B.S., LL.D., M.D. . Associate Dean {Public Health) 

'Bion R. East, D.D.S Associate Dean {Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Margaret Elizabeth Conrad, A.B., Sc.D. . . Associate Dean {Nursing) 

John Bacchus Truslow, A.B., M.D. Assistant Dean {Graduate Studies) 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana W. Atchley 
Frank B. Berry 
James Bordley 
Harold W. Brown 
Charles L. Buxton 
George F. Cahill 
A. Benson Cannon 
Hans T. Clark 
Margaret E. Conrad 
Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
D. Anthony D'Esopo 
Samuel R. Detwiler 
John H. Dunnington 
Bion R. East 1 
Earl T. Engle 
Thomas T. Fleming 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 
Angus M. Frantz 
Alfred Gilman 
Ross Golden 
Magnus I. Gregersen 
Alexander B. Gutman 

CUSHMAN D. HAAGERSEN 

Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Houghton Holliday 
George H. Humphreys, II 
Claus W. Jungeblut 
Yale Kneeland, Jr. 
Nolan D. C. Lewis 



John S. Lockwood 
Robert F. Loeb 
Ewing C. McBeath 
Donovan J. McCune 
Rustin McIntosh 
Monroe McIver 
Irville H. MacKinnon 
H. Houston Merritt 
Edgar G. Miller, Jr. 
Pablo Morales-Otero 
Harry S. Mustard 1 
John L. Nickerson 
William Barclay Parsons 
J. Lawrence Pool 
Willard C. Rappleye 
Dickinson W. Richards, Jr. 
Henry A. Riley 
Walter S. Root 
Aura Edward Severinghaus 
Lawrence W. Sloan 
Alan De Forest Smith 
Gilbert P. Smith 
Harry P. Smith 
Philip E. Smith 
Isidore Snapper 
Arthur P. Stout 
Howard C. Taylor, Jr. 
John B. Truslow 
Kenneth B. Turner 
Harry B. van Dyke 
Randolph West 
Abner Wolf 



1 On leave 1949-1950. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N. . Associate Dean (Nursing); Professor of Nursing; 

Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917; Sc.D., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

1 Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; A.M., New York University, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921; A.M., 1934; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1925. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1927. 

Lillian C. Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hunter, 1942 ; B.S., Columbia, 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
I945- 

H. Virginia Bunn, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1943. 

Beth L. Cameron, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

Lydia Clay, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Newton Hospital School of Nursing, 1934. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Edna L. Danielsen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

1 On leave 1949-1950. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Grace E. Davidson, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Minnesota, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Catherine D. Griffin, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

Ruth M. Guinter, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Iva E. Haruda, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Oak Park Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Marguerite P. Jansen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1947; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Florence A. Jensen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Houghton, 1942; A.M., Columbia, 1943; B.S., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1946. 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1936. 

Ulah Lewis Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Ohio, 1943. 

Ruth A. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932; A.M., New York University, 1943; B.S., Colum- 
bia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1905; A.M., California, 1910; Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933. 

Susan B. Moore, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.A., American, 1939; B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1943. 

Edith E. Morgan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 1929. 

Sarah M. Reuss, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Notre Dame of Maryland, 1944; Graduate, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1948. 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Virginia M. Vivian Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1945 ; M.S., Columbia, 1947. 

Delphine Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

2 Marguerite Lynn Williams, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Jane Wyatt, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 



Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Charlotte H. Gleeson, R.N Infirmary Nurse 

Bushwick Hospital, School of Nursing, 1919. 

Eula W. Rathbun Recreational Director 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925; A.M., Columbia, 1946. 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 
Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

CHEMISTRY 

Blanche A. Prescott, A.B., M.S. . Assistant in the Department of Biochemistry 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 
Girard J. Craft, B.S., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

MEDICAL NURSING 
Stuart W. Cosgriff, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Margaret Holden, B.S., A.M., Ph.D Associate in Bacteriology 

2 On leave July 1, 1949, to May 31, 1950. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

NURSING IN MEDICAL AND SURGICAL SPECIALTIES 

Communicable Disease 
Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Saul B. Gusberg, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ophthalmology 
Robert R. Chace, Ph.B., M.D., Med.ScD Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Orthopedics 

Everett C. Bragg, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Paul J. Strassburger, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Melvin B. Watkins, A.B., M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Otolaryngology 

Daniel C. Baker, Jr., A.B., M.D., Med.ScD Assistant Clinical Professor 

of Otolaryngology 
Urology 

John K. Lattimer, A.B., M.D., Med.ScD Instructor in Urology 

PATHOLOGY 

Alfred M. Keirle, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

PHARMACOLOGY 
Frederick K. Heath, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy 

Department, Vanderbilt Clinic 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 
Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

NEUROLOGICAL NURSING 

Fritz Cramer, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

L. Vosburgh Lyons, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Daniel Sciarra, M.D Instructor in Neurology 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

OBSTETRICAL NURSING 

Equinn W. Munnell, A.B., M.D. . . . Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Harold Speert, A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles M. Steer, A.B., M.D., Med.Sc.D. . Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Susan Williamson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

Douglas S. Damrosch, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

foHN Tuthill, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

SURGICAL NURSING 
Jose M. Ferrer, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 

Mercedes Geyer Acting Director, Social Service 

Department, Presbyterian Hospital 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice President 

Carll Tucker, Vice President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice President 

John Sloane, Vice President 

Henry C. Alexander, Vice President 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 

Edward C. Bench, Assistant Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Secretary 

Thatcher M. Brown, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



Trustees 



Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Winthrop W. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Edward C. Bench 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
William Sheffield Cowles 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston de Forest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
John M. Franklin 
Artemis L. Gates 
William S. Gray 
Peter Grimm 



William E. S. Griswold, Sr. 
W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 
William Hale Harkness 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
James C. Mackenzie 
Samuel W. Meek 
Dunlevy Milbank 
Charles S. Munson 
Edgar A. Newberry 
Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
John Sloane 
John P. Stevens, Jr. 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
Sidney J. Weinberg 
Mrs. Sheldon Whitehouse 



Honorary Trustees 



Charles E. Adams 
Thatcher M. Brown, Sr. 
William A. Delano 
George Lauder Greenway 
Charles Barney Harding 
John A. Hartford 
Rev. John O. Mellin 



Charles S. Payson 

H. Rivington Pyne 

Bayard W. Read 

Edgar F. Romig, D.D. 

Dean Sage 

Rev. L. Humphrey Walz 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing Committee 

Henry C. Alexander, Chairman Mrs. Grover O'Neill 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice Chairman John S. Parke, cx-officio 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice Chairman Mrs. Stephen Philein 

Miss Marie C. Byron J. Lawrence Pool, M.D. 

Mrs. Benjamin Coates Willard C. Rappleye, M.D. 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 

George H. Humphreys II, M.D. Mrs. Byron Stookey 

Robert F. Loeb, M.D. Howard C. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 

H. Houston Merritt, M.D. Mrs. Staunton Williams 
Mrs. Stanley G. Mortimer 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917; Sc.D., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1. 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

^elen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; A.M., New York University, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932. 

A. Beatrice Langmuir, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

1 On leave 1949-1950. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING n 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1929. 

Jane Wyatt, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Phyllis M. Young, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927. 



HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospi- 
tal, offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital 
was founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose objective was the 
establishment of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical 
aid and nursing care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality, and 
color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., A.M., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for thirty 
years. The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia Uni- 
versity and Presbyterian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 
168th Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. 
Harkness and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to 
the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane 
Hospital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and 
the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthal- 
mology was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibilitv for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a Professor of Nursing who is an Associate Dean and a member of 
the Faculty of Medicine. This affiliation marked another step in the closer integra- 
tion of the University and the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical 
Center. 

The year 1942 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the School of 
Nursing. Over twenty-five hundred nurses have been graduated since the opening 
of the School. 

The program of education formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to combine the best nursing traditions with the essentials demanded 
by the present wide responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the fun- 
damental medical sciences can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well- 
equipped laboratories and practice rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, 
both general and special, furnish a wealth of clinical material. The problems of the 
community in health or sickness are met during experience in the outpatient depart- 
ment and in visiting nursing. A real opportunity, therefore, is open for the student 
nurse to acquire the knowledge and skill needed for a firm foundation in the nurs- 
ing profession. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The young woman today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open to her 
as she considers her future. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 13 

The spotlight of public opinion is strongly focused on nursing as the need for the 
services of skilled, intelligent professional nurses continues. Estimates of the prob- 
able number required for the maintainance of health services throughout the 
nation, in civilian and veterans hospitals and in urban and rural communides, call 
for many more professional nurses than are available at present. 

The pursuit of nursing as a career is by no means the only significant way to use 
it. A professional education in nursing affords one of the best preparations for the 
varied responsibilities of marriage. Graduate nurses have proven themselves to 
be valuable members of governing boards of many organizations in communities 
all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly. 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical 
defect is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to 
mention may be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements are outlined on page 16. The School will welcome an 
opportunity to guide its candidates well in advance of the date of entrance. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a hospital before 
entering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities for trying out practical 
"worksamples" of nursing and securing some contact with patients, even at an 
elementary level. Such a procedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving 
one's fitness for nursing and the seriousness of one's interest in the problems of 
health and welfare. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

The program in nursing at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center offers 
excellent preparation for the countless opportunities which are open to registered 
professional nurses in different fields. The three traditional classifications are private 
duty, institutional nursing, and public health nursing. 

Although active recuiting for the Army and Navy Nurse Corps has ceased, there 
are opportunities for important service and influence in a number of government 
services — the Veterans Administration, the Public Health Service, the Indian Serv- 
ice, etc. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin thier careers in 
general duty, advancing into head-nursing, supervisory, or teaching positions as 
their experience and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those 
who wish to specialize in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, 
obstetrics, psychiatry, or orthopedics. 

While the demand for the private-duty nurse (caring for one patient in the 
hospital or home) is not as great as formerly, her position has never been more 
important. A keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities 
of her vocation in private duty may make a real contribution not only in nursing 
care but also in health teaching. The private-duty nurse has a wide influence upon 
the prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school 
and industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 



14 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare 
themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, 
or in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in army or navy hospitals, in the civilian 
hospital wards, or in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the 
industrial plant or the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of 
responsibility and honor. She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, 
die public health officer, the industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as 
with governmental and voluntary relief agencies and others concerned with the 
health of the community. American nurses have a large share of responsibility in 
restoring health and welfare services in many parts of the world. The opportunities 
for service increase rather than diminish both at home and abroad. 



THE NURSING COURSE 
ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSES 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and 
must present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal 
application in writing on blanks supplied by the school. After the application has 
been submitted, the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing from the college or high school attended. It is desirable to make 
application at least one year in advance of the date of desired entrance. Students 
entering from high school should present a general average of at least ten points 
above the passing mark of their school, together with a standing in the upper third 
of their class. While no such specific requirement is made for college students, pref- 
erence is always given to those who have shown evidence of ability and achieve- 
ment. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official tran- 
script of the academic record may be required by the New York State Education 
Department, since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved 
by the Department. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the 
physical examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six 
months of the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the 
time of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She 
should, therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation 
arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final 
acceptance. 

APPLICATION BLANKS 

Application blanks and any further information about the course in nursing may 
be sscured from the Associate Dean (Nursing), Faculty of Medicine, Columbia 
University, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of 
Columbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered 
as University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences; theory 
and practice of nursing techniques; and clinical experience in medical, surgical, 
obstetric, and pediatric nursing, nutrition, and various specialties and electives 
in the Presbyterian Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic 
course is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

education are expected to mantain a higher level of achievement, both in the class- 
room and on the wards. 

After die preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic courses under one of the following 
classifications: 

Group A. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia 
University and to the New York State Education Department may register with 
advanced time credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four 
months. Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science as well as for die diploma. Courses in natural science including chemistry, 
psychology, and sociology should be included in the college courses. 

Group B. Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study 
in a college approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education 
Department may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three 
years. Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
as well as for the diploma. The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission 
on this basis should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This 
program is frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or 
university elsewhere and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C. Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable 
to Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject mat- 
ter, including those who have completed college study not meeting the require- 
ments outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiv- 
ing the diploma in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must 
meet the requirements as prescribed by the New York State Education Depart- 
ment and the requirements for entrance to die School of Nursing as follows: 

English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry and eidier biology or general 
science); mathematics, 1 unit (algebra or geometry); history or social 
studies, 2 units; electives, 7 units in 2- or 3-unit sequences in languages or 
the above required subjects. A total of 16 units is required, and the Univer- 
sity allows no credit for commercial or home economics courses. 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study should be 
approved by the University before final selections are made. Applicants should 
therefore communicate with the Associate Dean, Department of Nursing, two 
years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank giving such 
information as may be required. Registration takes place in Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort 
Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on die first Fridav in September. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

EXPENSES 

The application fee of $10 is payable with the application. It covers the cost of 
assembling credentials and of the physical examination and aptitude tests, the 
results of which determine the candidate's eligibility. This fee is not returnable 
regardless of the action taken on the application for admission. 

The University fee of $20 for the academic year or fraction thereof is payable 
each year on the day of registration in September. The application fee is credited 
on the University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the beginning of the first year 
and $200 at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candi- 
dates for the diploma pay a tuition fee of $250 in two installments: $125 at the 
beginning of the first year and $125 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating die 
probable cost of the course in nursing (see page 16 for classification). The cost of 
the college study preceding entrance to die nursing course in Group B will depend 
entirely upon die institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $ 10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 200 200 125 

Second tuition 200 200 125 

University fees 40 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 ... 

$470 $480 $310 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia 
University. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable 
amount of laundry without charge. During die preliminary period the student 
provides her own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately 
$75 to the above totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. 
All necessary textbooks and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

A fee of $3.00 will be charged for each deficiency examination, payable before 
the examination. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Twenty dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student 
nurses in the school. 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives 
a limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students 
whose record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is 
excellent, and who are making a contribution to die social life of the School. These 
scholarships are not open to students until they have been in the School for six 
months. 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

University stipends or grants-in-aid are available to students in need of financial 
assistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted in amounts of $50 
and $100. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship covers the cost of tuition and University fees for a 
degree candidate during her three years in the School. This scholarship has been 
given in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President of the Presbyterian Hospital 
Board of Trustees, by his family. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow reasonable 
amounts without interest at any time after the first term. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in writing to 
the Associate Dean, Department of Nursing. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, 
offers to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work 
in the nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the 
degree of Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work 
toward a Master of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may complete 
the work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master of Science 
degree, are offered by the Department of Nursing to graduate nurses who hold 
acceptable bachelor's degrees and who have had satisfactory experience. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a 
degree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated 
student of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health 
as well as on the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the session for which she is registered unless her con- 
nection with the Universky is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No 
student registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time 
be registered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any 
other institution, without the consent of the appropriate dean or director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Depart- 
ment of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the 
conditions of study in the Department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the 
University, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on anv grounds 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

which it deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested 
in the President in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserved 
powers of the President, in the dean of each faculty and the director of the work 
of each administrative board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge 
without the assent of her parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. Stu- 
dents withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reason of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in good 
standing. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, accord- 
ing to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. A deficiency examination will be 
required of every student failing to receive a passing grade (75 percent) in any 
course. Failure to obtain a passing grade will be sufficient reason for asking a student 
to repeat the course or to resign from the School. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor 
of Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed die 
prescribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the 
Faculty of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which die 
Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital 
gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York; and 
together with her state license to practice nursing (R.N.) it entitles her to member- 
ship in the American Nurses Association. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements 
of the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met 
these requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of 
Regents. These examinations are held four times a year (January, April, July, and 
October) under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. 
After passing these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Profes- 
sional Nurse (R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian 
Medical Center are eligible for examination for registration. 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

According to the law in New York State, only those persons who have filed inten- 
tions of becoming United States citizens may be admitted to the examinations for 
license to practice as registered nurses. Candidates who are not citizens should dis- 
cuss this question carefully before filing application papers for entrance to the 
School. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the Residence Hall of 
the School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlook- 
ing the Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other 
buildings of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining 
room, and study hall are located in this building. Two new wings were added in 
1945, increasing both the housing capacity and the library facilities. There are ten 
bedroom floors, accommodating 450 students. Each student has a single room with 
running water. Every effort has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and 
provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the Resi- 
dence Hall during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours 
of sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indi- 
cated. All students have X-ray examinations of the chest and tuberculin tests at yearly 
intervals. Vaccinations with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) will be advised for 
those students whose tuberculin test is negative. The written consent of parents 
will be required before vaccination with BCG, as the procedure is optional. 

Students are under the care of the school physician or surgeon during their regis- 
tration in the School. Within reasonable limits, the hospital assumes the cost of 
medical care. Each student will be expected, however, to meet the expenses of any 
dental care and eye refraction. 

VACATION 

A vacation of ten weeks is allowed each student: one week at Christmas during 
the preliminary term; four weeks each year during the first and second years; and 
one week in the third year. To the student entering with eight months' credit for 
her college degree, six weeks' vacation is allowed: one week at Christmas; four 
weeks at the end of the first year; and one week in the last year. The dates at which 
vacations are given are subject to the necessities of the School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers 
are held each day, and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A periodi- 
cal known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other activities 
include a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, and Bible 
study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the 
swimming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recrea- 
tional Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and 
tennis. The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the 
student and to provide a wise use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a 
classroom program, but each student is required to participate in one or more of 
these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the 
city of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. 

TEACHING FACILITIES 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. 
Instruction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching 
purposes. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are avail- 
able for instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and path- 
ology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference 
Library Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of 
approved reference books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia Uni- 
versity is available to those desiring advanced professional study. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

The Medical Center Bookstore, located on the second floor of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, is maintained for the convenience of the students and 
staff of the Medical Center schools and hospitals. The store carries a full stock of 
textbooks and all other student supplies. Substantial savings are effected when- 
ever the rules of manufacturers and publishers permit. The store is open on week- 
days from 8:45 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 8:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 



PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 16.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is re- 
quired of the student except for teaching purposes. All instruction study and 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

practice take place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period 
of intensive study, the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the 
sick on the wards. One month of this experience gives to the student a basis for 
deciding whether or not she is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession, 
and an opportunity to indicate her fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she 
receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practi- 
cal work on the wards will be continued coordinately. Each student is on duty eight 
hours a day for six days weekly including the time spent in classrooms. Class attend- 
ance time on off-duty days is made up on Sunday. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite 
periods, has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advan- 
tages; the students are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in 
class is included in the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the 
ward and the responsibilities given are decreased; and in planning the students' 
experience in the various services, especially affiliations and vacations, the outline of 
the block system is used. 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards where 
the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months' experience in obstetrics 
at Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are provided 
for each student. In the special services the classes are correlated with the practical 
experience. 

Clinics at which attendance is required, are given by doctors on the wards once 
a week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes 
one nursing care study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the outpatient depart- 
ment of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during 
her two months' service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to 
a special instructor. Field trips to various welfare agencies and institutions are 
arranged. Two weeks of instruction and observation of nursing in the home is part 
of every student's experience in connection with her outpatient department service. 
During this period, attention is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social 
aspects of family health service, and the function of the public health nurse is inter- 
preted both in action and in conference. 

College graduates with advanced time credit spend two months at the Institute 
of Living, Hartford, Connecticut, for the study and practice of psychiatric nursing. 

A three months' affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York 
State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

An affiliation of eight weeks in communicable disease nursing is given annually 
at Willard Parker Hospital in New York City to a limited number of students. 

Special clinical experience is offered to a limited number of students at the Mary 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

Harkness Convalescent Home and the New York Orthopedic Hospital and Dis- 
pensary, both of which are units of the Medical Center; and in rural community 
nursing at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Every effort is made to permit each student to have one or two elective services 
during the last six months in the school. These electives are scheduled in units of 
two or three months and may be in new clinical fields, advanced experience in a 
previous service, or in positions of junior administrative responsibility. These elec- 
tive assignments are possible only for those students whose basic clinical require- 
ments have been completed and who have had a good health record. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology, I. Seventy-five hours. Professor Rogers and Miss 
Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Community health. Fifteen hours. Miss Hamon. 

An elementary course in community health responsibilities. In the first half, various aspects of 
sanitation — such as water supply, milk supply, and sewage disposal — are studied in their relation 
to health. The second part of the course surveys the voluntary and official agencies for the control 
and advancement of health. Field trips are included. 

Chemistry. Forty-five hours. Mrs. Prescott and Miss Gill. 

A course in chemistry as related and applied to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, and phar- 
macology. The major portion of the course is devoted to organic and biological chemistry. Labora- 
tory, demonstrations, lectures, and class discussion. 

Elementary pharmacology. Fifteen hours. Miss Gill. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles of drug administra- 
tion, pharmaceutic preparations in common use, types of drug action, legislation concerning drug 
administration, and the fundamental knowledge necessary preceding the study of advanced pharma- 
cology. The use of the metric and apothecary systems of measurements are studied to enable the 
student to compute dosages of drugs and to prepare solutions. A test in arithmetic precedes the 
course. 

Microbiology. Forty-five hours. Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, 
sterilization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and com- 
mon pathogenic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Nursing arts, I. One hundred and thirty-five hours. Professor Pettit, Misses 
Griffin, Lynch, Davidson, and others. 

An introduction to the basic principles of nursing with emphasis on the differences between health 
and sickness; the meaning of an illness to an individual, and the relationship of the nurse to the 
patient and other members of the "health team." The importance of a proper environment and 
the problems in maintaining it are studied. Nursing techniques related to general hygienic care and 
simple therapeutic procedures are demonstrated and practiced in the classroom and on the clinical 
services. The problems of rehabilitation and the principles underlying various therapies are presented 
by films, lectures, and clinical observation. 

Nutrition and cookery. Forty-five hours. Misses Lewis and Vivian. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and 
traced through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon 
the standards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food 
essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. 
In the preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. 
The lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are 
prepared in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, 
temperature of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. In planning the meals 
the economic factor is stressed and low-cost meals are prepared. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 

Personal hygiene. Fifteen hours. Miss Rathbun. 

A discussion of recreation, relaxation, study and work schedules, mental attitudes, and per- 
sonal hygiene essentials for the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health as a factor in 
balanced, successful living. 

Physical education. Thirty hours. Miss Rathbun. 

An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk 
dancing, team sports, and hiking: to assist the student to select an activity which she will enjoy 
pursuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective 
after the Winter Session. 

Professional adjustments, I. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to profes- 
sional etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and 
co-workers. 

SPRING SESSION 

Medical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Cosgriff and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types 
of diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special 
types of treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. Thirty hours. Dr. Ferrer and Miss Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the 
principal surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes 
or demonstrations. Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented 
by ward clinics held each week on the surgical service. 

Anatomy and physiology, II. Thirty hours. Drs. Rogers, Chace, Craft, 
Ferrer, Gusberg, Knowlton, Lindenberg, and Miss Mantel. 

A course of lectures with demonstrations emphasizing normal physiology and its application to 
the different fields of clinical medicine and surgery. 

Diet therapy. Fifteen hours. Miss Vivian. 

This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Elements of pathology. Fifteen hours. Dr. Craft. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class dis- 
cussions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course 
is closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 

Elements of psychology. Fifteen hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human 
behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic understanding of the motives of conduct 
with particular application to nursing. 

Nursing arts, II. Sixty hours. Professor Petitt, Misses Griffin, Lynch, and 
Davidson. 

A course designed to assist the student in more advanced nursing skills, both technical and 
psychological. Special attention is given to the relationship of diagnosis and diagnostic procedures 
to treatment. Emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse in scientific observation and recording, 
and in assisting the patient to adjust to his limitations. Individual plans are developed for complete 
nursing care of patients with varying types of illness. 



2 6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Pharmacology. Thirty hours. Dr. Heath and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic 
action, emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation 
of their effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstra- 
tions of the action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and surgical specialties. Sixty hours. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. Fifteen hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamil- 
ton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition 
of symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for 
preventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given 
by nurse instructors. 

Urological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Lattimer. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of diseases of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Gynecological nursing. Five hours. Dr. Gusberg. 

A study of both medical and surgical aspects of gynecological diseases, the pathology of the 
pelvis, treatments and operations. Weekly classes coincide with the student's month of clinical 
experience. 

Nursing in diseases of ear, nose, and throat. Five hours. Professor Baker. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, 
and throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in diseases of the eye. Ten hours. Dr. Chace and Miss Wright. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases 
and their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthal- 
mology. Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. Ten hours. Misses Jansen and Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: 
the equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials 
used in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Orthopedic nursing. Five hours. Drs. Bragg, Strassburger, Watkins. 

Lectures covering the most common orthopedic conditions and their nursing care. 

Surgical emergencies. Five hours. Miss Griffin. 

A review of the basic knowledge essential to the intelligent management of emergency situations 
as they may arise in daily life. Student discussion is promoted to develop preventive aspects of the 
accident problem both in industry and in the home. 



History of nursing. Fifteen hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tradi- 
tions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 




William F. Wolfe 

THE GRADUATING CLASS MARCHING FROM THE COMMENCEMENT 

EXERCISES 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED 
AT ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT. THE MEDICAL CENTER 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 27 

Nursing arts, III. Fifteen hours. Professor Pettit. 

A course planned to assist the student to utilize her knowledge and skills, to initiate expert 
patient care in hospitals and homes, and to select and organize data for teaching. Field trips are 
arranged for observation of institutions and agencies. 

Professional adjustments, II. Fifteen hours. Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

Psychiatric nursing. Thirty hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. 
Field trips are arranged to the Children's Court of Domestic Relations and institutions concerned 
with aspects of mental hygiene, mental illness, and rehabilitation. 

Modern social problems. Fifteen hours. Miss Geyer. 

The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which have an 
important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teach- 
ing include study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading discussed 
in class. 

THIRD YEAR 

Obstetric nursing. Forty-five hours. Professor Allanach, Miss Cameron, 
and members of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Lectures and clinics by obstetricians and classes, and demonstrations by nurse instructors parallel 
to the clinical experience on the obstetrical service (12 weeks) . 

Pediatric nursing. Forty -five hours. Professor Peto, Miss Kent, Miss Reuss, 
and members of the Department of Pediatrics. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal con- 
ditions of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The 
students receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice 
on the wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instruc- 
tors, dietitians, and a nursery-school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical 
Center. 

The course is parallel to the clinical experience on the pediatric service, covering a 12-week 
period. 

Professional adjustments, III. Thirty Hours. Professor Conrad and special 
lecturers. 

The aim of this course is to prepare the student for her specific responsibilities as a graduate 
nurse, in various fields of practice, in membership in professional organizations, and in leadership 
in community activities. Each student writes a paper on problems and opportunities in a special 
field ; experts in various branches of nursing assist the students in the intensive study and seminars 
connected with this project. 



i) 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
BULLEfTN~l)F~INFORMATION 



Fiftieth Series, No. 1 8 



May 27, 1950 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

)EPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 





^s^^s 1 



:OLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

63O WEST 168TH STREET • NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Columbia ?8lntoergitp Pullettn of information 

Fiftieth Series, No. 18 May 27, 1950 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly from 
January for forty consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter February 7, 1949, at the 
Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at 
a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to the Trustees and the Announcements 
of the several Colleges and Schools relating to the work of the next year. These are made 
as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon application 
to the Office of University Admissions. 

C. U. P. 7>350— 1950. 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I95O-I95I 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

630 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




1 


P 


F 


F 


F 


C 


1 


| 


£ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


¥ 


p 



Wurts Brothers 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



CONTENTS 

Faculty of Medicine 5 

Officers of Instruction 6 

Presbyterian Hospital n 

Officers 11 

Administrative Staff, Nursing Service 12 

History of the School of Nursing 13 

Choice of a Profession 13 

Careers in Nursing 14 

Nursing Course 16 

Application 16 

Basic Course 16 

Admission 17 

Registration 17 

Expenses 17 

Scholarships, Stipends, and Loans 18 

Graduate Study 19 

General Regulations 19 

General Information 20 

Plan of Instruction 22 

Clinical Experience 23 

Courses of Instruction 24 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Dwight David Eisenhower, LL.D President of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D Vice President in Charge of 

Medical Affairs; Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, B.S., A.M., Ph.D Associate Dean and Secretary 

Harold W. Brown, M.D., D.P.H Acting Associate Dean {Public Health) 

Maurice }. Hickey, D.M.D., M.D Associate Dean {Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Margaret Elizabeth Conrad, A.B., Sc.D Associate Dean {Nursing) 

John Bacchus Truslow, A.B., M.D Assistant Dean {Graduate Studies) 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson, Jr. 
Dana W. Atchley 
Frank B. Berry 
James Bordley 
Harold W. Brown 
Charles L. Buxton 
George F. Cahill 
A. Benson Cannon 
E. Gurney Clark 
Hans T. Clarke 
Margaret E. Conrad 
Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
D. Anthony D'Esopo 
Samuel R. Detwiler 
John H. Dunnington 
Earl T. Engle 
John W. Fertig 
Thomas T. Fleming 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 
Angus M. Frantz 
Virginia K. Frantz 
Alfred Gilman 
Ross Golden 
Leonard J. Goldwater 
Magnus I. Gregersen 
Alexander B. Gutman 

CUSHMAN D. HAAGENSEN 

Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Houghton Holliday 
George H. Humphreys, II 
Yale Kneeland, Jr. 



Nolan D. C. Lewis 
Robert F. Loeb 
Ewing C. McBeath 
Donovan J. McCune 
Rustin McIntosh 
Monroe McIver 
Irville H. MacKinnon 
H. Houston Merritt 
Edgar G. Miller, Jr. 
John L. Nickerson 
William Barclay Parsons 
George A. Perera 
J. Lawrence Pool 
Willard C. Rappleye 
Dickinson W. Richards, Jr. 
Henry A. Riley 
Walter S. Root 
Harry M. Rose 
Beatrice C. Seegal 
Aura Edward Severinghaus 
Lawrence W. Sloan 
Alan De Forest Smith 
Gilbert P. Smith 
Harry P. Smith 
Philip E. Smith 
Isidore Snapper 
Lewis R. Stowe 
Howard C. Taylor, Jr. 
John B. Truslow 
Kenneth B. Turner 
Harry B. van Dyke 
Theodore J. C. von Storch 
Jerome P. Webster 
Abner Wolf 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 
OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N. . . . Associate Dean (Nursing); Professor of Nursing; 

Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 
A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Sc.D., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 



Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

1 Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; A.M., New York University, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1932. 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen F. Petttt, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Dorothy Rogers, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1921; A.M., 1934; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1925. 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1927. 



Lillian C. Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hunter, 1942; B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1945- 

H. Virginia Bunn, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1943. 

Beth L. Cameron, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941. 

Carol Cheston, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946. 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Edna L. Danielsen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Grace E. Davidson, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Minnesota, 1948 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

1 On leave 1950-195T. 



DEPARTMENT OF NU RSING 7 

Mar j or ie J. Davis, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1947; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1947. 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; M.A., 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942. 

Margaret F. Frank Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1948. 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Virginia A. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945. 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929. 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Marguerite P. Jansen, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1947; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1936. 

Ruth A. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932 ; A.M., New York University, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 
1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946. 

Margaret E. MacIntire, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933. 

Mary Wentworth McConaughy Lecturer in Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1905; A.M., California, 1910; Ed.D., Harvard, 1924. 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933. 

Edith E. Morgan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 1929. 

Ulah Lewis Peppones Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Ohio, 1933. 

Sarah M. Reuss, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Notre Dame of Maryland, 1944; Graduate, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 
1948. 

Irene H. Russell, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1947 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1947. 

Catherine J. Schell Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1948. 

a DELPHiNE F. Wilde, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

1 On leave 1950-195 1. 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Marguerite Lynn Williams, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939. 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Jane G. Wyatt, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 



Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Charlotte H. Gleeson, R.N Infirmary Nurse 

Bushwick Hospital, School of Nursing, 1919. 

Eula W. Rathbun Recreational Director 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925 ; A.M., Columbia, 1946. 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 
William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

ANESTHESIA 
Anne Penland, R.N Anesthetist, Presbyterian Hospital 

CHEMISTRY 
Blanche A. Prescott, A.B., M.S Assistant in Biochemistry 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 
Charles W. Frank, a.b., m.d Fellow in Medicine 

MEDICAL NURSING 
Stuart W. Cosgriff, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

MICROBIOLOGY 
Margaret Holden, B.S., A.M., Ph.D Associate in Bacteriology 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 9 

NURSING IN MEDICAL AND SURGICAL SPECIALTIES 

Communicable Disease 

Lecturers from the Attending Staff of Willard Parker Hospital arranged by: 

B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Saul B. Gusberg, M.D., Med.ScD Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ophthalmology 
Robert R. Chace, Ph.B., M.D., Med.ScD Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Orthopedics 

Everett C. Bragg, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Robert E. Carroll, A.B., M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Paul J. Strassburger, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Walter A. L. Thompson, M.D. . . Assistant Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery 
Melvin B. Watkins, A.B., M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Otolaryngology 

Daniel C. Baker, Jr., A.B.,M.D.,Med.Sc.D Assistant Clinical Professor 

of Otolaryngology 

Urology 
John K. Lattimer, A.B., M.D., Med.ScD Associate in Urology 

PATHOLOGY 

Donald W. King, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

PHARMACOLOGY 
Calvin H. Plimpton, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy 

Department, Vanderbilt Clinic 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 
Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

NEUROLOGICAL NURSING 

Fritz Cramer, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

Daniel Sciarra, M.D Associate in Neurology 

OBSTETRICAL NURSING 

Ruth C. Harris, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Equinn W. Munnell, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Harold Speert, A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles M. Steer, A.B., M.D., Med.ScD. . Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Susan W. Williamson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

Douglas S. Damrosch, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

David M. Greeley, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

William F. Ketchum, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

SURGICAL NURSING 
Jose M. Ferrer, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

SOCIAL SERVICE CONFERENCES 
Mercedes Geyer, A.B., A.M Lecturer in Public Health Practice 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice President 

Carll Tucker, Vice President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice President 

John Sloane, Vice President 

Henry C. Alexander, Vice President 

Frederick A. O. Schwartz, Vice President 

Cornelius R. Agnew, Treasurer 

Edward C. Bench, Treasurer 

Joseph A. Thomas, Assistant Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Secretary 

Thatcher M. Brown, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



Trustees 



Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Winthrop W. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Edward C. Bench 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
William Sheffield Cowles 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston de Forest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
John M. Franklin 
Artemis L. Gates 
William S. Gray 
Peter Grimm 
William E. S. Griswold, Sr. 



W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 
William Hale Harkness 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
Robert A. Lovett 
James C. Mackenzie 
Samuel W. Meek 
Dunlevy Milbank 
Charles S. Munson 
Edgar A. Newberry 
Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
John Sloane 
John P. Stevens, Jr. 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Joseph A. Thomas 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
Sidney J. Weinberg 
Mrs. Sheldon Whitehouse 



Honorary Trustees 



Charles E. Adams 
Thatcher M. Brown, Sr. 
William A. Delano 
George Lauder Greenway 
Charles Barney Harding 
John A. Hartford 
Rev. John O. Mellin 



Charles S. Payson 
H. Rivington Pyne 
Bayard W. Read 
Edgar F. Romig, D.D. 
Dean Sage 
Rev. L. Humphrey Walz 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing Committee 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Chairman Mrs. Grover O'Neill 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice Chairman John S. Parke, ex-officio 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice Chairman Mrs. Stephen Philbin 

Miss Marie C. Byron J. Lawrence Pool, M.D. 

Mrs. Benjamin Coates Willard C. Rappleye, M.D. 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 

George H. Humphreys II, M.D. Mrs. Byron Stookey 

Robert F. Loeb, M.D. Howard C. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. Mrs. Anton E. Waleridge 

H. Houston Merritt, M.D. Mrs. Staunton Williams 
Mrs. Stanley G. Mortimer 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Margaret E. Conrad, R.N Director of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1917 ; Sc.D., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1920. 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937. 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921. 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920. 

Helen C. Goodale, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1935; A.M., New York University, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1932. 

A. Beatrice Langmuir, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1923. 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936. 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926. 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927. 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931. 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927 ; A.M., Columbia, i94r ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1929. 

Jane G. Wyatt, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944. 

Phyllis M. Young, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927- 



HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a well-known general hospi- 
tal, offering valuable opportunities for the clinical education of nurses. The Hospital 
was founded in 1868 by a group of New York men whose objecdve was the establish- 
ment of an institution "for the purpose of affording medical and surgical aid and 
nursing care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality, and color." 

In 1892 the Board of Managers founded the School of Nursing of die Presbyterian 
Hospital. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., A.M., was the first Director of the School, 
establishing the plans for administration and instruction and guiding it for 30 years. 
The Board of Managers later added the responsibility of affording clinical education 
for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia Uni- 
versity, and in 1921 a permanent affiliation between Columbia University and Presby- 
terian Hospital was established. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center moved to its present location, on 
168th Street west of Broadway, in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Hark- 
ness and her son, Edward S. Harkness. Both were generous contributors to the project. 

Special hospitals which joined in establishing the Medical Center were Sloane Hos- 
pital for Women, Babies Hospital, Neurological Institute, Vanderbilt Clinic, and the 
New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. The Institute of Ophthalmology 
was opened in 1933. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, under 
the direction of a professor of nursing who is an associate dean and a member of the 
Faculty of Medicine. This affiliation marked another step in the closer integration of 
the University and the hospitals at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 

The year 1942 marked the 50th anniversary of the founding of the School of Nurs- 
ing. Over 2,500 nurses have been graduated since the opening of the School. 

The program of instruction formulated by the Faculty of Medicine and the School 
of Nursing aims to provide instruction and practice in the skills necessary to give 
competent care to the sick, awareness and use of the opportunities for health teaching, 
and knowledge and application of the principles of disease prevention. It directs the 
growth of carefully selected young women so that each may achieve a full realization of 
her potentialities as an individual and as an actively participating member of the 
nursing profession and of the community. Incorporated throughout the program the 
best nursing traditions are combined with the essentials demanded by the present wide 
responsibilities of the nurse to society. Instruction in the fundamental medical sciences 
can best be given by the Faculty of Medicine. Well-equipped laboratories and practice 
rooms are at hand. The wards of the hospitals, both general and special, furnish a 
wealth of clinical material. The problems of the community in health or sickness are 
met during experience in the outpatient department and in visiting nursing. A real 
opportunity, therefore, is open for the student nurse to acquire the knowledge and skill 
needed for a firm foundation in the nursing profession. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The young woman today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open to her 
as she considers her future. 



14 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

The spotlight of public opinion is strongly focused on nursing as the need for the 
services of skilled, intelligent professional nurses continues. Estimates of the probable 
number required for the maintenance of health services throughout the nation, in 
civilian and veterans hospitals and in urban and rural communities, call for many 
more professional nurses than are available at present. 

The pursuit of nursing as a career is by no means the only significant way to use it. 
A professional education in nursing affords one of the best preparations for the varied 
responsibilities of marriage. Graduate nurses have proven themselves to be valuable 
members of governing boards of many organizations in communities all over the 
world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly. 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical defect 
is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to mention may 
be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements are outlined on page 15. The School will welcome an oppor- 
tunity to guide its candidates well in advance of the date of entrance. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a hospital before 
entering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities for trying out practical 
"worksamples" of nursing and securing some contact with patients, even at an ele- 
mentary level. Such a procedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving one's 
fitness for nursing and die seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and 
welfare. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

The program in nursing at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center offers ex- 
cellent preparation for the countless opportunities which are open to registered pro- 
fessional nurses in different fields. The three traditional classifications are private duty, 
institutional nursing, and public health nursing. 

Although active recruiting for the Army and Navy Nurse Corps has ceased, there 
are opportunities for important service and influence in a number of government 
services — the Veterans Administration, the Public Health Service, the Indian Serv- 
ice, etc. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in general 
duty, advancing into head-nursing, supervisory, or teaching positions as their experi- 
ence and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who wish to 
specialize in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, psychia- 
try, or orthopedics. 

While the demand for the private-duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hospital 
or home) is not as great as formerly, her position has never been more important. A 
keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possibilities of her vocation in 
private duty may make a real contribution not only in nursing care but also in health 
teaching. The private-duty nurse has a wide influence upon the prestige of the pro- 
fession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school and 
industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare them- 
selves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or in public 
health nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

Whether practicing her profession in government hospitals, in civilian hospital 
wards, in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the industrial plant or 
the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility and honor. 
She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, 
the industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with governmental and volun- 
tary relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the community. American 
nurses have a large share of responsibility in restoring health and welfare services in 
many parts of the world. The opportunities for service increase rather than diminish 
both at home and abroad. 



THE NURSING COURSE 
ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSES 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of 18 and 35 and must present a 
record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal application in writ- 
ing on blanks supplied by the school. After the application has been submitted, the 
academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Department of Nursing 
from the college or high school attended. It is desirable to make application at least 
one year in advance of the date of desired entrance. Students entering from high school 
should present a general average of at least 10 points above the passing mark of their 
school, together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such specific 
requirement is made for college students, preference is always given to those who have 
shown evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official transcript 
of the academic record may be required by the New York State Education Department, 
since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved by the Department. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physical 
examination by the school physician will be made, probably within six months of the 
desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary inter- 
view and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the 
time of admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, 
therefore, come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

APPLICATION BLANKS 

Application blanks and any further information about the course in nursing may be 
secured from the Associate Dean (Nursing), Faculty of Medicine, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of Co- 
lumbia University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered as 
University students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences; theory and 
practice of nursing techniques; clinical experience in medical, surgical, obstetric, and 
pediatric nursing; nutrition; and various specialties and electives in the Presbyterian 
Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic course 
is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college educa- 
tion are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the classroom and 
on the wards. 

After the preliminary period, students who are to receive the degree of Bachelor of 
Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic courses under one of the following classifi- 
cations: 

Group A — Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia Uni- 
versity and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced 
time credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for 
the diploma. Courses in natural science including chemistry, psychology, and sociology 
should be included in the college courses. 

Group B — Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study 
in a college approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education De- 
partment may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. 
Such students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well 
as for the diploma. The 60 points in liberal arts required for admission on this basis 
should include chemistry, biology, psychology, and sociology. This program is fre- 
quently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or university elsewhere 
and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C — Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable 
to Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who 
show evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in 16 units of subject matter, in- 
cluding those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements out- 
lined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the diploma 
in nursing upon completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the require- 
ments as prescribed by the New York State Education Department and the require- 
ments for entrance to the School of Nursing as follows: 

English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry and either biology or general 
science) ; mathematics, 1 unit (algebra or geometry) ; history or social studies, 
2 units; electives, 7 units in 2- or 3-unit sequences in languages or the above 
required subjects. A total of 16 units is required, and the University allows no 
credit for commercial or home economics courses. 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study be approved bv the 
University before final selections are made. Applicants should therefore communicate 
with the Associate Dean, Department of Nursing, two years in advance of the date of 
entrance if possible. 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank giving such 
information as may be required. Registration takes place in Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort 
Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on the first Friday in September. 

EXPENSES 

The application fee of $10 is payable with the application. It covers the cost of as- 
sembling credentials and of the physical examination and aptitude tests, the results of 
which determine the candidate's eligibility. This fee is not returnable regardless of the 
action taken on the application for admission. 



i8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

The University fee of $20 for the academic year or fraction thereof is payable each 
year on the day of registration in September. The application fee is credited on the 
University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay a 
tuition fee of $500 in two installments: $250 at the beginning of the first year and $250 
at the beginning of die second year. Students taking the course as candidates for the 
diploma pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at die beginning of the 
first year and $200 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the probable 
cost of the course in nursing (see page 15 for classification). The cost of the college 
study preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend entirely upon 
the institution selected. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $ 10 $ 10 $ 10 

First tuition 250 250 200 

Second tuition 250 250 200 

University fees 40 50 50 

Degree application 20 20 

$570 $580 S460 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable amount 
of laundry without charge. During the preliminary period the student provides her 
own uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $75 to the above 
totals. After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All necessary textbooks 
and instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

A fee of $3.00 will be charged for each deficiency examination, payable before the 
examination. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Twenty dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student 
nurses in the school. 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives 
a limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is excellent, 
and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships 
are not open to students until they have been in the School for six months. 

University stipends or grants-in-aid are available to students in need of financial 
assistance. These funds applv against tuition and are granted in amounts of $50 to 
$125. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship covers the cost of tuition and University fees for a de- 
gree candidate during her three years in the School. This scholarship has been given 
in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President of the Presbyterian Hospital Board of 
Trustees, by his family. 

Special scholarships are granted from time to time by individuals or groups. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow reasonable 
amounts without interest at any time after the first term. 



DEPARTMENT OF NU RS1NG 19 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in writing to the 
Associate Dean, Department of Nursing. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, offers 
to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work in the 
nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward a Master 
of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may be accepted for the work for 
the Bachelor of Science degree provided they meet the special requirements of the 
Division. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master of Science 
degree, are offered by the Department of Nursing to graduate nurses who hold accept- 
able bachelor's degrees and who have had satisfactory experience. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a de- 
gree, certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student 
of the University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as on 
the fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student of 
the University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection with 
the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student registered 
in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be registered in any 
other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other institution, with- 
out the consent of die appropriate dean or director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Department 
of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the condi- 
tions of study in the Department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
her of academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems advisable. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the President 
in such cases as he deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the President, 
in the dean of each faculty and the director of the work of each administrative board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic 
standing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity; but no student under the age of 21 years shall be entitled to a discharge without 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

the assent of her parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Dean. Students with- 
drawing are required to notify die Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reason of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in good 
standing. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, according 
to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. A deficiency examination will be 
required of every student failing to receive a passing grade (75 percent) in any course. 
Failure to obtain a passing grade will be sufficient reason for asking a student to re- 
peat the course or to resign from the School. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor of 
Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the pre- 
scribed course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the Faculty 
of Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University 
degree, will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. The graduation exercises at which the 
Hospital diplomas and pins are awarded are held in the Presbyterian Hospital gardens. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of 
the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York, and, to- 
gether with her state license to practice nursing (R.N.), it entitles her to membership 
in the American Nurses Association. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED NURSE (r.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held four times a year (January, April, July, and October) 
under the direction of the Department of Education of New York State. After passing 
these examinations the graduate nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse (R.N.) . 
Graduates of the nursing course at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center are 
eligible for examination for registration. 

According to the law in New York State, only those persons who have filed intentions 
of becoming United States citizens may be admitted to the examinations for license 
to practice as registered nurses. Candidates who are not citizens should discuss this 
question carefully before filing application papers for entrance to the School. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the residence hall of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking the 
Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other buildings 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and die 
study hall are located in this building. Two new wings were added in 1945, increasing 
both the housing capacity and the library facilities. There are 10 bedroom floors ac- 
commodating 450 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every 
effort has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living 
conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence 
hall during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours of 
sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the 
school physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. 
All students have X-ray examinations of the chest and tuberculin tests at yearly intervals. 
Vaccinations with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) will be advised for those students 
whose tuberculin test is negative. The written consent of parents will be required before 
vaccination with BCG, as the procedure is optional. 

Students are under the care of the school physician or surgeon during their regis- 
tration in the School. Within reasonable limits, the hospital assumes the cost of medical 
care. Each student will be expected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care 
and eye refraction. 

VACATION 

A vacation of 10 weeks is allowed each student: one week at Christmas during the 
preliminary term; four weeks each year during the first and second years; and one 
week in the third year. To the student entering with eight months' credit for her 
college degree, six weeks' vacation is allowed: one week at Christmas; four weeks at 
the end of the first year; and one week in the last year. The dates at which vacations 
are given are subject to the necessities of the School and Hospital. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may 
attend the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers are 
held each day and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association 
with faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A periodical 
known as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other activities include 
a dramatic club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, and Bible study 
group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the swim- 
ming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recreational 
Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and tennis. 
The program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the student and 
to provide a wise use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a classroom pro- 
gram, but each student is required to participate in one or more of these activities. 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the city 
of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. A station 
wagon is owned by the school. It is used to take groups of students on picnics to near-by 
recreational areas and beaches and also for professional visits to other institutions and 
agencies. Its purchase was made possible by the annual bazaar of the Senior Class, 1950. 

TEACHING FACILITIES 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. In- 
struction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching pur- 
poses. The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available for 
instruction in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, materia medica, and pathology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. 
Maxwell Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference Library 
Fund to keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of approved refer- 
ence books. The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia University is available 
to those desiring advanced professional study. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

The Medical Center Bookstore, located on the second floor of the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, is maintained for the convenience of the students and staff of the 
Medical Center schools and hospitals. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all 
other student supplies. Substantial savings are effected whenever the rules of manu- 
facturers and publishers permit. The store is open on weekdays from 8:45 a.m. to 5:30 
p.m.; Saturdays, 8:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 



PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 15.) 

During the first four months of the course no duty on the hospital wards is required 
of the student except for teaching purposes. All instruction study and practice take 
place in classrooms provided for this purpose. Following this period of intensive study 
the student is gradually introduced to the general care of the sick on the wards. One 
month of this experience gives to the student a basis for deciding whether or not she 
is justified in her selection of nursing as a profession and an opportunity to indicate her 
fitness for it. If she meets the requirements, she receives the School uniform and cap. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in classroom and practical 
work on the wards will be continued coordinately. The student is on duty for a 40-hour 
week, including time spent in the classroom. Class attendance time on off-duty days 
is made up on Sunday. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite periods, 
has been used for the past 10 years. This arrangement has several advantages: the stu- 
dents are not on night duty while going to class; the time spent in class is included in 
the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on the ward and the responsibilities 
given are decreased. In planning the students' experience in the various services, espe- 
cially affiliations and vacations, the outline of the block system is used. 



DEPARTMENT OF NU RS1N G 23 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical wards where 
the student obtains her actual experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

The special services include gynecology, urology, and operating room; nose and 
throat, eye, fracture, or metabolism wards. Three months of experience in obstetrics at 
Sloane Hospital and three months in pediatrics at Babies Hospital are provided for each 
student. In the special services the classes are correlated with the practical experience. 

Clinics at which attendance is required are given by doctors on the wards once a 
week, and all student nurses on that particular service attend. Each student writes one 
nursing care study every month. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the outpatient department of 
the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during her two 
months' service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to a special in- 
structor. Field trips to various welfare agencies and institutions are arranged. Two 
weeks of instruction and observation of nursing in the home is part of every student's 
experience in connection with her outpatient department service. During this period 
attention is focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health 
service and the function of the public health nurse is interpreted both in action and in 
conference. 

College graduates with advanced time credit spend two months at the Institute of 
Living, Hartford, Connecticut, for the study and practice of psychiatric nursing. 

A three months' affiliation in psychiatric nursing is available at the New York State 
Psychiatric Institute and Hospital. 

Two months of clinical experience in the Neurological Institute are given to all 
students except those who affiliate at the Psychiatric Institute and those completing 
the course in less than three years. 

An affiliation of eight weeks in communicable disease nursing is given annually at 
Willard Parker Hospital in New York city to a limited number of students. 

Special clinical experience is offered to a limited number of students at the Mary 
Harkness Convalescent Home and the New York Orthopedic Hospital and Dispensary, 
both of which are units of the Medical Center; and in rural community nursing at the 
Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Every effort is made to permit each student to have one or two elective services dur- 
ing the last six months in the school. These electives are scheduled in units of two or 
three months and may be in new clinical fields, advanced experience in a previous 
service, or in positions of junior administrative responsibility. These elective assign- 
ments are possible only for those students whose basic clinical requirements have been 
completed and who have had a good health record. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Anatomy and physiology, I. 75 hours. Professor Rogers and Miss Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems 
of the human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. 
Lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and discussion. 

Community health. 15 hours. Miss Hamon. 

An elementary course in community health responsibilities. In the first half, various aspects of 
sanitation — such as water supply, milk supply, and sewage disposal — are studied in their relation 
to health. The second part of the course surveys the voluntary and official agencies for the control 
and advancement of health. Field trips are included. 

Chemistry. 45 hours. Mrs. Prescott and Miss Gill. 

A course in chemistry as related and applied to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, and phar- 
macology. The major portion of the course is devoted to organic and biological chemistry. Labora- 
tory, demonstrations, lectures, and class discussion. 

Elementary pharmacology. 15 hours. Miss Gill. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles of drug administra- 
tion, pharmaceutic preparations in common use, types of drug action, legislation concerning drug 
administration, and the fundamental knowledge necessary preceding the study of advanced pharma- 
cology. The use of the metric and apothecary systems of measurements are studied to enable the 
student to compute dosages of drugs and to prepare solutions. A test in arithmetic precedes the 
course. 

Microbiology. 45 hours. Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, 
sterilization, and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common 
pathogenic bacteria. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 

Nursing arts, I. 135 hours. Professor Pettit, Misses Cheston, Lynch, Davidson, 
and others. 

An introduction to the basic principles of nursing with emphasis on the differences between health 
and sickness ; the meaning of an illness to an individual, and the relationship of the nurse to the 
patient and other members of the "health team." The importance of a proper environment and 
the problems in maintaining it are studied. Nursing techniques related to general hygienic care and 
simple therapeutic procedures are demonstrated and practiced in the classroom and on the clinical 
services. The problems of rehabilitation and the principles underlying various therapies are presented 
by films, lectures, and clinical observation. 

Nutrition and cookery. 45 hours. Mrs. Peppones and Miss Frank. 

Nutrition : A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods 
are classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced 
through the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the standards 
for a normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the 
preparation of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The 
lessons are planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared 
in one lesson and are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature 
of the food, general arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. In planning the meals the economic 
factor is stressed and low-cost meals are prepared. 

Personal hygiene. 15 hours. Miss Rathbun. 

A discussion of recreation, relaxation, study and work schedules, mental attitudes, and personal 
hygiene essentials for the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health as a factor in balanced, 
successful living. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 



Physical education. 30 hours. Miss Rathbun. 



An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk dancing, 
team sports, and hiking in order to assist the student to select an activity which she will enjoy 
pursuing. Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective after 
the Winter Session. 

Professional adjustments, I. 15 hours. Professor Conrad. 

A series of class conferences designed to aid the student in her adjustment to the responsibilities 
of professional life and to give her an understanding of those functions of institutional management 
which contribute indirectly to the welfare of the patient. Special consideration is given to professional 
etiquette and discipline as a basis for the proper attitude toward patients, physicians, and co-workers. 

SPRING SESSION 

Medical nursing. 30 hours. Dr. Cosgriff and Miss Gill. 

Lectures directed toward giving an understanding of the fundamentals of representative types of 
diseases and class discussions of nursing care of these diseases with demonstrations of special types of 
treatment. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each week on the medical wards. 

Surgical nursing. 30 hours. Dr. Ferrer and Miss Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatments of the principal 
surgical conditions. Lectures and clinics by surgeons are followed by nursing classes or demonstrations. 
Special emphasis is given to surgical technique. The work is supplemented by ward clinics held each 
week on the surgical service. 

Anatomy and physiology, II. 30 hours. Drs. Rogers, Chace, Ferrer, Frank, 
Gusberg, Knowlton, and Lindenberg and Miss Mantel. 

A course of lectures with demonstrations emphasizing normal physiology and its application to 
the different fields of clinical medicine and surgery. 



Diet therapy. 15 hours. Mrs. Peppones. 



This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the student 
studies the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis 
for planning therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the 
patient's individual needs, social, racial, and economic. 

Elements of pathology. 15 hours. Dr. Frank. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical 
diagnosis and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class dis- 
cussions, and laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. The course 
is closely related to the classes in medical and surgical nursing. 

Elements of psychology. 15 hours. Dr. McConaughy. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human 
behavior, directed toward giving the student a sympathetic understanding of the motives of conduct 
with particular application to nursing. 

Nursing arts, II. 60 hours. Professor Pettit and Misses Cheston, Lynch, and 
Davidson. 

A course designed to assist the student in more advanced nursing skills, both technical and 
psychological. Special attention is given to the relationship of diagnosis and diagnostic procedures 
to treatment. Emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse in scientific observation and recording 
and in assisting the patient to adjust to his limitations. Individual plans are developed for complete 
nursing care of patients with varying types of illness. 

Pharmacology. 30 hours. Dr. Heath and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of the study of drugs from the standpoint of their therapeutic action, 
emphasizing the accurate and intelligent administration of medicines and the observation of their 
effect. Classes are conducted by a physician and a nurse instructor and include demonstrations of the 
action of drugs and clinics on the medical and surgical wards. 



26 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

SECOND YEAR 
Medical and surgical specialties. 60 hours. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. 15 hours. Arranged by Dr. Hamilton. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition 
of symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for 
preventive work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given 
by nurse instructors. 

Urological nursing. 5 hours. Dr. Lattimer. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of diseases of the genitourinary tract. Each student 
has one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Gynecological nursing. 5 hours. Dr. Gusberg. 

A study of the female reproductive organs, their functions and the pathological conditions requiring 
gynecological treatment. During the student's month of clinical experience, additional classes and 
conferences are given by the resident physician and nurse instructor emphasizing the emotional aspects 
of gynecological nursing and family sociologic needs for satisfactory rehabilitation. 

Nursing in diseases of the nervous system. 5 hours. Dr. Sciarra and Mrs. 
Delabarre. 

A brief survey of medical and surgical aspects of neurologic diseases. Selected nursing procedures 
and planning for continuity of care are correlated with spinal cord injuries and epilepsy. 

Nursing in otolaryngology. 5 hours. Professor Baker. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, 
and throat and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in ophthalmology. 10 hours. Dr. Chace and Miss Wright. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye, a few of the common diseases 
and their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthal- 
mology. Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. 5 hours. Misses Jansen and Penland. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are: 
the equipment of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials 
used in preparing for operations, transfusions, etc. The student continues her study during her two 
months' experience in the operating room. These classes include four lectures on anesthesia. 

Orthopedic nursing. 5 hours. Professor Thompson and Drs. Bragg, Carroll, 
Strassburger, and Watkins. 

Lectures covering the most common orthopedic conditions and their nursing care. 

Surgical emergencies. 5 hours. Miss Davidson. 

A review of the basic knowledge essential to the intelligent management of emergency situations 
as they may arise in daily life. Student discussion is promoted to develop preventive aspects of the 
accident problem both in industry and in the home. 



History of nursing. 15 hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing tradi- 
tions and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and 
influences which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by 
lantern slides. Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Nursing arts, III. 15 hours. Professor Pettit. 

A course planned to assist the student to utilize her knowledge and skills, to initiate expert patient 
care in hospitals and homes, and to select and organize data for teaching. Field trips are arranged 
for observation of institutions and agencies. 




Acme News Pictures 
DEAN MARGARET E. CONRAD LEAVING THE GRADUATION EXERCISES 
UNDER THE ARCH OF DIPLOMAS 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED 
AT ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



DEPART MEN T OF NURSING 



27 



Professional adjustments, II. 15 hours. Professor Conrad. 

This course is a continuation of the study of professional obligations and responsibilities. Class 
discussions give an opportunity for interpretation of concrete problems as they arise in the student's 
experience. 

Psychiatric nursing. 30 hours. Professor MacKinnon. 

The lectures of this course deal with mental hygiene and the relationship between mental and 
physical illness. The aim of the course is to develop a proper understanding of mentally ill patients. 
The underlying causes of some common mental diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the 
part of the nurse in preventive work. These classes are held at the New York State Psychiatric Institute 
where clinics and demonstrations of hydrotherapy and occupational therapy are conducted. Field trips 
are arranged to the Children's Court of Domestic Relations and institutions concerned with aspects 
of mental hygiene, mental illness, and rehabilitation. 

Modern social problems. 15 hours. Miss Geyer. 

The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which have an 
important bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teaching include 
study, presentation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading. 

THIRD YEAR 

Obstetric nursing. 45 hours. Professor Allanach, Miss Cameron, and members 
of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

This course aims to emphasize the fact that obstetrics is a physiologic process rather than a pathologic 
one ; to assist the student in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and practice 
safe care of the mother and her baby during the maternity period ; and to develop an awareness of 
responsibility to teach health principles to the mother as an integral part of obstetric nursing. 

Lectures and clinics are given by obstetricians ; classes and demonstrations by the nurse instructor 
and dietitians. 

Pediatric nursing. 45 hours. Professor Peto, Miss Kent, Miss Reuss, and mem- 
bers of the Department of Pediatrics. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal conditions 
of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The students 
receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice on the 
wards and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instructors, 
dietitians, and a nursery-school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical Center. 

The course is parallel to the clinical experience on the pediatric service, covering a 12-week 
period. 

Professional adjustments, HI. 30 hours. Professor Conrad and special lecturers. 

The aim of this course is to prepare the student for her specific responsibilities as a graduate 
nurse, in various fields of practice, in membership in professional organizations, and in leadership 
in community activities. Each student writes a paper on problems and opportunities in a special field ; 
experts in various branches of nursing assist the students in the intensive study and seminars connected 
with this project. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
LLETIN OF INFORMATION 



Fifty -first Series, No. 33 



September 1, 1 9 5 1 



STACKS 




^ . ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

)EPARTMENT OF NURSING 




OF THE 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 




PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 



j>- 



SCH 



OOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 





IOLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

63O WEST l68TH STREET • NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Columbia ®totoergitj> ^Bulletin of 3nformatton 

Fifty-first Series, No. 33 September 1, 1951 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N. Y., weekly from 
January for forty consecutive issues. Re-entered as second-class matter January 20, 1951, 
at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance for 
mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to the Trustees and the Announcements 
of the several Colleges and Schools relating to the work of the next year. These are made 
as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon application 
to the Office of University Admissions. 

C. U. P. 7,500 — 1951 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 
I95I-I952 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

63O WEST l68TH STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 

Faculty of Medicine 3 

Officers of Instruction 4 

Presbyterian Hospital 

Officers 8 

Administrative Staff, Nursing Service 9 

History of the School of Nursing 11 

Choice of a Profession 12 

Careers in Nursing .... 12 

Nursing Course 

Application 14 

Basic Course 14 

Admission . 15 

Registration 16 

Expenses 16 

Scholarships, Stipends, and Loans 16 

Graduate Study 17 

General Regulations 

Students 17 

Academic Discipline 17 

Withdrawal 18 

Academic Requirements 18 

Graduation 18 

Qualification for Registered Nurse 18 

General Information 19 

Plan of Instruction 20 

Clinical Experience 21 

Courses of Instruction 

First Year 22 

Second Year 24 

Second or Third Year 25 







Harold HaliJay Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




Wurts Brothers 
ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

Officers of the Faculty 

Dwight D. Eisenhower, LL.D President of the University 

Grayson L. Kirk, Ph.D., LL.D Vice President and Provost of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., ScD., Med.Sc.D. . Vice President in Charge of 

Medical Affairs; Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, Ph.D Associate Dean and Secretary 

Harold W. Brown, M.D., D.P.H Associate Dean (Public Health) 

Maurice J. Hickey, D.M.D., M.D Associate Dean (Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Eleanor Lee, A.B., R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 



The Faculty 



J. Burns Amberson 
Dana W. Atchley 
Frank B. Berry 
James Bordley III 
Harold W. Brown 
Charles L. Buxton 
George F. Cahill 
E. Gurney Clark 
Hans T. Clarke 
Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
Richard L. Day 
D. Anthony D'Esopo 
Samuel R. Detwiler 
John H. Dunnington 
Earl T. Engle 
John W. Fertig 
Thomas T. Fleming 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 
Virginia K. Frantz 
Alfred Gilman 
Ross Golden 
Leonard J. Goldwater 
Magnus I. Gregersen 
Alexander B. Gutman 

CUSHMAN D. HAAGENSEN 

Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Houghton Holliday 
George H. Humphreys II 
Yale Kneeland, Jr. 
Nolan D. C. Lewis 



Robert F. Loeb 
Ewing C. McBeath 
Rustin McIntosh 
Monroe McIver 
Irville H. MacKinnon 
Rollo J. Masselink 
H. Houston Merritt 
Edgar G. Miller, Jr. 
John L. Nickerson 
William Barclay Parsons 
George A. Perera 
J. Lawrence Pool 
Willard C. Rappleye 
Dickinson W. Richards, Jr. 
Henry A. Riley 
Walter S. Root 
Harry M. Rose 
Beatrice C. Seegal 
David Seegal 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 
Lawrence W. Sloan 
Alan DeForest Smith 
Gilbert P. Smith 
Harry P. Smith 
Philip E. Smith 
Isidore Snapper 
Lewis R. Stowe 
Howard C. Taylor 
Kenneth B. Turner 
Harry B. van Dyke 
Theodore J. C. von Storch 
Jerome P. Webster 
Abner Wolf 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 
A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; M.S., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

G. Harriet Mantel, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927 



Josephine Camilla Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Duke, 1942; B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Lillian C. Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hunter, 1942 ; B.S., Columbia, 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Annie E. Bullick, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1949 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1949 

Beth L. Cameron, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; A.M., 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Ruth Ina Fisher, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Allegheny, 1945; A.M., Columbia, 195 1; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Pittsburgh, 1945 

Margaret F. Frank Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1948 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Virginia A. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Margaret A. Hogan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Cooley Dickinson School of Nursing, 1930; A.M., Columbia, 1946 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1936 

Ruth A. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932 ; A.M., New York University, 1943 ; B.S., Columbia, 
1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Margaret E. MacIntire, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 

Lucille D. Manning, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York State College for Teachers, 1935; B.S., Columbia, 1949; Graduate, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1949 

Josephine E. Mellor, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1951 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939 

Susan B. Moore, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., American University, 1939; B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1943 

Edith E. Morgan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia 1943; A.M., 1951; Graduate, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 1929 

Phyllis L. Partridge, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Madison, 1943; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1949 

Dorothy Elizabeth Reilly, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; M.S., Boston, 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Alice Lorraine Rodenhiser, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, 1948 

Irene H. Russell, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Vanderbilt, 1944; B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1947 

Ellen Garinger Smith, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Marguerite Lynn Williams, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

Jane G. Wyatt, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Charlotte H. Gleeson, R.N Infirmary Nurse 

Bushwick Hospital, School of Nursing, 1919 

Eula W. Rathbun Recreational Director 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925 ; A.M., Columbia, 1946 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

Anatomy and Physiology 

William M. Rogers, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Chemistry 

Jeannette A. Behre, Ph.D Associate in Biochemistry 

Clinical Pathology 

Charles W. Frank, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Medical Nursing 
Stuart W. Cosgriff, M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Microbiology 

Margaret Holden, Ph.D Associate in Bacteriology 

Modern Social Problems 

Mercedes G. Geyer, A.M Lecturer in Public Health Practice 

Neurological Nursing 

Fritz Cramer, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

Daniel Sciarra, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Nursing in Medical and Surgical Specialties 

Gynecology 

Saul B. Gusberg, M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Ophthalmology 

Robert R. Chace, M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Orthopedics 

Everett C. Bragg, M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgeiy 

Robert E. Carroll, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Melvin B. Watkins, M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 



DEPARTMENT OF N URSING 7 

Otolaryngology 

Daniel C. Baker, Jr., M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Clinical Professor 

of Otolaryngology 
Urology 

John K. Lattimer, M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Urology 

Obstetrical Nursing 

Ruth C. Harris, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Equinn W. Munnell, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Harold Speert, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles M. Steer, M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Susan W. Williamson, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Pathology 
Donald W. King, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Pediatric Nursing 

Douglas S. Damrosch, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Edward H. Ahrens, Jr., M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Pharmacology 

Calvin H. Plimpton, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Physical Therapy 

Edith Hansen, R.N Chief Technician, Physical Therapy 

Department, Vanderbilt Clinic 

Psychiatric Nursing 

(including Mental Health) 

Paul D. Ecker, M.D Assistant Physician, Vanderbilt Clinic 

Irville H. MacKinnon, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Surgical Nursing 
Jose M. Ferrer, Jr., M.D Instructor in Surgery 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

Henry C. Alexander, Vice President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice President 

Frederick A. O. Schwarz, Vice President 

John Sloane, Vice President 

Carll Tucker, Vice President 

Edward C. Bench, Treasurer 

Joseph A. Thomas, Assistant Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Secretary 

Thatcher M. Brown, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



Trustees 



Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Winthrop W. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Edward C. Bench 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
William Sheffield Cowles 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston de Forest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
John M. Franklin 
Artemis L. Gates 
William S. Gray 
Peter Grimm 

Mrs. Sheldon 



William E. S. Griswold, Si- 
W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 
William Hale Harkness 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
Robert A. Lovett 1 
James C. Mackenzie 
Samuel W. Meek 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Charles S. Munson 
Edgar A. Newberry 
Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
John Sloane 
John P. Stevens, Jr. 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Joseph A. Thomas 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
Sidney J. Weinberg 
Whitehouse 



Honorary Trustees 



Charles E. Adams 
Thatcher M. Brown, Sr. 
William A. Delano 
George Lauder Greenway 
Charles Barney Harding 
John A. Hartford 



Rev. John O. Mellin 
Charles S. Payson 
H. Rivington Pyne 
Bayard W. Read 
Edgar F. Romig, D.D. 
Dean Sage 



Rev. James Grey Spence 



1 Leave of absence. 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 
Nursing 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Chairman 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice Chairman 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice Chairman 



Miss Marie C. Byron 
Mrs. Benjamin Coates 
Miss Margaret Eliot 
George H. Humphreys II, M.D. 
Miss Eleanor Lee 
Robert F. Loeb, M.D. 
Rustin McIntosh, M.D. 
H. Houston Merritt, M.D. 
Mrs. Stanley G. Mortimer 



Mrs. Grover O'Neill 
Mrs. Stephen H. Philbin 
J. Lawrence Pool, M.D. 

WlLLARD C. RAPPLEYE, M.D. 

Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 
Mrs. Byron Stookey 
Howard C. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 
Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 
Mrs. Staunton Williams 



John S. Parke, Ex-Officio 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Acting Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; M.S., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecilf. Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

A. Beatrice Langmuir, R.N Assistant Director of Nursifig 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1925 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1948 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, 195 1; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941 ; A.M., 1945 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927 ; A.M., Columbia, 1941 ; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1929 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Jane G. Wyatt, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944 

Phyllis M. Young, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 



HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is one of the large, modern medical 
centers of the East. The specialized hospitals of the Medical Center have histories and 
enviable professional reputations dating back many years prior to their merger to form 
the Medical Center. The Presbyterian Hospital is traditionally progressive because of the 
constant study for improved methods to care for the health of individuals. This concept 
was first introduced with the founding of Presbyterian Hospital in 1868 and has con- 
tinued through the years, as has its original aim of "affording medical and surgical aid 
and nursing care to sick or disabled persons of every creed, nationality, and color." The 
clinical facilities and opportunities for learning are vast. 

The School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital was founded in 1892 by the Board 
of Managers. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., A.M., the first Director of the School, 
established the plans for administration and instruction and guided them for thirty years. 
Her contribution had a lasting effect upon the growth of the profession to its present 
dignity and importance. Over three thousand nurses have been graduated since the 
opening of the school. 

The Hospital's interest in teaching was further demonstrated by affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia 
University. This led to a permanent affiliation between the two institutions in 1921. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center at 168th Street, overlooking the Hudson 
River, was opened in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness and her 
son, Edward S. Harkness; both were generous contributors to the project. The Medical 
Center has continued to expand according to the needs of the community, medical re- 
search, and education. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, and in 1937 
the University established the Department of Nursing of the Faculty of Medicine. This 
affiliation marked another step in the integration of the University and the hospitals at 
the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. In 1950 the Department of Nursing was 
surveyed and approved by the National Nursing Accrediting Service. 

AIMS 

For both the degree and the non-degree students, the aim of the basic professional 
nursing program is to prepare qualified young women to practice nursing effectively in 
hospitals, homes, and in the various types of health agencies. 

The degree program, in addition to the above, is so planned that students in this group 
have the opportunity to utilize and further develop the greater maturity and educational 
experience which they bring to the situation. The wide and varied experiences of this 
program are directed toward challenging the students' knowledge and skills, tangible 
and intangible. 

In both the degree and the non-degree programs, nursing is interpreted as including 
health promotion through education, care of the sick and injured, and restoration to a 
useful place in society. 

Throughout her nursing education, the student is encouraged and provided the 
opportunity to become aware of the social and health needs of individuals and the com- 
munity, their effect upon the trends in national thinking, as well as the present and 
possible contribution of nursing to human welfare. 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Opportunity is provided for die continued development of the student physically, 
mentally, emodonally, and culturally with emphasis on her interests, needs, and responsi- 
bilities as a person, a member of the nursing profession, and as a cidzen. 

The student is introduced to the various opportunities in nursing and is helped to 
select for further study and experience that field of nursing in which she will find her 
greatest sadsfaction and to which she can make her optimum contribudon. 

THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The young woman today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open to her as she 
considers her future. 

The spotlight of public opinion is strongly focused on nursing as the need for the 
services of skilled, intelligent professional nurses continues. Esdmates of the probable 
number required for the maintenance of health services throughout the nation, in Army, 
Navy, civilian, and veterans hospitals and in urban and rural communities, call for many 
more professional nurses than are available at present. 

The pursuit of nursing as a career is by no means the only significant way to use it. 
A professional education in nursing affords one of the best preparadons for the varied 
responsibilides of marriage. Graduate nurses have proven themselves to be valuable 
members of governing boards of many organizations in communides all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly. 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical defect 
is magnified in nursing. Condidons which may seem too insignificant to mention may 
be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements are outlined on page 15. The School will welcome an oppor- 
tunity to guide its candidates well in advance of the date of entrance. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a hospital before 
entering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities for trying out practical "work- 
samples" of nursing and securing some contact with patients, even at an elementary 
level. Such a procedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for 
nursing and die seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 

CAREERS rN NURSING 

The program in nursing at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center offers excellent 
preparation for the countless opportunities which are open to registered professional nurses 
in different fields. The three traditional classifications are private duty, institutional 
nursing, and public health nursing. 

There are opportunities for important service and influence in a number of government 
services — the Veterans Administration, the Public Health Service, the Indian Service, 
etc. The Army and the Navy Nurse Corps are again actively recruiting nurses. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in general 
duty, advancing into head-nursing, supervisory, or teaching positions as their experience 
and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who wish to specialize 
in certain clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, psychiatry, or 
orthopedics. 

While die demand for the private duty nurse (caring for one patient in the hospital 
or home) is not as great as formerly, her position has never been more important. A 
keen and sympathetic nurse with understanding of the possiblities of her vocation in 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 13 

private duty may make a real contribution not only in nursing care but also in health 
teaching. The private duty nurse has a wide influence upon the prestige of the profession. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school and 
industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare them- 
selves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or in public 
health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in government hospitals, in civilian hospital wards, 
in classrooms, in the private home or in the tenement, in the industrial plant or the rural 
community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility and honor. She is 
constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the industrial 
physician, and the social worker, as well as with governmental and voluntary relief 
agencies and others concerned with the health of the community. American nurses have 
a large share of responsiblity in restoring health and welfare services in many parts of the 
world. The opportunities for service increase rather than diminish, both at home and 
abroad. 






THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSES 

Application 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and must 
present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal application 
in writing on blanks supplied by the school. After the application has been submitted, 
the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Department of Nursing from 
the college or high school attended. It is desirable to make application at least one year 
in advance of the date of desired entrance. Students entering from high school should 
present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their school, 
together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such specific require- 
ment is made for college students, preference is always given to those who have shown 
evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official transcript 
of the academic record may be required by the New York State Education Department, 
since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved by the Department. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physical 
examinadon bv the school physican will be made by the Department of Nursing, probably 
within six months of the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examinadon is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time of 
admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, therefore, 
come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

Application Blanks 

Application blanks and any further information about the course in nursing may be 
secured from the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University, 630 
West 1 68th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 

The Basic Course 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of Columbia 
University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered as University 
students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences; theory and practice of 
nursing techniques; clinical experience in medical, surgical, obstetric, pediatric, and 
psychiatric nursing; nutrition; and various specialties and electives in the Presbyterian 
Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic course 
is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college education 
are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the classroom and on 
the wards. 

After the preclinical period, students who are candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science on completion of the course will attend classes in separate sections. 





THE COLUMBlfl 




WCAL CENTER 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

Admission 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic courses under one of the following classifications: 

Group A — Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for 
the diploma. Courses in natural science including chemistry, psychology, and sociology 
should be included in the college courses. 

Group B — Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a 
college approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Department 
may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. Such students 
are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. 
The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this basis should include: 

Points 

Requirements: Chemistry, 1 physics, or biology 8 

English 6 

Psychology 6 

Sociology 6 26 

Electives: Language, history, mathematics, economics, philosophy, or 
religion, 2 fine arts or supplementary courses in the required 
fields 34 

No credit will be granted for commercial, home economics, physical education, 
or vocational courses. No credit will be granted for any one-point course. 

This program is frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or 
university elsewhere and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C — Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who show 
evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, including 
those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements outlined under A 
and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the diploma in nursing upon 
completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the requirements as prescribed by 
the New York State Education Department and the requirements for entrance to the 
School of Nursing as follows: 

English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry and either biology or general science) ; 
mathematics, 1 unit (algebra or geometry); history or social studies, 2 units; 
electives, 7 units in 2- or 3-unit sequences in languages or the above required sub- 
jects. A total of 16 units is required, and the University allows no credit for com- 
mercial or home economics courses. 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study be approved by the 
University before final selections are made. Applicants should therefore communicate 
with the Department of Nursing two years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

1 Chemistry required if it has not been taken in high school. 

2 A maximum of 6 credits may be allowed for courses in religion or speech. 



i6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Registration 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank giving such 
information as may be required. Registradon takes place in Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort 
Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on the first Thursday in September. 

Expenses 

The application fee of $10 is payable with the applicadon. It covers the cost of assembling 
credentials and of the physical examination and aptitude tests, the results of which 
determine the candidate's eligibility. This fee is not returnable regardless of the action 
taken on the application for admission. 

The University fee of $40 for the academic year or fraction thereof is payable each 
year on the day of registration in September. The application fee is credited on the 
University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay a 
tuition fee of $500 in two installments: $250 at the beginning of die first year and $250 
at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates for the 
diploma pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the beginning of the 
first year and $200 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the probable 
cost of the course in nursing (see page 15 for classification). The cost of die college study 
preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend entirely upon the 
institution attended. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Application $ 20 $ 20 $ 20 

First tuition 250 250 200 

Second tuition 250 250 200 

University fees 80 100 100 

Degree application 20 20 

$620 $640 $520 

All checks for tuition and University fees should be made payable to Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable amount 
of laundry without charge. During the preclinical period the student provides her own 
uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $75 to the above totals. 
After acceptance, uniforms are provided by the Hospital. All necessary textbooks and 
instruments are also supplied by the Hospital. 

A fee of $3.00 will be charged for each deficiency examination, payable before the 
examination. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Twenty dollars per month has been found 
to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations, for student nurses in 
the school. 

Scholarships, Stipends, and Loans 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is excellent, 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships 
are not open to students until they have been in the School for six months. 

University stipends or grants-in-aid are available to students in need of financial as- 
sistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted in amounts of $50 to $125. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship covers the cost of tuition and University fees for a de- 
gree candidate during her three years in the School. This scholarship has been given 
in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President of the Presbyterian Hospital Board of 
Trustees, by his family. 

Special scholarships are granted from time to time by individuals or groups. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow reasonable amounts 
without interest at any time after the first term. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in writing to the 
Department of Nursing. 

Graduate Study 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, offers 
to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work in the 
nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward a Master 
of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may be accepted for the work for 
the Bachelor of Science degree provided they meet the special requirements of the 
Division. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master of Science 
degree, are offered by the Department of Nursing to graduate nurses who hold accept- 
able bachelor's degrees and who have had satisfactory experience. 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing has two 
endowed funds for scholarships for advanced study in nursing. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 
Students 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a degree, 
certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of the 
University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as on the 
fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student of the 
University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection with the 
University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student registered in any 
school or college of the University shall at the same time be registered in any other 
school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other institution, without the 
consent of the appropriate dean or director. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Department 
of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the conditions 
of study in the Department. 

Academic Discipline 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by her of 
academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the granting of 
any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the University, which is 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it deems advisable. The 
disciplinary authority of die University is vested in the President in such cases as he 
deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the President, in the dean of each 
faculty and the director of the work of each administrative board. 

Withdrawal 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic standing 
and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the University, but no 
student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled to a discharge without the 
assent of her parent or guardian furnished in wridng to the Dean. Students withdrawing 
are required to notify the Registrar immediately. 

The Dean may, for reason of weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in good 
standing. 

Academic Requirements 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, according 
to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Quizzes and examinations are given at intervals. A deficiency examination will be 
required of every student failing to receive a passing grade (75 percent) in any course. 
Failure to obtain a passing grade will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat 
the course or to resign from the School. 

Graduation 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor of 
Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the prescribed 
course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by die Faculty of 
Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University degree, 
will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon recommendation 
of the Faculty of Medicine. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of the 
School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York, and, together 
with her state license to practice nursing (R.N.), it entitles her to membership in the 
American Nurses Association. 

Qualification for Registered Nurse (R.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held at intervals during the year under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Education of New York State. After passing these examinations the graduate 
nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse (R.N.). Graduates of the nursing course 
at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center are eligible for examination for registration. 

According to the law in New York State, only those persons who have filed intentions 
of becoming United States citizens may be admitted to the examinations for license to 
practice as registered nurses. Candidates who are not citizens should discuss this question 
carefully before filing application papers for entrance to the School. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Residence Hall 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the residence hall of the 
School of Nursing. It is a modern building of fireproof construction overlooking the 
Hudson River and is connected by an underground passage with the other buildings 
of the Medical Center. Living rooms, recreation facilities, the dining room, and the study 
hall are located in this building. Two new wings were added in 1945, increasing both 
the housing capacity and the library facilities. There are ten bedroom floors accommodat- 
ing 450 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort has 
been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence 
hall during the course of study, except during certain affiliations. 

Health Service 

The health of the student is closely supervised. A careful record is kept of hours of 
sleep and recreation. Physical examinations are made, whenever necessary, by the school 
physician, together with any laboratory investigation which may be indicated. All students 
have X-ray examinations of the chest and tuberculin tests at yearly intervals. Vaccinations 
with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) will be advised for those students whose tuberculin 
test is negative. The written consent of parents will be required before vaccination with 
BCG, as the procedure is optional. 

Students are under the care of the school physician or surgeon during their registration 
in the School. Within reasonable limits, the hospital assumes the cost of medical care. Each 
student will be expected, however, to meet the expenses of any dental care and eye 
refraction. 

Vacation 

A vacation of ten weeks is allowed each student: one week at Christmas during the 
preclinical term; four weeks each year during the first and second years; and two weeks 
in the third year. To the student entering with eight months' credit for her college degree, 
six weeks' vacation is allowed: one week at Christmas; four weeks at the end of the first 
year; and one week in the last year. The dates at which vacations are given are subject 
to the needs of the School and the Hospital. 

Religion 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may attend 
the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers are held each 
day and all students reporting on duty are required to attend. 

Student Activities 

The students are organized and governed by a Student Government Association with 
faculty advisers. Each class has also its own organization and officers. A periodical known 
as Student Prints is published quarterly by the students. Other activities include a dramatic 
club, lending library, glee club, forum club, orchestra, and Bible study group. 

Opportunities are provided for exercise and recreation through the use of the swim- 
ming pool, exercise room, and tennis courts. Under the direction of the Recreational 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Director, classes are given in swimming, dancing, corrective gymnastics, and tennis. The 
program is planned to meet the individual needs and interests of the student and to 
provide a wise use of leisure time. It is a recreational rather than a classroom program, 
but each student is required to participate in one or more of these activities. 

Students are encouraged to make use of the many opportunities offered in the city 
of New York for the enjoyment of music, art, and other intellectual pursuits. A station 
wagon is owned by the school. It is used to take groups of students on picnics to near-by 
recreational areas and beaches and also for professional visits to other institutions and 
agencies. Its purchase was made possible by the annual bazaar of the Senior Class, 1950. 

Teaching Facilities 

A fully equipped demonstration room and two practice rooms are located in the 
main Hospital building. Adjacent to these is a lecture room with a lantern screen. In- 
struction in invalid cookery is given in a special laboratory equipped for teaching purposes. 
The amphitheaters and laboratories of the School of Medicine are available for instruction 
in anatomy, bacteriology, chemistry, pathology, and pharmacology. 

A reference library, a study room, and an auditorium are located in Anna C. Maxwell 
Hall. It is possible through the use of the Anna C. Maxwell Reference Library Fund to 
keep the reference library supplied with the latest editions of approved reference books. 
The library of the School of Medicine of Columbia University is available to those desiring 
advanced professional study. 

Medical Center Bookstore 

The Medical Center Bookstore, located on the second floor of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, is maintained for the convenience of the students and staff of the Medical 
Center schools and hospitals. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other 
student supplies. Substantial savings are effected whenever the rules of manufacturers and 
publishers permit. The store is open on weekdays from 8:45 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 
8:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 



PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 15.) 

The first semester is arranged to give the student a basic understanding of the principles 
of nursing and related sciences. During this period the teaching is carried over into the 
clinical situation so that from the beginning the student is able to recognize the close 
relationship between her classroom learning and the nursing care of a patient. 

Throughout the remainder of the course her instruction in the classroom and in clinical 
experience on the wards is continued concurrently. The student is on duty for a forty-hour 
week, including time spent in the classroom. 

The block system of instruction, concentrating the classes into three definite periods, 
has been used for the past ten years. This arrangement has several advantages: the 
students are on day duty while attending class; the time spent in class is included in 
the eight hours on duty so that the number of hours on clinical services and the responsi- 
bilities given are decreased. In planning the student's experience in the various clinical 
areas, affiliations, and vacations, the outline of the block system is used. 




ENTRANCE TO ANNA C. MAXWELL MALL 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

Clinical Experience 

The first clinical assignments are to the general medical and surgical services where 
the student obtains supervised experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. Experience 
in the diet service, the operating room, and the recovery room is provided in the first 
year and a half. 

Because of the exceptional clinical facilities provided by the Medical Center, it is possible 
to give the students experience in caring for patients in specialized services such as 
gynecology, neurology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, otolaryngology, and urology, as 
well as in special research units. All of these services are not available to all students. 
However, each student is assisted to elect those services which will afford her a broad 
yet balanced training. The student's program is arranged so that her classroom and clinical 
practice are closely integrated. Thirty-six weeks of experience are provided for each 
student — twelve weeks each in obstetric, pediatric, and psychiatric nursing. 

Planned clinical conferences total approximately two and one-half hours per week. 
The teaching is patient-centered and is developed to assist the student to apply her 
knowledge and skill in nursing situations. During class blocks these clinical conferences 
are correlated with the subject currently being discussed in class, and at all times they 
are based on the needs of the patient and on the best means of meeting those needs. 
Doctors, nurses (students and graduates), social workers, nutritionists, and others who 
contribute to total patient care assist in this invaluable area of experience. Studies of the 
nursing needs of particular patients are made by the students and presented orally or in 
writing. 

A special program of instruction in Vanderbilt Clinic (the out-patient department of 
the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) is given each student during her eight weeks 
of service there. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to a special instructor. 
Field trips to various welfare agencies and institutions are arranged. Two weeks of in- 
struction and observation of nursing in the home are a part of every student's experience 
in connection with her out-patient department service. During this period attention is 
focused upon the preventive, educational, and social aspects of family health service, and 
the function of the public health nurse is interpreted both in action and in conference. 

Special elective clinical experience is offered to a limited number of students at the 
Mary Harkness Convalescent Home, one of the units of the Medical Center; in rural 
community nursing at the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N.Y.; in cancer 
nursing at the Memorial Hospital, New York City; in visiting nursing through the Visit- 
ing Nurse Service of New York; and in communicable disease nursing at the Willard 
Parker Hospital, New York City. 

Every effort is made to permit each student to have one or two elective services during 
the last six months in the school. These electives are scheduled in units of two or three 
months and may be in new clinical fields, in positions of junior administrative respon- 
sibility, or they may consist of advanced experience in a previous service. The elective 
assignments are possible only for those students whose basic clinical requirements have 
been completed and who have had a good health record. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Orientation. 15 hours (no academic credit). Professor Lee, Misses Lynch, Rathbun, 
Vanderbilt, and others. 

These hours are arranged during the first two weeks of the session. The program is designed to acquaint 
the student with the academic program for the first session, the facilities of the institution in general, 
the student residence, and the community. Techniques of study and other important subjects are presented. 
Social and cultural resources afforded by the metropolitan area are discussed as well as ways and means 
of using these resources to best advantage. Several excursions are arranged during this period. The 
program is carefully developed in cooperation with the Student Government Association ; its members 
have an active part in orienting the new students to further satisfactory community living. 

Anatomy and physiology, I. 75 hours. Professors Rogers and Mantel. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems of the 
human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. Lectures, 
group discussions, and laboratory demonstrations and dissections. 

Chemistry. 45 hours. Dr. Behre and Miss Gill. 

A course in chemistry as related and applied to physiology, microbiology, nutrition, and pharmacology. 
The major portion of the course is devoted to organic and biological chemistry. Laboratory, demonstrations, 
lectures, and class discussion. 

Introduction to nursing. 180 hours. Professors Lee and Pettit, Misses }. C. Brown, Fisher, 
Hamon, Rathbun, Reilly, and others. 

This unit is concerned with some of the major factors that contribute to professional nursing. The 
content of the courses, brief descriptions of which follow, is closely integrated. The student's past experience, 
current thinking, and clinical practice are guided toward a concept of total patient care. 

Community health. 15 hours. Miss Hamon. 

A study of some of the basic problems and responsibilities of the community related io health 
activities of specified organized groups, such as voluntary and official agencies for the control and 
advancement of health, and the role of the nurse as a contributing community member. 

Mental health. 15 hours. Dr. Ecker. 

A consideration of the basic principles of mental hygiene, recreation, relaxation, study and work 
schedules, and mental attitudes as they apply to the professional woman. Emphasis is placed on health 
as a factor in balanced, successful living. Problems associated with assisting others to maintain optimum 
health practices as related to the nurse-patient situation are discussed. 

Professional adjustments, I. 15 hours. Professor Lee and Miss Lynch. 

A consideration of professional attitudes and responsibilities including interpersonal relationships 
between the nurse and her patient, other members of the "health team," and individuals or groups con- 
cerned directly and indirectly with patient care. 

Nursing arts, I. 135 hours. Professor Pettit, Misses J. C. Brown, Fisher, Reilly, and others. 

An introduction to the basic principles of nursing with emphasis on the differences between health 
and sickness; the meaning of an illness to an individual and to his family; the relationship of the nurse 
to the patient and to other members of the "health team." The importance of a proper environment and 
the problems in maintaining it are studied. Nursing techniques related to general hygienic care and simple 
therapeutic procedures are demonstrated and practiced in the classroom and on the clinical services. An 
introduction to the problems of rehabilitation and the principles underlying various related therapies are 
presented by films, lectures, and clinical observation. Supervised clinical practice in the care of mildly 
ill or convalescent patients is afforded concurrently — five hours per week supplemented by two hours of 
planned clinical teaching. This is designed to assist the student to apply the principles of nursing to the 
actual care of the patient. 

Microbiology. 45 hours. Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course covering the general principles of applied microbiology, immunology, sterilization, 
and bacteriologic technique. Special emphasis is placed on prophylaxis and common pathogenic bacteria. 
Lectures, laboratory exercises, and class discussion. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

Nutrition and cookery. 45 hours. Miss Frank. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods are 
classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced through 
the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the standards for a 
normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the preparation 
of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The lessons are planned 
with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared in one lesson and are 
served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature of the food, general arrange- 
ment, and attractiveness of the tray. In planning the meals the economic factor is stressed and low-cost 
meals are prepared. 

Pharmacology, I. 15 hours. Miss Gill. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles of drug administration, 
pharmaceutic preparations in common use, types of drug action, legislation concerning drug administration, 
and the fundamental knowledge necessary preceding the study of advanced pharmacology. The use of the 
metric and apothecary systems of measurements are studied to enable the student to compute dosages of 
drugs and to prepare solutions. A test in arithmetic precedes the course. 

Physical education. 30 hours. Miss Rathbun. 

An orientation course in fundamental body mechanics, swimming, tennis, square and folk dancing, 
team sports, and hiking in order to assist the student to select an activity which she will enjoy pursuing. 
Physical education is required during the three-year course, but activities are elective after the Winter 
Session. 

SPRING SESSION 

Nursing in medicine and surgery. 180 hours. 

In this unit the relationship of the subjects to be discussed has been carefully considered. Eighty hours 
are devoted to the actual role of the nurse in caring for patients with medical and surgical conditions. 
Problem-solving techniques are used extensively in the classroom and in the clinical situation. There is 
concurrent clinical practice in general medicine, general surgery, and the diet service. In addition to 
this there is planned clinical teaching of two and one-half hours per week which includes nursing con- 
ferences and doctor's clinics. 

Medical nursing. 30 hours. Dr. Cosgriff and Miss Gill. 

This course discusses the fundamentals of specific diseases, their causes, treatment, and implications 
for the patient. The relationship of disease, its specific treatment (including drugs), and nursing care 
will be considered through problem-solving techniques in group discussion. 

Surgical nursing. 30 hours. Dr. Ferrer and Professor Mantel. 

In this course a study is made of the nature, causes, symptoms, and treatment of major surgical 
conditions. The specific nursing necessary for the care of patients with these conditions is considered in 
the group discussions. 

Application of the principles of surgical techniques is presented in ten hours of planned clinical 
teaching and supplemented by supervised practice in assisting with surgical dressings and minor surgical 
procedures. 

Pharmacology, II. 30 hours. Dr. Plimpton and Miss Gill. 

This course is a continuation of Pharmacology, I and studies drugs from the point of view of their 
therapeutic action. The role of drugs in the treatment of disease is considered in group discussions. 
Clinical application is gained through twenty hours of planned instruction in small groups. Experience 
in the administration of drugs is gained through supervised practice offered concurrently with the afore- 
mentioned instruction. 

Nursing arts, II. 60 hours. Professor Pettit, Misses J. C. Brown, Fisher, and Reilly. 

This course forms the core around which the nursing associated with specific medical and surgical 
conditions is developed. Group development techniques are used to bring out the pertinent nursing care 
problems. The integration of the content with the other courses in this unit is suggested in the course 
descriptions. Advanced nursing skills are discussed, demonstrated, and practiced in the classroom. 

Diet therapy. 15 hours. Miss Frank. 

This course is correlated with the course in medical and surgical nursing so that the student studies 
the disease and its dietary treatment at the same time. The normal diet is used as the basis for planning 
therapeutic diets. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of adapting the diet to the patient's individual 
' needs — social, racial, and economic. 



24 C OLUMBIA UN I VERS I TY 

Elements of pathology. 15 hours. Drs. Frank, King, and others. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various methods of clinical diagnosis 
and of the terms used in describing pathological conditions. Demonstrations, class discussions, and 
laboratory work will illustrate the nature of abnormal changes in tissues. 

Anatomy and physiology, II. 30 hours. Professors Gusberg, Knowlton, and Sciarra; Drs. 
Ferrer, Frank, and others; and Professor Mantel. 

A course of lectures with demonstrations emphasizing normal physiology and physiological changes 
associated with selected medical and surgical conditions. 

Mental health. 15 hours. Dr. Ecker. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human behavior, 
directed toward giving the student an understanding of the basic emotional needs of an individual and 
commonly encountered defense mechanisms. 



SECOND YEAR 

Medical and surgical specialties. 60 hours. 

Nursing in communicable diseases. 15 hours. 

Lectures are given by specialists in the communicable diseases describing the early recognition of 
symptoms and importance of good nursing care. The nurse's responsibility and opportunities for preventive 
work are stressed. Nursing classes and demonstrations of isolation technique are given by nurse instructors. 

Urological nursing. 5 hours. Dr. Lattimer. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the principles of diseases of the genitourinary tract. Each student has 
one month's experience on the urological service, where a regular program of teaching is given. 

Gynecological nursing. 5 hours. Dr. Gusberg. 

A study of the female reproductive organs, their functions and the pathological conditions requiring 
gynecological treatment. During the student's month of clinical experience, additional classes and con- 
ferences are given by the resident physician and nurse instructor emphasizing the emotional aspects of 
gynecological nursing and family sociologic needs for satisfactory rehabilitation. 

Nursing in diseases of the nervous system. 5 hours. Professor Sciarra and Mrs. Delabarre. 

A brief survey of medical and surgical aspects of neurologic diseases. Nursing in diseases of the nervous 
system is correlated with spinal cord and brain lesions. 

Nursing in otolaryngology. 5 hours. Professor Baker. 

The lectures of this course include a review of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, and throat 
and the care and treatment of some of the diseases of these organs. 

Nursing in ophthalmology. 10 hours. Dr. Chace and Miss Wright. 

This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of the eye and with a few of the common diseases 
and their treatment. The preventive aspect is stressed. Classes are held in the Institute of Ophthalmology. 
Illustrated lectures and class discussion. 

Operating room technique. 5 hours. Mrs. Mellor. 

A brief history of surgery and the meaning of aseptic technique. Other topics included are the equipment 
of an operating room, instruments, methods of sterilization for the various materials used in preparing 
for operations, transfusions, etc. These classes are concurrent with the operating room experience. 

Orthopedic nursing. 5 hours. Drs. Bragg, Carroll, Strassburger, and Watkins. 

Lectures covering the most common orthopedic conditions and their nursing care. 

Surgical emergencies. 5 hours. Miss Lynch. 

A review of the basic knowledge essential to the intelligent management of emergency situations as 
they may arise in daily life. Student discussion is promoted to develop preventive aspects of the accident 
problem both in industry and in the home. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 

History of nursing. 15 hours. Professor Lee. 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing traditions 
and ideals, the stages of development through which nursing has passed, and the people and influences 
which have molded the profession to its present form. The lectures are illustrated by lantern slides. 
Recitations, reports on collateral reading, and individual projects. 

Nursing arts, III. 15 hours. Professor Pettit and others. 

A course planned to assist the student to give expert nursing care to patients with conditions considered 
as medical and surgical specialties, and to apply this and her previously acquired knowledge to initiate 
expert nursing care in hospitals and homes. Special emphasis is placed on the nurse's responsibility for 
patient teaching. 

Professional adjustments, II. 15 hours. Miss Lynch. 

A discussion course dealing with problems in nursing and nursing care. Particular problems encountered 
by the students are analyzed and possible solutions considered. Experts in many fields — legal, religious, 
medical, nursing, administration — contribute to the thinking as consultants. 

Modern social problems. 15 hours. Miss Geyer. 

The aim of this course is to emphasize some of the social and economic factors which have an important 
bearing on the patient's condition, both as to cause and effect. Methods of teaching include study, pres- 
entation, and discussion of illustrative cases and collateral reading. 



SECOND OR THIRD YEAR 

Obstetric nursing. 45 hours. Professor Allanach, Miss Cameron, and members of the De- 
partment of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

This course aims to emphasize the fact that obstetrics is a physiologic process rather than a pathologic 
one ; to assist the student in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and practice safe 
care of the mother and her baby during the maternity period ; and to develop an awareness of responsibility 
to teach health principles to the mother as an integral part of obstetric nursing. 

Lectures and clinics are given by obstetricians ; classes and demonstrations by the nurse instructor and 
dietitians. 

Pediatric nursing. 45 hours. Professor Peto, Misses Bullick, Kent, Rodenhiser, and mem- 
bers of the Department of Pediatrics. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of normal and abnormal conditions 
of childhood and to teach her the technique necessary for the nursing of sick children. The students 
receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervision of practice on the wards 
and in the Vanderbilt Clinic. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instructors, 
dietitians, and a nursery-school teacher at the Babies Hospital, one of the units of the Medical Center. 

The course is parallel to the clinical experience on the pediatric service, covering a twelve-week period. 

Professional adjustments, III. 30 hours. Professor Lee and others. 

The aim of this course is to prepare the student for her specific responsibilities as a graduate nurse 
in membership in professional organizations and in leadership in community activities. 

Major fields offering careers to professional nurses are studied by student committees. Committee 
membership is determined by the student's particular interest. Group development techniques are used to 
explore the various areas. Consultants from each field assist in the discussions and observations of practices 
within each field are made. 

; Psychiatric nursing. 105 hours. Professors Lewis and MacKinnon, Miss Morgan, and 
other members of the Department of Psychiatry and the New York State Psychiatric 
Institute. 

The aim of this affiliation is to give the student an understanding of cause, prevention, therapy, and 
nursing care of psychiatric conditions. Methods used include lectures, discussions, written and oral 
reports, case studies, conferences, demonstrations, and field trips. 

Theory and practice in the total care of the patient include the contributions of associated disciplines 
in the hospital and the fundamental dynamics of behavior and their relationship to mental illness. 
Orientation to some of the better-known schools of thought, with emphasis on the contribution of dynamic 



26 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

psychiatry to nursing. The relation of psychiatric nursing to general nursing and personal development 
is also stressed. The program consists of twelve weeks of supervised practice at the New York State 
Psychiatric Institute and 105 hours of classroom instruction with about 45 hours of ward teaching. Special 
emphasis is placed on newer methods of therapy. 




ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED 
AT ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 






^ 



.,^lum| KVa ^ F sity 
bulletin of information 



Fifty-second Series, No. 39 



MEDICAL LIBRARY 



c^M^- 



October 11, 1952 






*h 




M 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 



)EPARTME 




F NURSING 




OF THE 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPIT 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




FOR THE WINT 



SESSIONS 




!■ 

OLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

630 WEST I 68TH STREET • NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Columbia <&ntoergirp ^Bulletin of information 

Fifty-second Series, No. 39 October 11, 1052 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N.Y., weekly from 
January for forty-two consecutive issues. Reentered as second-class matter October 24, 
1951, at the Post Office at New York, N.Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 
1917, authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to the Trustees and the Announcements 
of the several Colleges and Schools relating to the work of the next year. These are made 
as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon written 
application to the Office of University Admissions, 322 University Hall, Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York 27, N.Y. Copies may be obtained in person from the Office of the 
Secretary, 213 Low Memorial Library. 

C. U. P. 8,000 — 1952 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRBSS 



Columbia University 

in the City of New York 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OF THE 

FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 

I 95 2 " I 953 




COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

630 WEST i68th STREET 

NEW YORK 32, N.Y. 



CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 3 

Faculty of Medicine 4 

Officers of Instruction 6 

Presbyterian Hospital 

officers 10 

administrative staff, nursing service 1 1 

History of the School of Nursing 12 

Choice of a Profession . 13 

Careers in Nursing 13 

Nursing Course 

application 15 

basic course 15 

admission 16 

registration 17 

FEES , 17 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 17 

GRADUATE STUDY l8 

General Regulations 

STUDENTS l8 

academic discipline 10 

withdrawal iq 

academic requirements iq 

graduation iq 

qualification for registered nurse iq 

General Information 20 

Program of Instruction 22 

Courses of Instruction 

first year 25 

second year 27 

third year 28 




Harold Haliday Costain 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL FROM FORT WASHINGTON AVENUE 




W urts Brothers 



ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL, SCHOOL OF NURSING RESIDENCE 






CONDENSED ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The complete academic calendar for the year 1952-1953 may be obtained from the 
Secretary of the University. 

1952 

September 3 Wednesday. Orientation program for the Class of 1955. 

September 4 Thursday. Registration (including the payment of fees) for all students 

in the Department of Nursing. 

September 5 Friday. Winter Session begins for the Class of 1955, First Year. 

September 16 Tuesday. Winter Session begins for the Class of 1954, Second Year. 

November 4 Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday. 

November 27 Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

December 22 Monday. Vacation for the Class of 1955. 1 



1953 
January 6 Tuesday. Completion of course for Group A students of the Class of 

1953- 

February 2 Monday. Spring Session begins for the Class of 1955, First Year. 

February 22 Sunday. Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

May 30 Saturday. Memorial Day. Holiday. 

May 31 Sunday. Baccalaureate Service for the Class of 1953. 

June 2 Tuesday. Conferring of degrees on students of the Class of 1952 and 

Group A students of the Class of 1953. Ceremony at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

June 4 Thursday. Conferring of diplomas on the Class of 1953. Ceremony at 

Presbyterian Hospital. 

July 4 Saturday. Independence Day. Holiday. 

September 6 Sunday. Completion of course for Group B and Group C students of 
the Class of 1953. 

September 7 Monday. Labor Day. Holiday. 

1 In the first year of the course, one week of vacation is arranged during the Christmas holiday period. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Dwight D. Eisenhower, LL.D President of the University 

Grayson Kirk, Ph.D., LL.D Vice President and Provost of the University 

Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Med.Sc.D. . . Vice President in Charge of 

Medical Affairs; Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, Ph.D Associate Dean and Secretary 

James E. McCormack, A.B., M.D Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) 

Harold W. Brown, M.D., D.P.H Associate Dean (Public Health) 

Maurice J. Hickey, D.M.D., M.D Associate Dean (Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Eleanor Lee, A.B., R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 






THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson 
Dana W. Atchley 
Frank B. Berry 
James Bordley III 
Haroid W. Brown 
Charles L. Buxton 
George F. Cahill 
E. Gurney Clark 
Hans T. Clarke 
Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
Robert C. Darling 
Richard L. Day 
D. Anthony D'Esopo 
Samuel R. Detwiler 
John H. Dunnington 
Earl T. Engle 
John W. Fertig 
Thomas P. Fleming 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 
Virginia K. Frantz 
Alfred Gilman 
Ross Golden 
Leonard J. Goldwater 
Magnus I. Gregersen 
Alexander B. Gutman 

CUSHMAN D. HAAGENSEN 

Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Houghton Holliday 
George H. Humphreys II 
Yale Kneeland, Jr. 
Nolan D. C. Lewis 
Robert F. Loeb 



Ewing C. McBeath 
James E. McCormack 
Rustin McIntosh 
Monroe A. McIver 
Irville H. MacKinnon 
Rollo J. Masselink 
H. Houston Merritt 
Frederick A. Mettler 
Edgar G. Miller, Jr. 
Carl T. Nelson 
John L. Nickerson 
Emanuel M. Papper 
William Barclay Parsons 
George A. Perera 
J. Lawrence Pool 
Willard C. Rappleye 
Dickinson W. Richards, Jr. 
Henry A. Riley 
Walter S. Root 
Harry M. Rose 
Beatrice C. Seegal 
David Seegal 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 
Lawrence W. Sloan 
Alan DeForest Smith 
Gilbert P. Smith 
Harry P. Smith 
Isidore Snapper 
Lewis R. Stowe 
Howard C. Taylor 
Kenneth B. Turner 
Harry B. van Dyke 
Theodore J. C. von Storch 
Jerome P. Webster 



Abner Wolf 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

NURSING EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Lee, Chairman, Harold W. Brown, Samuel R. Detwiler, George H. Hum- 
phreys II, Nolan D. C. Lewis, Robert F. Loeb, Rustin McIntosh, Edgar G. Miller, Jr., 
J. M. Ada Mutch, Marjorie Peto, Helen F. Pettit, Howard C. Taylor, the Dean, 
ex officio 

ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Lee, Chairman, Josephine C. Brown, Ruth A. Lynch, Eula Rathbun, 
Florence L. Vanderbilt, the Dean, ex officio 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor oj Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department oj Nursing 
A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

Mary Elizabeth Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Harriet Mantel Deleuran, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1936 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927 



Frances H. Barrows, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Josephine Camilla Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Duke, 1942; B.S., Columbia, 1945; A.M., 195 1; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1945 

Lillian C. Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Hunter, 1942; B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Annie E. Bullick, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1949; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1949 

Beth L. Cameron, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 

Helen Christensen Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; A.M., 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Dolores Charlotte Farrell, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1952; Graduate, Cochran School of Nursing, 1947 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 

Ruth M. Guinter, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 193 1 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Margaret A. Hogan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Cooley Dickinson School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., Columbia, 1943; A.M., 1946 

Rose Mary Hoynak, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Elizabeth M. Kennedy, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University, 1945; Graduate, Providence Division of Catholic University School of Nurs- 
ing Education, 1945 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Ruth A. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932; A.M., New York University, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; 
Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Margaret E. MacIntire, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 

Lucille D. Manning, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York State College for Teachers, 1935; B.S., Columbia, 1949; Graduate, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1949 

Josephine E. Mellor, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939 

Susan B. Moore, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., American University, 1939; B.S., Columbia, 1944; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1943 

Edith E. Morgan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia 1943; A.M., 1951; Graduate, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 1929 

Dorothy Elizabeth Re illy, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; M.S., Boston, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Ellen Garinger Smith, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Marjorie Helen Stewart, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1944; B.S., Columbia, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1950 

Shirley Louise Tanner Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Idaho, 1950; M.S., Columbia, 1952 

Yvonne A. Trebilcock, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1948 



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 



Eula W. Rathbun Recreational Director 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925; A.M., Columbia, 1946 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

BASIC SCIENCES 

Anatomy and Physiology 
Members of the Departments of Anatomy and Physiology 

Chemistry 
Jeannette A. Behre, Ph.D Associate in Biochemistry 

Microbiology 
Margaret Holden, Ph.D Associate in Microbiology 

MODERN SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

Elizabeth Sessoms, A.M Assistant Director, Social Service 

Department, Presbyterian Hospital 

NURSING IN MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

Daniel C. Baker, Jr., M.D., Med.ScD. . Assistant Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology 

Robert R. Chace, M.D., Med.ScD Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Stuart W. Cosgriff, M.D., Med.ScD Associate in Medicine 

Jose M. Ferrer, Jr., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Charles W. Frank, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Saul B. Gusberg, M.D., Med.ScD. . . . Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 

Donald W. King, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Abbie I. Knowlton, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John K. Lattimer, M.D., Med.ScD Associate in Urology 

Calvin H. Plimpton, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Daniel Sciarra, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

OBSTETRICAL NURSING 

Arnold N. Fenton, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ruth C. Harris, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Equinn W. Munnell, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 




WATCHING AN OPERATION IN THE EYE INSTITUTE 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING g 

Harold Speert, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles M. Steer, M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Professor of Clinical 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Susan W. Williamson, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

Stanley Berlow, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Douglas S. Damrosch, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 
(including Mental Health) 

Paul D. Ecker, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

William A. Horwitz, M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 

Phillip Polatin, M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 






PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

OFFICERS 

Charles P. Cooper, President 

Henry C. Alexander, Vice President 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr., Vice President 

William Hale Harkness, Vice President 

Frederick A. O. Schwarz, Vice President 

John Sloane, Vice President 

Carll Tucker, Vice President 

Edward C. Bench, Treasurer 

Joseph A. Thomas, Assistant Treasurer 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Secretary 

Thatcher M. Brown, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



TRUSTEES 



Cornelius R. Agnew 
Malcolm P. Aldrich 
Winthrop W. Aldrich 
Henry C. Alexander 
Bruce Barton 
Edward C. Bench 
John E. Bierwirth 
William E. Birdsall 
Thatcher M. Brown, Jr. 
Robert W. Carle 
Hugh J. Chisholm 
Charles P. Cooper 
William Sheffield Cowles 
Cleo Frank Craig 
Pierpont V. Davis 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison 
Johnston de Forest 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham 
John I. Downey 
John M. Franklin 
Artemus L. Gates 
William S. Gray 



Peter Grimm 

William E. S. Griswold, Sr. 
W. E. S. Griswold, Jr. 
William Hale Harkness 
John W. Hornor 
Mrs. Yale Kneeland 
Robert A. Lovett 
James C. Mackenzie 
Samuel W. Meek 

DUNLEVY MlLBANK 

Charles S. Munson 
Edgar A. Newberry 
Frederick A. O. Schwarz 
John Sloane 
John P. Stevens, Jr. 
Benjamin Strong 
Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 
Joseph A. Thomas 
Carll Tucker 
William J. Wardall 
Sidney J. Weinberg 
Mrs. Sheldon Whitehouse 



HONORARY TRUSTEES 



Charles E. Adams 
Thatcher M. Brown, Sr. 
William A. Delano 
George Lauder Greenway 
Charles Barney Harding 



Rev. John O. Mellin 
Charles S. Payson 
Bayard W. Read 
Edgar F. Romig, D.D. 
Dean Sage 



Rev. James Grey Spence 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING u 

NURSING 

W. E. S. Griswold, Jr., Chairman 
Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice Chairman 
Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice Chairman 

Miss Marie C. Byron Mrs. Stephen H. Philbin 

Mrs. Benjamin Coates J. Lawrence Pool, M.D. 

Miss Margaret Eliot Willasd C. Rappleye, M.D. 

George H. Humphreys II, M.D. Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 

Miss Eleanor Lee Mrs. Byron Stookey 

Robert F. Loeb, M.D. Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. Howard C. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 

H. Houston Merritt, M.D. Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 

Mrs. Grover O'Neill Mrs. Staunton Williams 
John S. Parke, ex officio 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Acting Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1 

Florence C. Barends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

A. Beatrice Langmuir, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, ^27 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1925 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, i95r; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1929 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Phyllis M. Young, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 



HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is one of the large, modern medical 
centers of the East. The specialized hospitals of the Medical Center have histories and 
enviable professional reputations dating back many years prior to their merger to form 
the Medical Center. The Presbyterian Hospital is traditionally progressive because of the 
constant study for improved methods of health care. This concept was first introduced 
with the founding of Presbyterian Hospital in 1868 and has continued through the years, 
as has its original aim of "affording medical and surgical aid and nursing care to sick or 
disabled persons of every creed, nationality, and color." The clinical facilities and oppor- 
tunities for learning are vast. 

The School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital was founded in 1892 by the Board 
of Managers. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., A.M., the first Director of the School, es- 
tablished the plans for administration and instruction and guided them for thirty years. 
Her contribution had a lasting effect upon the growth of the profession to its present 
dignity and importance. Over three thousand nurses have been graduated since the open- 
ing of the school. 

The Hospital's interest in teaching was further demonstrated by affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia 
University. This led to a permanent affiliation between the two institutions in 1921. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center at 168th Street, overlooking the Hudson 
River, was opened in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness and her 
son, Edward S. Harkness; both were generous contributors to the project. The Medical 
Center has continued to expand according to the needs of the community, medical re- 
search, and education. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, and in 1937 
the University established the Department of Nursing of the Faculty of Medicine. This 
affiliation marked another step in the integration of the University and the hospitals at 
the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. The Department of Nursing is approved by 
the National Nursing Accrediting Service and holds associate membership in the Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Schools of Nursing. 

AIMS 

For both the degree and the nondegree students, the aim of the basic professional 
nursing program is to prepare qualified young women to practice nursing effectively in 
hospitals, homes, and in the various types of health agencies. 

The degree program, in addition to the above, is so planned that students in this group 
have the opportunity to utilize and further develop the greater maturity and educational 
experience which they bring to the situation. The wide and varied experiences of this 
program are directed toward challenging the students' knowledge and skills, tangible 
and intangible. 

In both the degree and the nondegree programs, nursing is interpreted as including 
health promotion through education, care of the sick and injured, and restoration to a 
useful place in society. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 13 

Throughout her nursing education, the student is encouraged and provided the 
opportunity to become aware of the social and health needs of individuals and the com- 
munity, their effect upon the trends in national thinking, as well as the present and 
possible contribution of nursing to human welfare. 

Opportunity is provided for the continued development of the student physically, 
mentally, emotionally, and culturally with emphasis on her interests, needs, and responsi- 
bilities as a person, a member of the nursing profession, and as a citizen. 

The student is introduced to the various opportunities in nursing and is helped to 
select for further study and experience that field of nursing in which she will find her 
greatest satisfaction and to which she can make her optimum contribution. 



THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The young woman today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open to her as she 
considers her future. 

The spotlight of public opinion is strongly focused on nursing as the need for the 
services of skilled, intelligent professional nurses continues. Estimates of the probable 
number required for the maintenance of health services throughout the nation, in Army, 
Navy, civilian, and veterans hospitals and in urban and rural communities, call for many 
more professional nurses than are available at present. 

The pursuit of nursing is significant for more than a career. A professional education 
in nursing affords one of the best preparations for the varied responsibilities of marriage. 
Graduate nurses have proven themselves to be valuable members of governing boards of 
many organizations in communities all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly. 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical defect 
is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to mention may 
be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements are outlined on page 16. The School will welcome an oppor- 
tunity to guide its candidates well in advance of the date of entrance. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a hospital before en- 
tering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities for trying out practical "work- 
samples" of nursing and securing some contact with patients, even at an elementary 
level. Such a procedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for 
nursing and the seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 

CAREERS IN NURSING 

The program in nursing at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center offers excellent 
preparation for the countless opportunities which are open to registered professional 
nurses in different fields. The three traditional classifications are private duty, institutional 
nursing, and public health nursing. 

There are opportunities for important service and influence in a number of government 
services — the Veterans Administration, the Public Health Service, and the Army and the 
Navy Nurse Corps. 

In the institutional field the majority of graduate nurses begin their careers in general 
duty, advancing into head-nursing, supervisory, or teaching positions as their experience 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

and achievement warrant. There are many opportunities for those who wish to specialize 
in various clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, psychiatry, or 
orthopedics. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes the familiar visiting nursing, school and 
industrial nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

Many universities give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing to prepare them- 
selves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, or in public 
health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in the hospital, the home, the industrial plant, or 
the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility and honor. 
She is constandy in contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the 
industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with governmental and voluntary 
relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the community. American nurses 
have a large share of responsibility in restoring health and welfare services in many 
parts of the world. The opportunities for service increase rather than diminish, both at 
home and abroad. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSES 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and must 
present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal application 
in writing on blanks supplied by the school. After the application has been submitted, 
the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Department of Nursing from 
the college or high school attended. It is desirable to make application at least one year 
in advance of the date of desired entrance. Students entering from high school should 
present a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their school, 
together with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such specific require- 
ment is made for college students, preference is always given to those who have shown 
evidence of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. An official transcript 
of the academic record may be required by the New York State Education Department, 
since all students in registered schools of nursing must be approved by that Department. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for the physical 
examination by the school physician will be made by the Department of Nursing, probably 
within six months of the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time of 
admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, therefore, 
come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

APPLICATION BLANKS 

Application blanks and any further information about the course in nursing may be 
secured from the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University, 630 
West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of Columbia 
University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered as University 
students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences; theory and practice of 
nursing techniques; clinical experience in medical, surgical, obstetric, pediatric, and 
psychiatric nursing; nutrition; and various specialties and electives in the Presbyterian 
Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic course 
is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college education 
are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the classroom and on 
the wards. 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See page 16.) 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic courses under one of the following classifications: 

Group A — Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced rime 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for 
the diploma. Courses in natural science including chemistry, psychology, and sociology 
should be included in the college courses. 

Group B — Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a 
college approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Department 
may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. Such students 
are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. 
The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this basis should include: 

Points 

Requirements: Chemistry, 1 physics, or biology 8 

English 6 

Psychology 6 

Sociology 6 26 

Electives: Language, history, mathematics, economics, philosophy, or 

religion, 2 fine arts or supplementary courses in the required 
fields 34 

No credit will be granted for commercial, home economics, physical education, 
or vocational courses. No credit will be granted for any one-point course. 

This program is frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or 
university elsewhere and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C — Students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to 
Columbia University and the New York State Education Department, and who show 
evidence of satisfactory academic preparation in sixteen units of subject matter, including 
those who have completed college study not meeting the requirements outlined under A 
and B, may register for the three-year basic course, receiving the diploma in nursing upon 
completion. Students entering on this basis must meet the requirements as prescribed by 
the New York State Education Department and the requirements for entrance to the 
School of Nursing as follows: 

English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry and either biology or general science) ; 
mathematics, 1 unit (algebra or geometry); history or social studies, 2 units; 
electives, 7 units in 2- or 3-unit sequences in languages or the above required sub- 
jects. A total of 16 units is required, and the University allows no credit for com- 
mercial or home economics courses. 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study be approved by the 
University before final selections are made. Applicants should therefore communicate 
with the Department of Nursing two years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

1 Chemistry is required if it has not been taken in high school. 

a A maximum of six credits may be allowed for courses in religion or speech. 




THE COLUMBI 




EDICAL CENTER 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank giving such 
information as may be required. Registration takes place in Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort 
Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on the first Thursday in September. 

FEES 

The application fee of $10 is payable with the application. It covers the cost of assembling 
credentials and of the physical examination and aptitude tests, the results of which 
determine the candidate's eligibility. This fee is not returnable regardless of the action 
taken on the application for admission. 

The University fee of $40 for the academic year or fraction thereof is payable each 
year on the day of registration in September. The application fee is credited on the 
University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay a 
tuition fee of $500 in two installments: $250 at the beginning of the first year and $250 
at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates for the 
diploma pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the beginning of the 
first year and $200 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the probable 
cost of the course in nursing (see page 16 for classification). The cost of the college study 
preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend entirely upon the 
institution attended. 

Group A 
Application % 20 

First tuition 250 

Second tuition 250 

University fees 80 

Degree application 20 



All checks for tuition and University fees must be made payable to Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable amount 
of laundry without charge. In the first term of the first year the student provides her own 
uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $75 to the above totals. 
School uniforms are provided by the Hospital for the remainder of the nursing course. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Twenty-five dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations. 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $50 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and ward practice is high, whose health is excellent, 
and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships 
are not open to students until they have been in the School for six months. 



Group B 


Group C 


$ 20 


$ 20 


250 


200 


250 


200 


100 


100 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

University stipends or grants-in-aid are available to students in need of financial as- 
sistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted in amounts of $50 to $125. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship covers the cost of tuition and University fees for a de- 
gree candidate during her three years in the School. This scholarship has been given 
in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President of the Presbyterian Hospital Board of 
Trustees, by his family. 

Special scholarships are granted from time to time by individuals or groups. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow reasonable amounts 
without interest at any time after the first term. 

Limited opportunity for employment is open to students with good academic, com- 
munity, and health records. Selected appointments for child care and clerical assistance 
in the Tod Memorial Library and general typing provide opportunity for earning money. 
It should be understood, however, that at best this earning can only supplement in- 
cidental expenses. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in writing to the 
Department of Nursing. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, offers 
to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work in the 
nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward a Master 
of Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may be accepted for the work for 
the Bachelor of Science degree provided they meet the special requirements of the 
Division. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master of Science 
degree, are offered by the Department of Nursing to graduate nurses who hold accept- 
able bachelor's degrees and who have had satisfactory experience. 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing has two 
endowed funds for scholarships for advanced study in nursing. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

STUDENTS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a degree, 
certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of the 
University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as on the 
fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student of the 
University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection with the 
University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student registered in any 
school or college of the University shall at the same time be registered in any other 
school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other institution, without the 
specific authorization of the dean or director of the school or college of the University 
in which she is first registered. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Department 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 19 

of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the conditions 
of study in the Department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by her of 
academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the granting of 
any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the University, which is 
free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it deems advisable. The 
disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the President in such cases as he 
deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the President, in the dean of each 
faculty and the director of the work of each administrative board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic standing 
and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the University; but no 
student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entided to a discharge without the 
assent of her parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Executive Officer of the De- 
partment of Nursing. Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar 
immediately. 

The Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing may, for reason of weight, grant 
a leave of absence to a student in good standing. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 per cent in each subject, according 
to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

Academic evaluations are made at intervals. A deficiency examination will be required 
of every student failing to receive a passing grade in any course. A fee of $3.00, payable 
before the examination, will be charged for each deficiency examination. Failure to 
obtain a passing grade will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course 
or to resign from the School. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor of 
Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the prescribed 
course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the Faculty of 
Medicine. 

Every student completing the course, whether or not she obtains the University degree, 
will receive the diploma in nursing from the Presbyterian Hospital, upon recommendation 
of the Faculty of Medicine. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of the 
School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York, and, together 
with her state license to practice nursing (R.N.), it entitles her to membership in the 
American Nurses Association and other professional organizations. 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSE (R.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Having met these 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held at intervals during the year under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Education of New York State. After passing these examinations the graduate 
nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse (R.N.). Graduates of the Department 
of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University, are eligible for examination for 
registration. 

According to the law in New York State, only those persons who have filed intentions 
of becoming United States citizens may be admitted to the examinations for license to 
practice as registered nurses. Candidates who are not citizens should discuss this question 
carefully before filing application papers for entrance to the School. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the residence of the School 
of Nursing. A modern building of fireproof construction overlooking the Hudson River, 
it is connected by underground passage with the other buildings of the Medical Center. 
Reception rooms, dining room, snack bar, library, and recreational facilities (including 
a swimming pool) are located in this building. Two wings were added in 1945, increasing 
both the housing capacity and the library facilities. There are ten bedroom floors accom- 
modating 475 students. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort 
has been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence 
hall during the course of study. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Emphasis is placed on the importance of healthful living and the particular significance 
of this to the nurse as a person and as a health teacher. Through individual and group 
conferences, as well as student committees of the Student Government Association, health 
practices and student activities are carefully considered. Every effort is made to maintain 
a positive approach to the individual's responsibility for her own well-being, both emotional 
and physical. 

The health of the student is closely supervised. Physical examinations are made at 
regularly scheduled periods and at other times when necessary by the school physician; 
laboratory investigations are made when indicated. Chest X-ray and tuberculin tests are 
done semiannually. Vaccinations with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) are advised for 
those students whose tuberculin tests are negative. The written consent of parents is re- 
quired before vaccination with BCG, as the procedure is optional. Students are under the 
care of the school physician or surgeon during their registration in the school. Con- 
sultants in all the specialties are available when needed. Within reasonable limits, the 
hospital assumes the cost of medical care of illness originating during the student period. 
The expenses of dental care and eye refraction must be borne by the student. 

VACATION 

A vacation of ten weeks is allowed each student: one week at Christmas during the 
first year; four weeks each year during the first and second years; and two weeks in 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 21 

the third year. To the student entering with eight months' credit for her college degree, 
six weeks' vacation is allowed: one week at Christmas; four weeks at the end of the first 
year; and one week in the last year. The dates at which vacations are given are subject 
to the needs of the School. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may attend 
the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning prayers are held each 
day and all students reporting on duty are expected to attend. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The cocurricular program, sponsored by the Student Government Association, is under 
the guidance of the recreational director and class advisors. Dances and parties are given 
and there are dramadc and glee clubs, sports tournaments, and Bible study and hobby 
groups. Student Prints, written and edited by students, is published quarterly. Vital Signs 
is the student newspaper. The Student Handbook, published by the Student Government 
Association, contains a detailed account of the various student activities as well as the 
constitution and by-laws of the Association. 

Student clubs and interest groups are always encouraged. Certain activities on the 
Columbia University Morningside Heights Campus and many events of the Medical 
School are open to students in the Department of Nursing. 

Tennis courts in the hospital garden and the swimming pool, gymnasium, and game 
room in Maxwell Hall offer opportunity for exercise. A station wagon owned by the 
school provides transportation to recreational areas and for professional visits to allied in- 
stitutions and agencies. 

TEACHING FACILITIES 

Amphitheaters, classrooms, and laboratories of the Faculty of Medicine are used for 
instruction by the Department of Nursing. A fully equipped nursing arts laboratory and 
a nutrition laboratory are located in Presbyterian Hospital. Extensive use is made of the 
audio-visual aid equipment available in the Department of Nursing. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The Tod Memorial Library is located in Anna C. Maxwell Hall. Latest editions of 
approved reference books are supplied from the Anna C. Maxwell Reference Library 
Fund. Supplementary library facilities in die various clinical specialties are available for 
student use. The Library of the School of Medicine, located in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, provides a large number of reference books and current periodicals. Stu- 
dents in the Department of Nursing use this library as their main source of reference. 

MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

The Medical Center Bookstore, located on the second floor of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, is maintained for the convenience of the students and staff of the Medical 
Center schools and hospitals. The store carries a full stock of textbooks and all other 
student supplies. The store is open on weekdays from 8:45 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 
8:45 a.m. to 1:30 P.M. 



PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

The Faculty reserves the right to make such changes in the program of instruction as 
experience may prove desirable. These changes may be made at any time deemed advisable. 



FIRST YEAR 
Winter Session 



Anatomy-Physiology 9 
Biochemistry J$ 
Microbiology 35 
Nutrition 25 
Pharmacology-Nursing 3 
Nursing 5 



Medicine-Surgery Clin- 
ical Nursing 1$ 



Anatomy and physiology, I 
Chemistry 
Microbiology, I 
Nutrition and cookery 
Pharmacology, I 
Introduction to nursing 

Nursing, I 

Mental health, I 

Professional adjustments, I 

Nursing in medicine and surgery, I 

Clinical instruction 
Orientation 
Physical education 



Hours of Wee\s of 
Instruction Concurrent 
Clinical 
Practice 

75 
45 
15 
45 
15 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



30 

3°t 

375 
30 



Spring Session 
Anatomy-Physiology 10 Anatomy and physiology, II 



Microbiology 36 
Nursing 16 



Medicine-Surgery Clin- 
ical Nursing 20 



Microbiology, II 

Nursing in medicine and surgery, II 

Medical and surgical nursing 

Diet therapy 

Mental health, II 

Nursing, II 

Pharmacology, II 

Nursing in medicine and surgery and 
diet service 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Vacadon 



30 
30 



240 
165 



* This figure comprises a total of 210 hours. 

f No academic credit. 

X Clinical practice includes 24 hours per week for 15 weeks in the Spring Session. 



25* 
4 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

SECOND YEAR 

From September 15 to December 15 



23 



Sociology-N ursin g 55 



Nursing 45 



Medicine-Surgery Clin- 
ical Nursing 2$ 



Hours of Wcehj of 
Instruction Concurrent 
Clinical 



Social foundations in nursing 
History of nursing 
Modern social problems 
Professional adjustments, II 

Nursing in medicine and surgery, II 
Concepts in medical and surgical 

specialties 
Nursing, III 
Nursing in emergencies 

Nursing in medicine and surgery, III 
Clinical instruction 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



Practice 



45 



45 



45 
90 
45 



16* 



BALANCE OF SECOND YEAR 



Hours of Weeks of 
Instruction Concurrent 









Clinical 








Practice 


Surgical Clinical 
Nursing 35 


Operating room technique (followed by 
recovery room, 2 weeks) 
Clinical instruction 


15 


8 


Obstetric Nursing 50 
Obstetric Clinical 


Obstetric nursing 


45 




Nursing 52 
Pediatric Nursing 60 
Pediatric Clinical 


Clinical instruction 
Pediatric nursing 


45 
45 


12 


Nursing 62 


Clinical instruction 


45 


12 


TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 


90 




TOTAL CLINICAL 


INSTRUCTION 


105 





Vacation 
* Clinical practice includes 24 hours per week for 6 weeks in the Winter Session. 



24 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
THIRD YEAR 



Sociology-Nursing g$ Trends in nursing 

Professional adjustments, III 

Psychiatric Nursing 6$ Psychiatric nursing 
Psychiatric Clinical 

Nursing 6y Clinical instruction 

'Neurologic Nursing yo Neurologic nursing 
Neurologic Clinical 

Nursing J2 Clinical instruction 

Orthopedic Nursing J2 Orthopedic nursing 
Orthopedic Clinical 

. Nursing 74 Clinical instruction 

Public Health Nursing 80 Outpatient nursing (including out- 
patient nursing service) 

Clinical instruction 
Nursing in medicine and surgery, IV 

Clinical instruction 

90A Gynecology 

90B Urology 

90C Ophthalmology and otolaryn- 
gology 

90D Medicine and surgery including 



Hours of 


Weehj of 


Instruction 


Concurrent 




Clinical 




Practice 


30 




105 




45 


12 


30 




15 


8 


30 




15 





Medicine-Surgery go 



30 



electives 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Vacation 



15 
J 5 

15 

30 

165 
165 



SUMMARY OF INSTRUCTION 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



Academic 




Credit 


Total Hours 


52 


1,005* 


10 


510 



This figure includes 45 hours which bear no academic credit. 




ENTRANCE TO ANNA C. MAXWELL HALL 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Orientation. 15 hours (no academic credit). Professors Deleuran and Lee and Misses 

Lynch, Rathbun, Vanderbilt, and others. 

Orientation is designed to acquaint the student with the academic program of the Winter Session and 
the facilities of the school, the residence, and the community. Techniques of study, the positive health 
program, recreational opportunities, and social and cultural resources offered in New York City are dis- 
cussed. Excursions are scheduled to places of general interest. The program is carefully developed in co- 
operation with the Student Government Association; its members assume an active role in introducing 
the new student to community and professional living. 

Anatomy-Physiology 9 — Anatomy and physiology, I. 75 hours. 3 points. Members of the 

Departments of Anatomy and Physiology, Professor Deleuran, and Misses Gill and 

Rathbun. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems of the 
human body with their component tissues, illustrated with gross and microscopic specimens. Correlation 
with the theory and practice of nursing is made through lecture, laboratory demonstration, and group 
discussion. 

Biochemistry 75 — Chemistry. 45 hours. 2 points. Dr. Behre and Miss Gill. 

A course in chemistry correlating with physiology, microbiology, nutrition, and pharmacology. It in- 
cludes the use of the metric and apothecaries' systems to give the student a working knowledge of 
measuring and computing drug dosages and the preparation of solutions. Emphasis is placed on physiologi- 
cal chemistry as it applies to normal functioning of the body and to pathological conditions. 

Microbiology 35 — Microbiology, I. 15 hours. 1 point (credit to be completed in the 
Spring Session). Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course stressing the importance of microbiology in nursing and in medicine, immunology, 
and sterilization. Some practice in bacteriological techniques will be given. This course will be followed 
in the Spring Session by Microbiology 36. 

Nutrition 25 — Nutrition and cookery. 45 hours. 2 points. Miss Tanner. 

Nutrition: A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Foods arc 
classified as to their composition and nutritive value. Each food constituent is studied and traced through 
the physiological processes of digestion and metabolism. Emphasis is placed upon the standards for a 
normal diet and the effects of a deficient and abundant supply of the food essentials. 

Cookery: The methods of preparation of simple foods and their use in diets for the sick. In the prepara- 
tion of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. The lessons are 
planned with the meal as a basis, i.e., several foods suitable for a breakfast are prepared in one lesson and 
are served on a tray. Special consideration is given to size of servings, temperature of the food, general 
arrangement, and attractiveness of the tray. In planning the meals the economic factor is stressed and 
low-cost meals are prepared. 

Pharmacology-Nursing 3 — Pharmacology, I. 15 hours. 1 point. Miss Gill. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles of drug administration, 
pharmaceutic preparations in common use, types of drug action, legislation concerning drug administra- 
tion, and the fundamental knowledge necessary for the study of advanced pharmacology. 

Nursing 5 — Introduction to nursing. 180 hours. 9 points. Professors Lee and Pettit, Dr. 
Ecker and others, and Misses J. C. Brown, Hamon, Lynch, Moore, Rathbun, and Reilly. 

An introduction to the basic principles of nursing with emphasis on physical and emotional health 
as factors in balanced, satisfying living; the interaction of the community and the individual as related 
to health; the significance of illness to the individual, his family, and the community; the interrelation- 
ships of members of the health team in meeting the needs of the patient and his family; the meaning of 
the profession and the responsibilities entailed. Through demonstrations and clinical and classroom prac- 
tice, techniques related to personal hygiene and simple therapeutic procedures are considered in terms of 
their contribution to total patient care'. 



26 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 15 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, I. Clinical 
instruction. 30 hours. Professor Pettit and Misses Barrows, J. C. Brown, Guinter, Hoynak, 
Moore, Reilly, and Smith. 

Supervised practice in the care of mildly ill or convalescent patients averages eight hours per week, sup- 
plemented by two hours of planned clinical teaching. Group discussions are planned to aid the student to 
meet the nursing needs of her various patients and the problems in her own professional growth. 

Physical Education. 30 hours (no academic credit). Miss Rathbun. 

A fundamental course in body mechanics, swimming, folk and square dancing, and hiking — offered to 
increase posture consciousness, relaxation techniques, and recreational interests of the student. Classes are 
scheduled through the Winter Session. Thereafter students are expected to participate two hours per 
week in one or more sports. 

SPRING SESSION 
Nursing 16 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, II. 180 hours. 12 points. 

This area of the curriculum has been developed to provide the student with the opportunity to acquire 
knowledge and understanding of the principles of nursing and related sciences in the area of general 
medicine and surgery. An effort is made to correlate instruction by means of closely related clinical 
experience including a planned teaching program. The following units are considered: 

Medical Nursing. 30 hours. 2 points. Dr. Cosgriff and Miss J. C. Brown. 

This unit discusses the fundamentals of medical conditions — their causes, treatment, and implications 
for the patient. 

Surgical Nursing. 30 hours. 2 points. Dr. Ferrer and Miss Moore. 

This unit discusses the nature, cause, symptoms, and treatment of major surgical conditions. 

Mental Health, II. 15 hours. 1 point. Dr. Ecker and Miss Lynch. 

A brief survey is made through lectures and discussions of the principles underlying human behavior, 
directed toward giving the student an understanding of the basic emotional needs and commonly en- 
countered defense mechanisms of the individual. 

Pharmacology, II. 30 hours. 2 points. Dr. Plimpton and Miss Gill. 

This unit is a continuation of Pharmacology-Nursing 3 and considers drugs from the point of view 
of their therapeutic action and use. Clinical application is provided by twenty hours of planned instruction 
in small groups. Experience in the administration of drugs is gained through the concurrent supervised 
practice. 

Diet Therapy. 15 hours. 1 point. Miss Tanner. 

A unit designed to give the student an understanding of the modification of the normal diet in the 
treatment of disease. Consideration is given to social, psychological, and economic factors which affect 
food habits; emphasis is placed on meeting individual needs. 

Nursing, II. 60 hours. 4 points. Professors Deleuran and Pettit, Misses J. C. Brown, Gill, 
Lynch, Moore, Reilly, and others. 

The content of this unit centers around the care of the medical and surgical patient with emphasis 
on areas of special significance to nursing. Through close correlation between clinical and classroom dis- 
cussions and assignments, the major nursing needs of the patient are considered. 

Anatomy-Physiology 10 — Anatomy and physiology, II. 30 hours. 1 point. Professors 
Baker, Knowlton, McAllister, and Sciarra, Drs. Chace and Ferrer, and Miss Gill. 

This unit of lectures and demonstration is a continuation of Anatomy-Physiology 9. It emphasizes normal 
physiology and compares it with the physiological changes in medical and surgical conditions. 

Microbiology 36 — Microbiology, II. 30 hours. 1 point. Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

A continuation of Microbiology 35, considering specific pathogenic bacteria as the causative agents of 
disease. Attention is given to ways in which the nurse, knowing the characteristics of these organisms, may 
aid in the prevention of disease and its transmission. A study of some of the common communicable dis- 
eases is included. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 27 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 20 — Nursing in medicine and surgery. Clinical in- 
struction. 165 hours. Professors Cleveland and Pettit and Misses Barrows, J. C. Brown, 
Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, and Smith. 

Clinical assignments during this period are to the general medical and surgical units, where the student 
obtains supervised experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

Clinical conferences total approximately two and a half hours per week. The teaching is patient- 
centered and is developed to assist the student to apply her knowledge and skill in nursing situations. 
Doctors, student and graduate nurses, social workers, nutritionists, and others who contribute to total 
patient care assist in this invaluable area of experience. Studies of the nursing needs of particular 
patients are made by the students and presented orally or in writing. During class blocks the clinical 
conferences are correlated with the subject matter being discussed in class and at all times conferences 
are based on the needs of the patient and on the best means of meeting those needs. 

Another phase of the experience in medical and surgical units includes instruction and practice in the 
administration of medicines and the techniques of surgical dressings. 

The student's understanding of the nutritional needs of the medical and surgical patient is developed 
by two weeks' experience in the Diet Service of each of these units. 

Experience in the care of patients throughout the twenty-four hours is provided by a two-week period 
of evening duty followed by a two-week period of night duty. 



SECOND YEAR 

FROM SEPTEMBER 15 TO DECEMBER 15 

Nursing 45 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, II. 45 hours. 2 points. Professors Deleuran 
and Pettit, Misses Lynch and Reilly, and members of the staff of Medical and Surgical 
Specialties. 

Concepts in Medical and Surgical Specialties 

A unit concerned with basic concepts common to medical and surgical specialties in the areas of 
ophthalmology, otolaryngology, urology, and gynecology. 

Nursing, III 

A course concerned primarily with a problem-solving approach to teaching patients and their families; 
improvisation of equipment is included. Basic principles of teaching, learning, and methodology are intro- 
duced. Group presentation of teaching in various nurse-patient-family situations constitute the major part 
of the course. 

Nursing in Emergencies 

A review of the basic knowledge essential to the intelligent management of emergency situations as they 
may arise in daily life. Nursing in atomic disaster is emphasized. 

Sociology-Nursing 55 — Social foundations in nursing. 45 hours. 2 points. Professor Lee 
and Misses Hamon, Lynch, Sessoms, and others. 

Modern Social Problems 

This unit attempts an evaluation of the social and financial strains of illness for the patient, his family, 
and the community. There is discussion of ways in which community resources are developed to reduce 
suffering and the recurrence of illness and rehabilitation of patients is effected. 

History of Nursing 

A study of the history of nursing to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of nursing traditions 
and ideals, the development of nursing, and the leaders who advanced the profession to its present high 
standards. 

Professional Adjustments, II 

A unit developed around special problems such as the legal status of the nurse, her role in meeting the 
religious needs of her patients, and other related problems. The course is organized to provide discussion 
in small groups with consultants in legal, religious, and other fields. 



28 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 25 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, HI. Clinical 

instruction. 45 hours. Professors Cleveland and Pettit and Misses Barrows, J. C. Brown, 

Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, and Smith. 

This experience is offered concurrently with and following the Winter Session block of classes. Al- 
though the student has previously gained an appreciation of the social and teaching needs of patients, 
particular emphasis is placed on these two areas at this time. Patients who present medical and surgical 
situations that are common to these specialties, in their broadest sense, such as rehabilitation and long- 
term care, are cared for by the students and are presented for group discussion by them. 

BALANCE OF SECOND YEAR 

Surgical Clinical Nursing 35 — Operating room technique (followed by recovery room, 2 
weeks). 15 hours. 6 weeks. Mrs. Mellor and members of the operating room team. 

Through conferences, discussions, demonstrations, and supervised practice the student is given an op- 
portunity to recognize the major nursing needs of the patient during the operative period. Emphasis is 
placed on the psychological needs of the patient immediately preceding operation. Application of the 
principles of aseptic technique in operating room practice is an important part of this experience. 

Recovery room experience (two weeks), affords the student an opportunity to develop further her 
observational and technical skills in giving care to patients immediately following surgery. Conferences 
related to particular problems associated with various anesthetic agents, physical states that may complicate 
this period, new drugs and blood substitutes, etc., are conducted by the head nurse, anesthetists, surgeons, 
and others. 

Obstetric Nursing 50 and Obstetric Clinical Nursing 52 — Obstetric nursing and clinical 
instruction. 90 hours. 3 points. 12 weeks. Professor Allanach, Misses Cameron and Hogan 
and members of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

This course piovides the opportunity to acquire the special knowledge and skills necessary to provide 
safe nursing care to the mother and infant throughout the entire maternal cycle; to develop an under- 
standing of the psychological, social, and economic implications of obstetrics and their influence on the 
family and community; to develop an appreciation of the responsibility of the nurse in teaching the 
health principles related to the childbearing aspects of family life. 

Newer obstetric trends are presented, including principles and practice in relaxation exercises preparatory 
to labor. 

Concurrent supervised experience in the application of the basic principles is provided in nurseries, labor 
and delivery rooms, outpatient department, and with obstetric patients in both the antepartum and post- 
partum periods. Conferences and nursing care studies provide additional means for determining values 
derived from observation and application of total patient care. 

Instruction is given by obstetricians, pediatricians, dietitians, and nursing staff. 

Pediatric Nursing 60 and Pediatric Clinical Nursing 62 — Pediatric nursing and clinical 
instruction. 45 hours. 3 points. 12 weeks. Professor Peto, Misses Bullick, Farrell, and 
Kent, and members of the Department of Pediatrics. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of the physical and emotional develop- 
ment of childhood and to familiarize her with the technique for the nursing of sick children. The students 
receive instruction in the classroom and at the bedside in addition to supervised practice on the wards 
and in the outpatient department. 

Instruction in the various phases of nursing of children is given by pediatricians, nurse instructors, and 
dietitians. 

The course is parallel to the clinical experience on the pediatric service, covering a twelve-week period. 

THIRD YEAR 

Sociology-Nursing 95 — Trends in nursing. 30 hours. Professors Deleuran, Lee, and 
Mutch, Miss Lynch, and special lecturers. 

Professional Adjustments, III 

This course prepares the student to assume responsibility as a registered professional nurse and to take 
her place as a leader in community activities. Careers in professional nursing are studied by student 
groups according to the students' particular interests. Group development techniques are used to explore 
the various areas aided by consultants in public health, Government Nursing Services, and the major clini- 
cal areas of nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 29 

Psychiatric Nursing 65 and Psychiatric Clinical Nursing 67 — Psychiatric nursing and 
clinical instruction. 150 hours. 3 points. 12 weeks. Professors Horwitz and Polatin, Miss 
Morgan, and members of the Department of Psychiatry and the New York State 
Psychiatric Institute. 

The aim of this course is to give the student an understanding of the known causes, prevention, treat- 
ment, and nursing care of psychiatric disorders. At the same time the aspects of psychiatry which are 
embodied in all professional and social situations are included so as to aid the student in a broad 
integration and personal maturity. 

Theory and practice in the total care of the patient includes consideration of the role of other dis- 
ciplines and the application of the principles of dynamic psychiatry. An orientation to the better- 
known schools of thought is given. 

Teaching methods include oral and written reports, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, field trips, 
role playing, films, observation techniques, and individual and staff conferences. Clinical correlation is 
emphasized. 

Neurologic Nursing 70 and Neurologic Clinical Nursing 72 — Neurologic nursing and 

clinical instruction. 45 hours. 2 points. 8 weeks. Professor Covell, Mrs. Delabarre, and 

members of the Department of Neurology. 

This course in basic neurologic nursing has its major focus on the problems of adjustment of the 
neurologic patient, including quadriplegia, paraplegia, hemiplegia, dysphasia, seizures, and deviations 
from normal behavior associated with lesions of the brain. Also emphasized are the effect of various disease 
processes on these major areas of dysfunction of the nervous system and aid offered by organized society. 
Patient-centered teaching is stressed with use of cardex plans of care, nursing conferences, and films that 
develop the team approach to the neurologic patient. 

Orthopedic Nursing 72 and Orthopedic Clinical Nursing 74 — Orthopedic nursing and 
clinical instruction. 45 hours. 2 points. 8 weeks. Professor Wilde, Miss Maclntire, and 
members of the Orthopedic Department. 

This course is given concurrently with the student clinical experience on the orthopedic service. Lectures, 
discussions, clinics, and special observations are arranged to give the student a concept of the total care 
of patients with orthopedic conditions, including rehabilitation. Special emphasis is placed on the concept 
of long-term care and the psychological factors involved. The importance of the early recognition and 
prevention of deformities is stressed. The student is given an opportunity to assist in the care of the 
patient in the hospital and in the outpatient department and to follow selected patients during their care 
at the Institute for the Crippled and Disabled. Instruction is also given by occupational and physical 
therapists. 

Public Health Nursing 80 — Outpatient nursing (including outpatient nursing service). 

30 hours. 2 points. 8 weeks. Misses Hamon and Kennedy. 

A special program of instruction in the outpatient department is given each student during her eight 
weeks. The aims of this experience are to provide for the student nursing experience with patients before 
and after hospitalization, to develop further the student's teaching skills, and to increase the student's 
knowledge of community health and social organizations. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned 
to a full-time public health instructor. Field trips are arranged to various health and social agencies, both 
official and nonofficial. 

Two weeks of instruction, observation, and experience in home nursing are a part of every student's 
schedule in connection with her outpatient department service. The chief objective of this particular ex- 
perience is to demonstrate continuity of patient care. The field experience is under the guidance of a full- 
time public health field instructor. During this period attention is focused on the preventive, educational, 
and social aspects of family health service. The function of the public health nurse is interpreted both in 
action and in conference. 

Medicine-Surgery 90 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, rv. Clinical instruction. 75 
hours. 3 points. 

goA — Gynecology: Nursing in. 15 hours. 4 weeks. Professor Allanach, Miss Cameron, 

and members of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Lectures, discussions, oral reports, and planned observations (anteoperative clinic, clinic follow-up, 
etc.) during this period provide an opportunity for the student to gain an appreciation of the nurse's role 
in the care of the patient with gynecological conditions. Assisting with the planning and conducting of 
predischarge classes for patients affords the student valuable experience in this type of teaching. 



3 o COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

goB — Urology: Nursing in. 15 hours. 4 weeks. Professor Cleveland, Miss Trebilcock, 
and members of the Department of Urology. 

This unit is arranged to show the modification of the nursing of medical and surgical patients as they 
relate to urology conditions. Special needs of the geriatric patient and the patient with congenital anomalies 
are stressed. There is opportunity for experience in specialized procedures, treatments, and dressing tech- 
niques necessary for the care of the urological patient. Patient and family teaching in relation to the post- 
hospital care of these patients is emphasized. Nursing problems encountered by the students are pre- 
sented by them for group discussion. 

goC — Ophthalmology: Nursing in. 8 hours. 2 weeks. Miss Wright and members of 

the Department of Ophthalmology. 

A series of discussions, lectures, and planned observations developed to indicate the major nursing 
needs of patients with eye pathology. Special emphasis is given to emotional factors associated with 
disease in vision or blindness. An inspection of the facilities of rehabilitation and experience in the 
use of some of them are provided. The instruction includes a brief review and consideration of the pre- 
ventive aspects of eye care that were presented earlier. Concurrent with this teaching students receive two 
weeks of clinical experience in the care of patients with ophthalmological conditions. 

goC — Otolaryngology: Nursing in. 7 hours. 2 weeks. Miss Hagner and members of 
the Department of Otolaryngology. 

Planned instruction and clinical experience are offered concurrently during this period. Conferences, 
clinics, discussions, and special periods of observation are arranged to give the student a broad view of 
the aims of otolaryngology as they relate to hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients. Preoperative, 
operative, and postoperative care of patients undergoing endoscopy are emphasized, and the student has 
experience in all phases of patient care. Special observations are planned to give the student an appreciation 
of the value of early detection of speech and hearing difficulties as well as an introduction to the facilities 
available to the deaf and to persons who have undergone laryngectomy. Psychological, sociological, and 
medical problems related to this area are stressed and the role of the nurse defined. 

goD — Nursing in medicine and surgery {including elective services). 30 hours. 10 
weeks. Professors Cleveland and Pettit and Misses Barrows, J. C. Brown, Guinter, 
Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, and Smith. 

This experience is provided on an advanced level and is developed according to the previous experience 
and current need of the individual student. Supervised experience is arranged to give the student an op- 
portunity to demonstrate her ability in giving quality nursing care to patients presenting major nursing 
problems. An introduction to the basic principles of management of the head nurse unit is planned for the 
student who is interested in this aspect of nursing. Special written and oral assignments are required. 

Special elective clinical experience is offered to a limited number of students at the Mary Harkness Con- 
valescent Home, one of the units of the Presbyterian Hospital; in rural community nursing at the Mary 
Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N.Y.; and in visiting nursing through the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York. 

Every effort is made to permit each student to have one or two elective services during the last six 
months in the school. These electives are scheduled in units of two or three months and may be in new 
clinical fields, in positions of junior administrative responsibility, or they may consist of advanced ex- 
perience in a previous service. 



^ 



-*% 



f .. 

*■■■ 



Xf' 





ORIGINAL TABLET FROM OLD PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL NOW PLACED 
AT ENTRANCE TO VANDERBILT CLINIC AT THE MEDICAL CENTER 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
TOLLETIN OF INFORMATION 



I 



Fifty-third Series, No. 24 

•TACKS 



June 27, 1953 



$5V 



tUMBIAUNIVERS 



1 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 



)EPARTMENT OF NURSING 




OF THE 
FACULTY OF MEDICINE 
Abyterian HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 




MAN'SRIGHTTO 

KNOWLEDGE AND 

THE FREE USE 
THEREOF.*^ 






vzMS&e&em 



wmwmmi 



1754 — THE BICENTENNIAL YEAR — 1954 



OLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

63O WEST 168TH STREET • NEW YORK 32, N.Y. 



Columbia UmuerSitp bulletin of Snformatton 



Fifty-third Series, No. 24 



June 27, 1953 



Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N.Y., weekly from 
January for forty-six consecutive issues. Reentered as second-class matter August 15, 
1952, at the Post Office at New York, N.Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 
1917, authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to the Trustees and the Announcements 
of the several Colleges and Schools relating to the work of the next year. These are made 
as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon written 
application to the Office of University Admissions, 322 University Hall, Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York 27, N.Y. Copies may be obtained in person from the Office of the 
Secretary, 213 Low Memorial Library. 

C. U. P. 6,000 — 1953 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 



CONDENSED ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



The complete academic calendar for the year 1953-1954 may be obtained from the Office 
of the Secretary of the University. 

1953 

September 8 Tuesday. Orientation program for the Class of 1956. 
September 9 Wednesday. Registration. Class of 1956. 

September 10 Thursday. Registration (including the payment of fees) for students in 
the classes of 1954 and 1955. 

Winter Session begins for the Class of 1956, First Year. 

Tuesday. Winter Session begins for the Class of 1955, Second Year. 

Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday. 

Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 



September 15 
November 3 
November 26 



December 23 Wednesday. Vacation for the Class of 1956.* 



1954 

January 5 Tuesday. Completion of course for Group A students of the Class of 1954. 

February 1 Monday. Spring Session begins for the Class of 1956, First Year. 

February 22 Monday. Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

May 30 Sunday. Memorial Day. Holiday. 

Baccalaureate Service for the Class of 1954. 

June 1 Tuesday. Conferring of degrees on students of the Class of 1953 and 

Group A students of the Class of 1954. Ceremony at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

June 3 Thursday. Conferring of diplomas on the Class of 1954. Ceremony at 

Presbyterian Hospital. 

July 4 Sunday. Independence Day. Holiday. 

September 5 Sunday. Completion of course for Group B and Group C students of the 
Class 1954. 

September 6 Monday. Labor Day. Holiday. 

* In the first year of the course, one week of vacation is arranged during the Christmas holiday period. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Grayson Kirk, Ph.D., LL.D President oj the University 

John A. Krout, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D. . . . Vice President and Provost of the University 
Willard Cole Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Med.Sc.D. . Vice President in Charge oj 

Medical A fairs; Dean oj the Faculty oj Medicine 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, Ph.D Associate Dean and Secretary 

James E. McCormack, A.B., M.D Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) 

Harold W. Brown, M.D., D.P.H Associate Dean (Public Health) 

Maurice J. Hickey, D.M.D., M.D Associate Dean (Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Eleanor Lee, A.B., R.N Assistant Professor oj Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department oj Nursing 



THE FACULTY 



J. Burns Amberson 
Dana W. Atchley 
E. Dwight Barnett 
Frank B. Berry 
James Bordley III 
Harold W. Brown 
Charles L. Buxton 
George F. Cahill 
E. Gurney Clark 
Hans T. Clarke 
Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
Robert C. Darling 
Richard L. Day 
D. Anthony D'Esopo 
Samuel R Detwiler 
John H. Dunnington 
Earl T. Engle 
John W. Fertig 
Thomas P. Fleming 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 
Virginia K. Frantz 
Alfred Gilman 
Ross Golden 
Magnus I. Gregersen 
Alexander B. Gutman 

CUSHMAN D. HAAGENSEN 

Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Horace L. Hodes 
Houghton Holliday 
George H. Humphreys II 
Yale Kneeland, Jr. 
Barnet M. Levy 



Nolan D. C. Lewis 
Robert F. Loeb 
James E. McCormack 
Rustin McIntosh 
Monroe A. McIver 
Irville H. MacKinnon 
Rollo J. Masselink 
H. Houston Merritt 
Frederick A. Mettler 
Edgar G. Miller, Jr. 
Carl T. Nelson 
John L. Nickerson 
Emanuel M. Papper 
George A. Perera 
J. Lawrence Pool 
Willard C. Rappleye 
Dickinson W. Richards, Jr. 
Walter S. Root 
Harry M. Rose 
Rudolph N. Schullinger 
Beatrice C. Seegal 
David Seegal 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 
Lawrence W. Sloan 
Alan DeForest Smith 
Gilbert P. Smith 
Harry P. Smith 
Lewis R. Stowe 
Howard C. Taylor 
Kenneth B. Turner 
Harry B. van Dyke 
Carmine T. Vicale 
Theodore J. C. von Storch 
Jerome P. Webster 
Abner Wolf 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 3 

NURSING EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

E. Lee, Chairman, H. W. Brown, S. R. Detwiler, G. H. Humphreys II, N. D. C. Lewis, 
R. F. Loeb, R. McIntosh, E. G. Miller, Jr., }. M. A. Mutch, M. Peto, H. F. Pettit, H. 
C. Taylor, the Dean, ex officio 

ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE 

E. Lee, Chairman, J. C. Brown, R. A. Lynch, E. Rathbun, F. L. Vanderbilt, the Dean, 
ex officio 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor oj Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department oj Nursing 
A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

Mary E. Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Harriet M. Deleuran, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, 195 1; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen F. Peitit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1936 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N , Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 



Frances H. Barrows, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, r943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Josephine C. Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Duke, 1942; B.S., Columbia, 1945; A.M., 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1945 

Beth L. Cameron, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 

Helen C. Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; A.M.. 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Angela J. Del Vecchio, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 1944; B.S., Chicago, 1945 

Bernice R. Derby Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Lucille M. Dewey Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Syracuse, 1947; A.M., Columbia, 1953; Graduate, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 1947 






DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Beatrice M. Dorbacker Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1950 

Dolores C. Farrell, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1952; Graduate, Cochran School of Nursing, 1947 

Alice K. Faulkner Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Cornell, 1946 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 

Ruth M. Guinter, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Margaret A. Hogan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Graduate, Cooley Dickinson School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., Columbia, 1943; A.M., 1946 

Rose M. Hoynak, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Ruth A. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932; A.M., New York University, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; 
Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Margaret E. MacIntire, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 

Lucille D. Manning, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York State College for Teachers, 1935; B.S., Columbia, 1949; Graduate, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1949 

Josephine E. Mellor, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 195 1; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939 

Susan B. Moore, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., American University, 1939; B.S., Columbia, 1944; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1943 

Edith E. Morgan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; A.M., 1951; Graduate, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 1929 

Dorothy E. Reilly, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; M.S., Boston, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Ellen G. Smith, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1946; A.M., New York University, 1953; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1946 

Marjorie H. Stewart, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1944; B.S., Columbia, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1950 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Yvonne A. Tkebilcock, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1948 

Elizabeth L. Watling Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1947; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1947 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 



Eula W. Rathbun Recreational Director 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925; A.M., Columbia, 1946 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

BASIC SCIENCES 

Anatomy and Physiology 
Members of the Departments of Anatomy and Physiology 

Chemistry 
Jeannette A, Behre, Ph.D Associate in Biochemistry 

Microbiology 
Margaret Holden, Ph.D Associate in Microbiology 

MODERN SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

Elizabeth Sessoms, A.M Assistant Director, Social Service 

Department, Presbyterian Hospital 

NURSING IN MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

Henry Aranow, Jr., M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Robert R. Chace, M.D., Med.Sc.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Stuart W. Cosgriff, M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Leonard Crowley, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Jose M. Ferrer, Jr., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Charles W. Frank, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Saul B. Gusberg, M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 

Abbie I. Knowlton, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John K. Lattimer, M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Urology 

Calvin H. Plimpton, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Daniel Sciarra, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING y 

NURSING IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

Byron C. Butler, M.D., Med.ScD Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Arnold N. Fenton, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ruth C. Harris, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

David B. Moore, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Equinn W. Munnell, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Charles M. Steer, M.D., Med.ScD Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 
Susan W. Williamson, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

NURSING IN PEDIATRCS 

Saul Blatman, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Douglas S. Damrosch, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Stanley L. Lane, M.D Instructor in Oral Surgery 

NURSING IN NEUROLOGY 

Fritz J. Cramer, M.D Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurological Surgery 

H. Houston Merritt, M.D Professor of Neurology 

J. Lawrence Pool, M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

NURSING IN ORTHOPEDICS 

Alan de Forert Smith, M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Harrison L. McLaughlin, M.D Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery 

NURSING IN PSYCHIATRY 

(including Mental Health) 

John E. McGowan, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

William A. Horwitz, M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 

Phillip Polatin, M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

NURSING COMMITTEE 

W. E. S. Gr is wold, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice Chairman 
Miss Marie C. Byron Mrs. Grover O'Neill 

Mrs. Benjamin Coates Mrs. Stephen H. Philbin 

John H. Dunnington, M.D. Willard C. Rappleye, M.D. 

Miss Margaret Eliot Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 

George H. Humphreys II, M.D. Mrs. Byron Stookey 

Miss Eleanor Lee Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 

Robert F. Loeb, M.D. Howard C. Taylor, Jr., M.D. 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 

H. Houston Merritt, M.D. Mrs. Staunton Williams 

John S. Parke, ex officio 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Acting Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 

Florence C. Earends, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

A. Beatrice Langmuir, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1925 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1929 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Phyllis M. Young, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 



Lillian A. Oring, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Personnel 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1947 




H ! 



t 




S&' «\VV 



HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is one of the large, modern medical 
centers of die East. The specialized hospitals of die Medical Center have histories and 
enviable professional reputadons dating back many years prior to dieir merger to form 
the Medical Center. The Presbyterian Hospital is tradidonally progressive because of the 
constant study for improved methods of health care. This progressive atdtude began 
with the founding of Presbyterian Hospital in 1868 and has continued through the years, 
as has its original aim of "affording medical and surgical aid and nursing care to sick or 
disabled persons of every creed, nadonality, and color." The clinical facilides and oppor- 
tunides for learning are vast. 

The School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital was founded in 1892 by the Board 
of Managers. Miss Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., A.M., the first Director of the School, es- 
tablished die plans for administration and instruction and guided them for thirty years. 
Her contribudon has a lasdng effect upon the growth of the profession to its present 
dignity and importance. Over three diousand nurses have been graduated since the open- 
ing of the school. 

The Hospital's interest in teaching was furdier demonstrated by affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia 
University. This led to a permanent affiliation between the two institutions in 1921. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center at 168th Street, overlooking the Hudson 
River, was opened in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness and her 
son, Edward S. Harkness; both were generous contributors to the project. The Medical 
Center has condnued to expand according to the needs of the community, medical re- 
search, and education. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, and in 1937 
the University established the Department of Nursing of the Faculty of Medicine. This 
affiliation marked another step in the integration of the University and the hospitals at 
the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. The Department of Nursing is approved by 
the National Nursing Accrediting Service and holds agency membership in the new 
National League for Nursing. 

AIMS 

For both the degree and the diploma students, the aim of the basic professional 
nursing program is to prepare qualified young women to practice nursing effecdvely in 
hospitals, homes, and in the various types of health agencies. Nursing is interpreted as 
including health promotion through education, care of the sick and injured, and their 
restoration to a useful place in society. 

The degree program, in addition to the above, is so planned that students in this group 
have the opportunity to utilize and further develop the greater maturity and educadonal 
experience which they bring to the situation. The wide and varied experiences of this 
program are directed toward challenging the students' knowledge and skills, tangible 
and intangible. 

Throughout her nursing education, the student is encouraged and provided the 
opportunity to become aware of the social and health needs of individuals and the com- 
munity, their effect upon the trends in national thinking, as well as the present and 
possible contribution of nursing to human welfare. 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Opportunity is provided for the continued development of the student physically, 
mentally, emotionally, and culturally with emphasis on her interests, needs, and responsi- 
bilities as a person, a member of the nursing profession, and as a citizen. 

The student is introduced to the various opportunities in nursing and is helped to 
select for further study and experience that field of nursing in which she will find her 
greatest satisfaction and to which she can make her opdmum contribution. 



THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The young woman today finds a bewildering number of possibilides open to her as she 
considers her future. 

The spotlight of public opinion is strongly focused on nursing as the need for the 
services of skilled, intelligent professional nurses continues. Estimates of the probable 
number required for the maintenance of health services throughout the nation, in Army, 
Navy, civilian, and veterans hospitals and in urban and rural communities, call for many 
more professional nurses than are available at present. This demand is increased by the 
broadening concepts of world leadership that our country is being asked to assume. 

A professional education in nursing affords a broad understanding of health needs as 
they relate to individuals and groups, as well as an appreciadon of the role of the nursing 
profession. This preparation is personally valuable to the nurse and also enables her to 
make major contributions to planning, which is related to nursing and health care in a 
great variety of situations. Graduate nurses have proven themselves to be valuable mem- 
bers of governing boards of many organizations in communities all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly. 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical defect 
is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to mention may 
be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements are outlined on page 12. The School will welcome an oppor- 
tunity to guide its candidates well in advance of the date of entrance. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a hospital before en- 
tering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities for trying out practical "work- 
samples" of nursing and securing some contact with patients, even at an elementary 
level. Such a procedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for 
nursing and the seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 



CAREERS IN NURSING 

The program in nursing at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center offers excellent 
preparation for the countless opportunities which are open to registered professional 
nurses in different fields. 

In the institutional field a major challenge is offered to nurses who are able to give 
expert bedside care. Nurses with particular interest and ability in guiding others in 
giving patient care will find opportunities to fill positions of "team leaders." With ad- 
ditional experience and preparation head nurse, supervisory, and teaching positions are 
open to those who qualify. There are many opportunities for those who wish to specialize 
in various clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, psychiatry, or 
orthopedics. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING u 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes visiting nursing, school and industrial 
nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

There are opportunities for important service and influence in a number of government 
services — the Veterans Administration, the Public Health Service, and the Army and the 
Navy Nurse Corps. 

Many universities, such as Columbia, give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing 
to prepare themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, 
or in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in the hospital, the home, the industrial plant, or 
the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility and honor. 
She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the 
industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with governmental and voluntary 
relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the community. American nurses 
have a large share of responsibility in restoring health and welfare services in many 
parts of the world. The opportunities for service increase rather than diminish, both at 
home and abroad. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSES 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and must 
present a record of good health. All candidates are required to make formal application 
in writing on blanks supplied by die school. It is desirable to make application at least one 
year in advance of the date of desired entrance. After the application has been submitted, 
the academic record of the candidate will be secured by the Department of Nursing from 
the college or high school attended. Students entering from high school should present 
a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their school, together 
with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such specific requirement is 
made for college students, preference is always given to those who have shown evidence 
of ability and achievement. 

The Department of Nursing submits all educational credentials for final approval 
to the Director of University Admissions of Columbia University. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for physical 
examination by the school physician will be made by the Department of Nursing, probably 
within six months of the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time of 
admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, therefore, 
come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

Application blanks and any further information about the course in nursing may be 
secured from the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University, 630 
West 1 68th Street, New York 32, N. Y. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of Columbia 
University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered as University 
students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences; theory and practice of 
nursing techniques; clinical experience in medical, surgical, obstetric, pediatric, and 
psychiatric nursing; nutrition; and various specialties and electives in the Presbvterian 
Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic course 
is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college education 
are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the classroom and on 
the wards. 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University. (See below.) 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic courses under one of the following classifications: 

Group A — Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 13 

and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 
students are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for 
the diploma. 

Group B — Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a 
college approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Department 
may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in three years. Such students 
are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. 
The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on this basis should include: 

Points 

Requirements: Biology, chemistry, 1 or physics 8 

English 6 

Psychology 6 

Sociology 6 26 

Elecdves: Language, history, mathematics, economics, philosophy or 

religion, 2 fine arts or supplementary courses in the required 
fields 34 

No credit will be granted for commercial, home economics, physical education, 
or vocational courses. No credit will be granted for any one-point course. 

This program is frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or 
university elsewhere and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C — Students who have completed a part of a college course but do not meet 
the requirements outlined under A and B, may register for the three-year basic course, 
receiving the diploma in nursing upon completion. Preference is given to candidates with 
some college preparation previous to entrance. The opportunity to register for the three- 
year basic course is also offered to a selected number of well-prepared students who hold 
a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to Columbia University and to the 
New York State Education Department, and who show evidence of satisfactory academic 
preparation in sixteen units of subject matter. Students entering on this basis must meet 
the requirements as prescribed by the New York State Education Department and the 
requirements for entrance to the School of Nursing as follows: 

English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry and either biology or general science) ; 
mathematics, 1 unit (algebra or geometry); history or social studies, 2 units; 
electives, 7 units in 2- or 3-unit sequences in languages or the above required sub- 
jects. A total of 16 units is required, and the University allows no credit for com- 
mercial or home economics courses. 

Special programs offered by Columbia and other universities enable a student to obtain 
a B.S. degree in a reasonable length of time following graduation. The number of credits 
needed is determined individually. 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study be approved by the 
University before final selections are made. Applicants should therefore communicate 
with the Department of Nursing two years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

1 Chemistry is required if it lias not been taken in high school. 

2 A maximum of six credits may be allowed for courses in religion or speech. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank giving such 
information as may be required. Registration takes place in Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort 
Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on the second Thursday in September. 

FEES 

The application fee of $10 is payable with the application. It covers the cost of assembling 
credentials and of die physical examination and aptitude tests, the results of which 
determine the candidate's eligibility. This fee is not returnable regardless of the action 
taken on the application for admission. 

The University fee of $40 for the academic year or fraction thereof is payable each 
year on the day of registration in September. The application fee is credited on the 
University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay a 
tuition fee of $500 in two installments: $250 at the beginning of the first year and $250 
at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates for the 
diploma pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the beginning of the 
first year and $200 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the probable 
cost of the course in nursing (see page 12 for classification). The cost of the college study 
preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend entirely upon the 
institution attended. 

Group A 
Application $ 20 

First tuition 250 

Second tuition 250 

University fees 80 

Degree application 20 



All checks for tuition and University fees must be made payable to Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable amount 
of laundry without charge. In the first term of the first year the student provides her own 
uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $75 to the above totals. 
School uniforms are provided by the Hospital for the remainder of the nursing course. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Twenty-five dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations. 



SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $75 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and clinical practice is high, whose health is excellent, 
and who are making a contribution to the social life of the School. These scholarships 
are open to students after they have been in the School for six months. 



Group B 


Group C 


$ 20 


$ 20 


250 


200 


250 


200 


100 


100 


20 






1 




m 



THE COLUMBI 




EDICAL CENTER 




•* 






jmu 

jiff) f 



jUUMJL 



m. 




DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

University stipends or grants-in-aid are available to students in need of financial as- 
sistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted in amounts of $50. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship has been given in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President 
of the Presbyterian Hospital Board of Trustees. This scholarship covers the cost of tuition 
and University fees for a degree candidate during her three years in the School. 

Three new scholarship funds to aid students in the payment of their tuition were es- 
tablished in 1952: 

The Jane McAllister Scholarship Fund is to be used to help pay the tuition fee of a 
second year student in the Department of Nursing in need of financial assistance to com- 
plete her nursing course. 

The Margaret E. Conrad Scholarship Fund was established in June, 1952, tire income 
of which is to be awarded annually as a scholarship to an entering student in the degree 
program. 

The Mary Sencindiver Specht Scholarship Fund was established in August, 1952, the 
income of which, amounting to fifty dollars, is awarded to an entering student in the de- 
gree program. 

Special scholarships are granted from time to time by individuals or groups. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow reasonable amounts 
without interest at any time after the first term. 

Limited opportunity for employment is open to students with good academic, com- 
munity, and health records. Selected appointments for child care and clerical assistance 
in the Tod Memorial Library and general typing provide opportunity for earning money. 
It should be understood, however, that at best this earning can only supplement incidental 
expenses. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in writing to the 
Department of Nursing. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, offers 
to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work in the 
nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward a Master of 
Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may be accepted for the work for the 
Bachelor of Science degree provided they meet the special requirements of the Division. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master of Science 
degree, are offered by the Deparunent of Nursing to graduate nurses who hold accept- 
able bachelor's degrees and who have had satisfactory experience. 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing has two 
endowed funds for scholarships for advanced study in nursing. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a degree, 
certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of the 
University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as on the 
fulfillment of the academic requirements. 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student of the 
University during die session for which she is registered unless her connection with the 
University is officially severed by withdrawal or otiierwise. No student registered in any 
school or college of die University shall at the same time be registered in any odier 
school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other institution, without die 
specific authorization of the dean or director of the school or college of the University 
in which she is first registered. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves the right to refuse continuation in the Department 
of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the conditions 
of study in the Department 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by her of 
academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the granting of 
any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the University, which is 
free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it deems advisable. The 
disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the President in such cases as he 
deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the President, in the dean of each 
faculty and the director of the work of each administrative board. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic stand- 
ing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the University; but no 
student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entided to a discharge without the 
assent of her parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Executive Officer of the De- 
partment of Nursing. 

The Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing may, for reason of weight, grant 
a leave of absence to a student in good standing. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 per cent in each subject, according 
to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

A deficiency examination, for which there is a fee of $3.00, will be required of every 
student failing to receive a passing grade in any course. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from the 
School. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor of 
Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the prescribed 
course in the Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the Faculty of Medi- 
cine. 

Every student completing the course will receive the diploma in nursing from the 
Presbyterian Hospital, upon recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of the 
School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York, and, together 
with her state license to practice nursing (R.N.), it entitles her to membership in the 
American Nurses Association and other professional organizations. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSE (R.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of die State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held at intervals during the year under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Education of New York State. After passing these examinations the graduate 
nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse (R.N.) 

According to the law in New York State, only those persons who have filed intentions 
of becoming United States citizens may be admitted to the examinadons for license to 
practice as registered nurses. Candidates who are not citizens should discuss this question 
carefully before filing application papers for entrance to the School. 

COLUMBIA'S BICENTENNIAL 

In 1954 Columbia University is celebrating its 200th birthday. The theme of this 
Bicentennial Celebration is Man's Right to Knowledge and the Free Use Thereof, a 
theme that Columbia has exemplified in its colleges and schools for nearly 200 years and 
to which it will give continuing emphasis in the future. Three great convocations will 
be held in 1954. Preceding and following each of these convocations will be a conference 
bringing together members of the Columbia Faculties and other outstanding scholars to 
demonstrate, in the spirit and purpose of their discussions, the Bicentennial theme. The 
year 1954 holds promise for being one of the greatest, most important years in Columbia's 
long and distinguished history, and a year which will reiterate Columbia's unfailing faith 
in the future. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the residence of the School 
of Nursing. A modern building of fireproof construction overlooking the Hudson River, 
it is connected by underground passage with the other buildings of the Medical Center. 
Reception rooms, dining room, snack bar, library, and recreational facilities are located 
in this building. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort has 
been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence hall 
during the course of study. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Emphasis is placed on the importance of healthful living and the particular significance 
of diis to the nurse as a person and as a health teacher. Through individual and group 
conferences, as well as student committees of the Student Government Association, health 
practices and student activities are carefully considered. Every effort is made to maintain 
a positive approach to the individual's responsibility for her own well-being, both 
emotional and physical. 

The health of the student is closely supervised. Physical examinations are made at 
regularly scheduled periods and at other times, when necessary, by the school physician; 
laboratory investigations are made when indicated. Chest X-ray and tuberculin tests are 



i8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

done semiannually. Vaccinations with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) are advised for 
those students whose tuberculin tests are negative. The written consent of parents is re- 
quired before vaccination with BCG, as the procedure is optional. Students are under the 
care of the school physician or surgeon during their registration in the school. Widiin 
reasonable limits, the hospital assumes the cost of medical care of illness originating dur- 
ing the student period. The expenses of dental care and eye refraction must be borne by 
the student. 

VACATION 

Each student is allowed ten weeks of vacation divided as follows: one week at Christmas 
and three weeks in the summer during the first year; four weeks in the summer during 
the second year and two weeks in the third year. A student who enters with eight 
months' credit for her college degree is allowed six weeks of vacation: one week at 
Christmas and three weeks in the summer during the first year; two weeks during the 
last year. The dates on which vacations are given are arranged according to the student's 
program. 

In addition to vacations, every student has ten holidays a year. 

RELIGION 

The School is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may attend 
the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning devotions are held each 
day and all students reporting on duty are expected to attend. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The Student Handbook, published by the Student Government Association, contains a 
detailed account of the various student activities as well as the constitution and by-laws 
of the Association. Student Prints, written and edited by students, is published three 
times a year. Vital Signs is the student newspaper. 

The cocurricular program is under the guidance of the recreational director. Tennis 
courts in the hospital garden, swimming pool, gymnasium, and game room in Maxwell 
Hall offer opportunity for recreation. A station wagan owned by the school provides 
transportation for recreational and educational trips. 

TEACHING FACILITIES 

Amphitheaters, classrooms, and laboratories of the Faculty of Medicine are used for 
instruction by the Department of Nursing. A fully equipped nursing arts laboratory and 
a nutrition laboratory are located in Presbyterian Hospital. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The Tod Memorial Library is located in Anna C. Maxwell Hall. Latest editions of 
approved reference books are supplied from the Anna C. Maxwell Reference Library 
Fund. Supplementary library facilities in the various clinical specialties are available for 
student use. The Library of the School of Medicine, located in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, provides a large number of reference books and current periodicals. Stu- 
dents in the Department of Nursing use this library as their main source of reference. 



PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

The Faculty reserves the right to make such changes in the program of instruction as 
experience may prove desirable. These changes may be made at any time deemed 
advisable. 



FIRST YEAR 






Winter Session 








Hours of 


Weehj of 




Instruction 


Concurrent 
Clinical 
Practice 


Anatomy — Physiology 9 


75 




Biochemistry y$ 


45 




Microbiology 3$ 


15 




Nutrition 2$ 


45 




Pharmacology — Nursing 3 


15 




Nursings — Introduction to nursing (inch Mental Health, I) 180 




Medicine — Surgery Clinical Nursing 15 — Clinical 






instruction 


30 


20* 


Orientation 


i 5 f 




Physical Education 


3°t 




TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 


375 




TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 


30 




Spring Session 






Anatomy — Physiology 10 


30 




Microbiology 36 


30 




Nursing 16 — (inch Mental Health, II) 


180 




Medical Nursing 






Surgical Nursing 






Diet Therapy 






Pharmacology, II 






Medicine — Surgery Clinical Nursing 20 — (inch 




24$ 


Clinical instruction) 




4 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



24O 
165 



Vacation 



* This figure comprises a total of 210 hours. 

t No academic credit. 

% Clinical practice includes 24 hours per week for is weeks in the Spring Session. 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

SECOND YEAR 

From September 15 to December 75 

Hours of Wee\s oj 
Instruction Concurrent 
Clinical 
Practice 
Sociology — Nursing 55 — Social foundations in nursing 45 
Nursing 45 

Medical and Surgical Specialities 45 

Nursing — Special Problems 
Nursing in Emergencies 
Medicine — Surgery Clinical Nursing 25 — Clinical 

instruction 45 16* 

TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 90 

TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 45 



BALANCE OF SECOND YEAR 

Surgical Clinical Nursing 3$ — Operating room technique 
(followed by recovery room, 2 weeks) Clinical in- 
struction 15 8 
Obstetric Nursing 50 45 
Obstetric Clinical Nursing 52 — Clinical instruction 45 12 
Pediatric Nursing 60 45 
Pediatric Clinical Nursing 62 — Clinical instruction 45 12 

TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION CjO 

TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION IO5 

Vacation 4 

* Clinical practice includes 24 hours per week for 6 weeks in the Winter Session. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 



THIRD YEAR 



OR ■> 



Sociology — Nursing 95 — Trends in nursing 
Psychiatric Nursing 65 

Psychiatric Clinical Nursing 67 — Clinical instruction 
'Neurologic Nursing yo 
Neurologic Clinical Nursing 72 — Clinical instruction 

Orthopedic Nursing 74 

^Orthopedic Clinical Nursing y6 — Clinical instruction 
Public Health Nursing 80 — Outpatient nursing (incl. 

outpatient nursing service) Clinical instruction 
Medicine Surgery go — Clinical instruction 

90A Gynecology 

90B Urology 

90C Ophthalmology and otolaryngology 
Medicine — Surgery g2 — (incl. electives) 

TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



Hours of 


Weekj oj 


Instruction 


Concurrent 




Clinical 




Practice 


30 




105 




45 


12 


30 




15 


8 


30 




15 





30 



15 


4 


15 


4 


15 


4 


30 


10 


165 




165 





Vacation 



SUMMARY OF INSTRUCTION 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



Academic 


Total Hours 


Credit 




52 


1,005* 


10 


510 



* This figure includes 45 hours which bear no academic credit. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Orientation. 15 hours (no academic credit). Professors Deleuran and Lee and Misses 
Lynch, Rathbun, Vanderbilt, and others. 

Orientation is designed to acquaint the student with the academic program and the facilities of the 
school, and the community. The program is carefully developed in co-operation with the Student Govern- 
ment Association; its members assume an active role in introducing the new student to community and 
professional living. 

Anatomy-Physiology 9 — Anatomy and physiology, I. 75 hours. 3 pts. Professors Cizek, 

Deleuran, Glaviano, and Noback and Misses Cameron, Gill, and Rathbun. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems of the 
human body with their component tissues. Correlation with the theory and practice of nursing is made 
through lecture, laboratory demonstration, and group discussion. 

Biochemistry 75 — Chemistry. 45 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Behre and Miss Gill. 

A course in chemistry correlating with physiology, microbiology, nutrition, and pharmacology. Em- 
phasis is placed on physiological chemistry as it applies to normal functioning of the body and to pathologi- 
cal conditions. 

Microbiology 35 — Microbiology, I. 15 hours. 1 pt. (credit to be completed in the Spring 

Session). Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

An elementary course stressing the importance of microbiology in nursing and in medicine, immunology, 
and sterilization. Some practice in bacteriological techniques will be given. This course will be followed 
in the Spring Session by Microbiology 36. 

Nutrition 25 — Nutrition and cookery. 45 hours. 2 pts. Miss Faulkner. 

A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Emphasis is placed 
upon the standards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficiency of the food essentials. In the preparation 
of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. In planning the meals the 
economic factor is stressed. 

Pharmacology-Nursing 3 — Pharmacology, I. 15 hours. 1 pt. Miss Gill. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles of drug administration, 
pharmaceutic preparations in common use, types of drug action, legislation concerning drug administra- 
tion, and the fundamental knowledge necessary for the study of advanced pharmacology. 

Nursing 5 — Introduction to nursing (incl. Mental Health I). 180 hours. 9 pts. Professors 
Lee and Pettit, Dr. McGowan and others, and Misses J. C. Brown, Del Vecchio, Dorbacker, 
Hamon, Lynch, Moore, Rathbun, and Reilly. 

An introduction to the basic principles of nursing with emphasis on physical and emotional health; 
the interaction of the community and the individual as related to health; the significance of illness to the 
individual, his family, and the community; the interrelationships of members of the health team in meeting 
the needs of the patient and his family; the meaning of the profession and the responsibilities entailed. 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 15 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, I. Clinical 

instruction. 30 hours. Professor Pettit and Misses Barrows, J. C. Brown, Del Vecchio, 

Dorbacker, Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, and Smith. 

Supervised practice in the care of mildly ill or convalescent patients averages eight hours per week, sup- 
plemented by two hours of planned clinical teaching. Group discussions are planned to aid the student to 
meet the nursing needs of her various patients and the problems in her own professional growth. 

Physical Education. 30 hours (no academic credit). Miss Rathbun. 

A fundamental course in body mechanics, swimming, folk and square dancing, and hiking — offered to 
increase posture consciousness, relaxation techniques, and the recreational interest of the student. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

SPRING SESSION 
Nursing 16 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, II. 180 hours. 12 pts. 

This area of the curriculum has been developed to provide the student with the opportunity to acquire 
knowledge and understanding of the principles of nursing and related sciences in the area of general 
medicine and surgery. An effort is made to correlate instruction by means of closely related clinical experi- 
ence including a planned teaching program. The following units are considered: 

Medical Nursing. 30 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Cosgriff and Miss J. C. Brown. 

Surgical Nursing. 30 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Ferrer and members of the Department of Surgery 
and Miss Moore. 

Nursing, II. 60 hours. 4 pts. Professors Deleuran and Pettit, Misses J. C. Brown, Del 
Vecchio, Dorbacker, Gill, Lynch, Moore, Reilly, and others. 

Menial Health, II. 15 hours. 1 pt. Dr. McGowan and Miss Lynch. 

Pharmacology, II. 30 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Plimpton and Miss Gill. 

Diet Therapy. 15 hours. 1 pt. Miss Faulkner. 

Anatomy-Physiology 10 — Anatomy and physiology, II. 30 hours. 1 pt. Professors 

Deleuran, Knowlton, and Sciarra, Drs. Bradley, Chace, Ferrer, and Frank, and Miss Gill. 

This unit of lectures and demonstration is a continuation of Anatomy-Physiology 9. It emphasizes normal 
physiology and compares it with the physiological changes in medical and surgical conditions. 

Microbiology 36 — Microbiology, II. 30 hours. 1 pt. Dr. Holden and Miss Gill. 

A continuation of Microbiology 55, considering specific pathogenic bacteria as the causative agents of 
disease. Attention is given to ways in which the nurse, knowing the characteristics of these organisms, may 
aid in the prevention of disease and its transmission. A study of some of the common communicable dis- 
eases is included. 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 20 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, II (inch Diet 
Service). Clinical instruction. 165 hours. Professors Cleveland and Petitt, and Misses 
Barrows, J. C. Brown, Del Vecchio, Dorbacker, Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, Smith, 
and Faulkner. 

Clinical assignments during this period are to the general medical and surgical units, where the student 
obtains supervised experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

Clinical conferences total approximately two and a half hours per week. The teaching is patient- 
centered and is developed to assist the student to apply her knowledge and skill in nursing situations. 

The student's understanding of the nutritional needs of the medical and surgical patient is developed 
by two weeks' experience in the Diet Service of each of these units. 

Experience in the care of patients throughout the twenty-four hours is provided by a two-week period 
of evening duty followed by a two-week period of night duty. 



SECOND YEAR 

FROM SEPTEMBER 15 TO DECEMBER 15 

Nursing 45 — Nursing in medicine and surgery. 45 hours. 2 pts. Professors Deleuran and 
Pettit, Misses Lynch and Reilly, and members of the staff of Medical and Surgical Special- 
ties. 

Medical and Surgical Specialties 

A unit concerned with basic concepts common to medical and surgical specialties in the areas of 
ophthalmology, otolaryngology, urology, and gynecology. 

Nursing-Special Problems 

A course concerned primarily with a problem-solving approach to teaching patients and their families; 
improvisation of equipment is included. Basic principles of teaching, learning, and methodology are intro- 
duced. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing in Emergencies 

A review of the basic knowledge essential to the intelligent management of emergency situations as they 
may arise in daily life. Nursing in atomic disaster is emphasized. 

Sociology-Nursing 55 — Social foundations in nursing. 45 hours. 2 pts. Professor Lee and 
Misses Hamon, Lynch, Sessoms, and others. 

This unit is designed to give the student an appreciation of the constantly changing role of the nurse by 
tracing important trends in nursing history. Emphasis is placed on the social significance of illness within 
the community as it affects the patient and his family. An awareness of the responsibility of the nurse in 
modern society is furthered through the discussion of particular social problems, community resources, and 
individual family studies. 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 25 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, HI. Clinical 
instruction. 45 hours. Professors Cleveland and Pettit and Misses Barrows, J. C. Brown, 
Del Vecchio, Dorbacker, Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, and Smith. 

This experience is offered concurrently with and following the Winter Session. Although the student has 
previously gained an appreciation of the social and teaching needs of patients, particular emphasis is 
placed on these two areas at this time. 

BALANCE OF SECOND YEAR 

Surgical Clinical Nursing 35 — Operating room technique (followed by recovery room, 2 
weeks). 15 hours. 6 weeks. Mrs. Mellor and members of the operating room team. 

The student is given an opportunity to recognize the major nursing needs of the patient during the 
operative period. Emphasis is placed on the psychological needs of the patient immediately preceding opera- 
tion. Application of the principles of aseptic technique in operating room practice is an important part of 
this experience. 

Recovery room experience (two weeks), affords the student an opportunity to develop further her 
observational and technical skills in giving care to patients immediately following surgery. 

Obstetric Nursing 50 and Obstetric Clinical Nursing 52 — Obstetric nursing and clinical 
instruction. 90 hours. 3 pts. 12 weeks. Professor Allanach, Misses Cameron and Hogan 
and members of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

This course provides the opportunity to acquire the special knowledge and skills necessary to provide 
safe nursing care to the mother and infant throughout the entire maternal cycle; to develop an under- 
standing of the psychological, social, and economic implications of obstetrics and their influence on the 
family and community; to develop an appreciation of the responsibility of the nurse in teaching the health 
principles related to the childbearing aspects of family life. 

Newer obstetric trends are presented, including principles and practice in relaxation exercises preparatory 
to labor. 

Concurrent supervised experience in the application of the basic principles is provided. 

Pediatric Nursing 60 and Pediatric Clinical Nursing 62 — Pediatric nursing and clinical 
instruction. 45 hours. 3 pts. 12 weeks. Professor Peto, Misses Dewey, Farrell, and Kent, 
and members of the Department of Pediatrics. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some understanding of the physical end emotional develop- 
ment of childhood and to familiarize her with the technique of sick children. 

The course is parallel to the clinical experience on the pediatric service, covering a twelve-week period. 



THIRD YEAR 

Sociology-Nursing 95 — Trends in nursing. 30 hours. Professors Deleuran, Lee, and Mutch, 
Miss Lynch, and special lecturers. 

Professional Adjustments, III 

This course broadens the student's understanding of her responsibility as a registered professional nurse 
and prepares her to take her place as a leader in community activities. Careers in professional nursing are 
studied by the student. Nursing leaders in public health, Government Nursing Services, and the major 
clinical areas of nursing act as consultants. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 25 

Psychiatric Nursing 65 and Psychiatric Clinical Nursing 67 — Psychiatric nursing and 
clinical instruction. 150 hours. 3 pts. 12 weeks. Professors Horwitz and Polatin, Miss 
Morgan, and members of the Department of Psychiatry and the New York State Psy- 
chiatric Institute. 

The aim of this course is to give the student an understanding of the known causes, prevention, treat- 
ment, and nursing care of patients with psychiatric disorders. The aspects of psychiatry which are em- 
bodied in all professional and social situations are included. 

Theory and practice in the total care of the patient includes consideration of the role of other dis- 
ciplines and the application of the principles of dynamic psychiatry. An orientation to the better- 
known schools of thought is given. 

Neurologic Nursing 70 and Neurologic Clinical Nursing 72 — Neurologic nursing and 
clinical instruction. 45 hours. 2 pts. 8 weeks. Professor Covell, Mrs. Delabarre, and mem- 
bers of the Department of Neurology. 

This course has its major focus on the problems of adjustment of the neurologic patient, with emphasis 
on the effect of various disease processes on the major areas of dysfunction of the nervous system. Patient- 
centered teaching is stressed with use of cardex plans of care, nursing conferences, and films that develop 
the team approach to the care of the neurologic patient. 

Orthopedic Nursing 74 and Orthopedic Clinical Nursing 76 — Orthopedic nursing and 
clinical instruction. 45 hours. 2 pts. 8 weeks. Professor Wilde, Miss Maclntire, and mem- 
bers of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. 

This course is given concurrently with the student clinical experience on the orthopedic service. Lectures 
discussions, clinics, and special observations are arranged to give the student a concept of the total care 
of patients with orthopedic conditions, including rehabilitation. Special emphasis is placed on the concept 
of long-term care and the psychological factors involved. The importance of the early recognition and 
prevention of deformities is stressed. 

Public Health Nursing 80 — Outpatient nursing (including outpatient nursing service). 

30 hours. 2 pts. 8 weeks. Misses Hamon and Watling. 

The aims of this experience are to provide for the student nursing experience with patients before and 
after hospitalization, to develop further the student's teaching skills, and to increase the student's knowl- 
edge of community health and social organizations. Supervision of this teaching program is assigned to 
a full-time public health instructor. Field trips are arranged to various health and social agencies, both 
official and nonofficial. 

Two weeks of instruction, observation, and experience in home nursing are a part of every student's 
schedule in connection with her outpatient department. The chief objective of this particular experience 
is to demonstrate continuity of patient care. The field experience is under the guidance of a full-time 
public health field instructor. During this period attention is focused on the preventive, educational, and 
social aspects of family health service. 

Medicine-Surgery 90 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, rV. Clinical instruction. 75 
hours. 3 pts. 

goA — Gynecology: Nursing in. 15 hours. 4 weeks. Professor Allanach, Misses Cameron 

and Derby, and members of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

This program provides an opportunity for the student to gain an appreciation of the nurse's role in 
the care of the patient with gynecological conditions. Assisting with the planning and conducting of 
predischarge classes for patients affords the student valuable experience in group teaching. 

goB — Urology: Nursing in. 15 hours. 4 weeks. Professor Cleveland, Miss Trebilcock, 
and members of the Department of Urology. 

This unit is arranged to show the modifications of the nursing of medical and surgical patients as they 
relate to urological conditions. Special needs of the geriatric patient and the patient with congenital 
anomalies are stressed. Patient and family teaching in relation to the posthospital care of these patients 
is emphasized. 

goC — Ophthalmology: Nursing in. 8 hours. 2 weeks. Miss Wright and members of 
the Department of Ophthalmology. 

A series of discussions, lectures, and planned observations developed to indicate the major nursing 
needs of patients with eye pathology. Special emphasis is given to emotional factors associated with 



26 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

disease in vision or blindness. An inspection of the facilities of rehabilitation and experience in the 
use of some of them are provided. Concurrent with this teaching students receive two weeks of clinical 
experience in the care of patients with ophthalrnological conditions. 

goC — Otolaryngology: Nursing in. 7 hours. 2 weeks. Miss Hagner and members of 

the Department of Otolaryngology. 

Planned instruction and clinical experience are offered concurrently during this period. Conferences, 
clinics, discussions, and special periods of observation are arranged to give the student a broad view of 
the aims of otolaryngology as they relate to hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients. Special observations 
are planned to give the student an appreciation of the value of early detection of speech and hearing dif- 
ficulties as well as an introduction to the facilities available to the deaf and to persons who have under- 
gone laryngectomy. Psychological, sociological, and medical problems related to this area are stressed and 
the role of the nurse defined. 

Medicine-Surgery 92 — Nursing in medicine and surgery (including electives). 30 hours. 
10 weeks. Professors Cleveland and Pettit and Misses Barrows, J. C. Brown, Del Vecchio, 
Dorbacker, Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, and Smith. 

This experience is provided on an advanced level and is developed according to the previous experience 
and current need of the individual student. Supervised experience is arranged to give the student an op- 
portunity to demonstrate her ability in giving quality nursing care to patients presenting major nursing 
problems. 

Special elective clinical experience is offered to a limited number of students at the Mary Harkness Con- 
valescent Home, one of the units of the Presbyterian Hospital; in rural community nursing at the Mary 
Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N.Y.; and in visiting nursing through the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York. Every effort is made to offer each student one or two elective services during her last six 
months in the school. 



THE COLUMBIA- PRESBYTERIAN 
MEDICAL CENTER 

NEW YORK CITY 



b*mq 



RE: 




^ r 



Babies Hospital 

Presbyterian Hospital 

Sloane Hospital 

New York Orthopaedic Hospital 

Harkness Pavilion 

Power plant 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

School of Dental and Oral Surgery 

Washington Heights Health and Teaching 

Center, New York City Department of 

Health 
School of Public Healdi 



Institute of Ophthalmology 

Maxwell Hall 

Neurological Insdtute 

New York State Psychiatric Insdtute and 

Hospital 
Bard Hall 
1 6. Storage 
Shops 
Housing 
Francis Delafield Hospital, New York City 

Department of Hospitals 
Edward S. Harkness Memorial Hall 



/ ': 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 



Fifty -fourth Series, No. 35 



September 1 1, 1954 




STACKS 
COLUMBIA UNIVER, 

MEDICAL LIBRARY 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 



IkW^SH ''•••. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 





FACULTY OF MEDICIN 
ESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
URSIN 



FOR THE WINTER AND SPRING SESSIONS 





COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 

63O WEST l68TH STREET • NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Columbia GUntoersiitp bulletin of information 

Fifty-fourth Series, No. 35 September 11, 1954 

Issued at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York 27, N.Y., weekly from 
January for forty-six consecutive issues. Reentered as second-class matter August 15, 
1952, at the Post Office at New York, N.Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 
1917, authorized. 

The series includes the Report of the President to die Trustees and die Announcements 
of the several Colleges and Schools relating to die work of the next year. These are made 
as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances 
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent upon written 
application to the Office of University Admissions, 322 University Hall, Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York 27, N.Y. Copies may be obtained in person from the Office of the 
Secretary, 213 Low Memorial Library. 

C. U. P. 6,000 — 1954 



PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS 



CONDENSED ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



The complete academic calendar for the year 1954-1955 may be obtained from the Office 
of the Secretary of the University. 

1954 

Tuesday. Orientation to program for Class of 1957. 

Wednesday. Registration. Class of 1957. 

Thursday. Registration (including the payment of fees) for students in 

the Classes of 1955 and 1956. 
Winter session begins for Class of 1957, First Year. 
Tuesday. Winter session begins for the Class of 1956, Second Year. 
Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday. 
Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 
Thursday. Vacation for Class of 1957 begins.* 
Saturday. Christmas Day. Holiday. 

1955 

Saturday. New Years Day. Holiday. 

Monday. Completion of course for Group A students of Class of 1955. 

Monday. Spring session begins for Class of 1957, First Year. 

Tuesday. Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Sunday. Baccalaureate Service for Class of 1955. 

Monday. Memorial Day. Holiday. 

Wednesday. Conferring of degrees on students of the Class of 1954 and 

Group A students of Class of 1955. Ceremony at Columbia University. 
Thursday. Conferring of diplomas on the Class of 1955. Ceremony at 

the Presbyterian Hospital. 
Monday. Independence Day. Holiday. 
Saturday. Completion of course for Group B and Group C students of 

the Class of 1955. 
Monday. Labor Day. Holiday. 



September 
September 
September 


7 
8 

9 


September 
November 


14 

2 


November 


25 


December 


23 


December 


25 


January 


1 


January 


3 


January 
February 

May 
May 


3i 
22 
29 
30 



June 



June 



July 4 

September 3 

September 5 



* In the first year of the course, one week of vacation is arranged during the Christmas holiday period. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Grayson Kirk, Ph.D., LL.D President of the University 

John A. Krout, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D. . . . Vice President and Provost of the University 
Willard C. Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Med.Sc.D. . . . Vice President in Charge o) 

Medical Affairs; Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Aura Edward Severinghaus, Ph.D Associate Dean and Secretary 

James E. McCormack, A.B., M.D Associate Dean {Graduate Studies) 

Harold W. Brown, M.D., D.P.H Associate Dean {Public Health) 

Maurice J. Hickey, D.M.D., M.D Associate Dean {Dental and Oral Surgery) 

Eleanor Lee, A.B., R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 



THE FACULTY 



Hattie E. Alexander 
J. Burns Amberson 
Dana W. Atchley 
E. Dwight Barnett 
James Bordley III 
Harold W. Brown 
Stanley M. Bysshe 
George F. Cahill 
E. Gurney Clark 
Hans T. Clarke 
Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
Robert C. Darling 
D. Anthony D'Esopo 
Samuel R. Detwiler 
John H. Dunnington 
Robert H. E. Elliott 
Earl T. Engle 
John W. Fertig 
Thomas P. Fleming 
Goodwin L. Foster 
Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 
Virginia K. Frantz 
Alfred Gilman 
Magnus I. Gregersen 
Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. 
Michael Heidelberger 
Maurice J. Hickey 
Horace L. Hodes 
Houghton Holliday 
George H. Humphreys II 
Harold W. Jacox 
Yale Kneeland, Jr. 
Lawrence C. Kolb 
Barnet M. Levy 
Robert F. Loeb 



James E. McCormack 
Rustin McIntosh 
Monroe A. McIver 
Irville H. MacKinnon 
Rollo J. Masselink 
H. Houston Merritt 
Frederick A. Mettler 
Carl T. Nelson 
John L. Nickerson 
Emanuel M. Papper 
George A. Perera 
J. Lawrence Pool 
Charles A. Ragan 
Willard C. Rappleye 
Dickinson W. Richards 
Walter S. Root 
Harry M. Rose 
Rudolph N. Schullinger 
Beatrice C. Seegal 
David Seegal 

Aura Edward Severinghaus 
Lawrence W. Sloan 
Alan DeForest Smith 
Gilbert P. Smith 
Harry P. Smith 
Thomas W. Stevenson 
Lewis R. Stowe 
Howard C. Taylor 
Kenneth B. Turner 
Harry B. van Dyke 
Carmine T. Vicale 
Theodore J. C. von Storch 
Abner Wolf 
Robert H. Wylie 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 3 

NURSING EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

E. Lee (chairman) , H. W. Brown, S. R. Detwiler, G. H. Humphreys II, L. C. Kolb, 
R. F. Loeb, R. McIntosh, J. M. A. Mutch, M. Peto, H. F. Pet-tit, H. C. Taylor, the 
Dean, ex officio 

ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE 

E. Lee (chairman), J. C. Brown, R. A. Lynch, E. Rathbun, F. L. Vanderbilt, the 
Dean, ex officio 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Eleanor Lee, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing; 

Acting Executive Officer, Department of Nursing 
A.B., Radcliffe, 1918; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

Mary E. Allanach, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1932; A.M., 1937; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1921 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Harriet M. Deleuran, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; A.M., 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1933 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen F. Pettit, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1936 

Elizabeth Wilcox, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 



Beatrice Ainslie, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1954; Graduate, Toronto Western Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Josephine C. Brown, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Duke, 1942; B.S., Columbia, 1945; A.M., 1951; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1945 

Beth L. Cameron, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1941 

Helen C. Delabarre, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; A.M., 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Angela J. Del Vecchio, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Chicago, 1945; A.M., Columbia, 1953; Graduate, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
1944 

Bern ice R. Derby Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Lucille M. Dewey Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Syracuse, 1947; A.M., Columbia, 1953; Graduate, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 1947 

Beatrice M. Dorbacker Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1950 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 5 

Dolores C. Farrell, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1952; Graduate, Cochran School of Nursing, 1947 

Alice K. Faulkner Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Cornell, 1946; A.M., Columbia, 1953 

Elizabeth S. Gill, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Elmira, 1927; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1937 

Esther M. Glad, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Augustana, 1950; M.N., Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Western Reserve University, 
1953 

Ruth M. Guinter, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1944; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1944 

Dorothy K. Hagner, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 

Constance C. Hamon, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York University, 1942; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1929 

Frances B. Havran, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presby- 
terian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Margaret J. Hawthorne, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1939; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Margaret A. Hogan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Cooley Dickinson School of Nursing, 1930 

Rose M. Hoynak, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1945 

Louisa M. Kent, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Connecticut College for Women, 1930; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Ruth A. Lynch, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women, 1932; A.M., New York University, 1943; B.S., Columbia, 1946; 
Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1946 

Lucille D. Manning, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., New York State College for Teachers, 1935; B.S., Columbia, 1949; Graduate, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1949 

Josephine E. Mellor, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1951; A.M., 1954; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1939 

Susan B. Moore, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., American University, 1939; B.S., Columbia, 1944; A.M., New York University, 1952; Graduate, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1943 

Edith E. Morgan, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; A.M., 1951; Graduate, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 1929 

Dorothy E. Reilly, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1943; M.S., Boston, 1950; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 

Ellen G. Smith, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1946; A.M., New York University, 1953; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1946 

Yvonne A. Trebilcock, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1948 

Elizabeth L. Watling Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1947; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1947 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Harriet B. Wright, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

A.B., Wellesley, 1915; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 



Eula W. Rathbun Recreational Director 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1925; A.M., Columbia, 1946 

Florence L. Vanderbilt, R.N Director of Health and Student Activities 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 



OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION GIVING COURSES 
LISTED IN THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 

BASIC SCIENCES 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Louis J. Cizek, M.D Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Dorothy D. Johnson, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Charles R. Noback, Ph.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

George K. Smelser, Ph.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

Chemistry 
Jeannette A. Behre, Ph.D Associate in Biochemistry 

Microbiology 
Margaret Holden, Ph.D Associate in Microbiology 

PUBLIC HEALTH 
Harold W. Brown, M.S., Sc.D., M.D., D.P.H. . . . Director, School of Public Health 

SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS IN NURSING 

Elizabeth R. Pritchard, M.S Director, Social Service Department, 

Presbyterian Hospital 

NURSING IN MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

Henry Aranow, Jr., M.D., Med. Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Robert R. Chace, M.D., Med. Sc.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Stuart W. Cosgriff, M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate in Medicine 

Jose M. Ferrer, Jr., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Charles W. Frank, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Saul B. Gusberg, M.D., Med.Sc.D Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 

Frederic Herter, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Ferdinand F. McAllister, M.D Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Abbie I. Knowlton, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John K. Lattimer, M.D., Med.Sc.D Assistant Professor of Clinical Urology 

Emanuel M. Papper, M.D Professor of Anesthesiology 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 7 

Calvin H. Plimpton, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Daniel Sciarra, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

NURSING IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

Arnold N. Fenton, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ruth C. Harris, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

David B. Moore, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Equinn W. Munnell, M.D Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 
Albert A. Plentl, M.D Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 
Charles M. Steer, M.D., Med.Sc.D. . . . Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 
Susan W. Williamson, M.D Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

NURSING IN PEDIATRICS 

Douglas S. Damrosch, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Peter R. Scaglione, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

NURSING IN NEUROLOGY 

Fritz J. Cramer, M.D Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurological Surgery 

H. Houston Merritt, M.D Professor of Neurology 

J. Lawrence Pool, M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

NURSING IN ORTHOPEDICS 

Harrison L. McLaughlin, M.D Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery 

Alan DeForest Smith, M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

NURSING IN PSYCHIATRY 

(including Mental Health) 
William S. Langford, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 



William A. Horwitz, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Phillip Polatin, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

NURSING COMMITTEE 

W. E. S. Griswald, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Henry P. Davison, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Frederic F. deRham, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Benjamin Coates Mrs. Grover O'Neill 

John H. Dunnington, M.D. Mrs. Stephen H. Philbin 

Miss Margaret Eliot Willard C. Rappleye, M.D. 

George H. Humphreys II, M.D. Alan DeForest Smith, M.D. 

Miss Eleanor Lee Mrs. Henry C. Taylor 

Robert F. Loeb, M.D. Howard C. Taylor, M.D. 

Mrs. Allen M. Look Mrs. Anton E. Walbridge 

Rustin McIntosh, M.D. Mrs. Staunton Williams 

H. Houstin Merritt, M.D. John S. Parke, ex officio 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, NURSING SERVICE 

Margaret Eliot, R.N Acting Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 192 1 

Marion D. Cleveland, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cecile Covell, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1936; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Nellie Estey, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1920 

A. Beatrice Langmuir, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Lottie M. Morrison, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

Graduate, Roosevelt Hospital School of Nursing, 1925 

J. M. Ada Mutch, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1948; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1936 

Marjorie Peto, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., New York University, 195 1; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1926 

Helen L. Scott, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1941; A.M., 1945; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Cora Louise Shaw, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1940; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1931 

Margaret Wells, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Wooster, 1927; A.M., Columbia, 1941; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
1929 

Delphine F. Wilde, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia, 1926; A.M., 1946; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1926 

Phyllis M. Young, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing 

A.B., Smith, 1924; A.M., Columbia, 1943; Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1927 

Lillian A. Oring, R.N Supervisor of Auxiliary Personnel 

Graduate, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 1947 






> 






HISTORY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is one of the large, modern medical 
centers of the East. The specialized hospitals of the Medical Center have histories and 
enviable professional reputations dadng back many years prior to their merger to form 
the Medical Center. The Presbyterian Hospital is traditionally progressive because of the 
constant study for improved methods of health care. This progressive attitude began 
with the founding of Presbyterian Hospital in 1868 and has continued through the years, 
as has its original aim of "affording medical and surgical aid and nursing care to sick or 
disabled persons of every creed, nationality, and color." The clinical facilities and oppor- 
tunities for learning are vast. 

The School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital was founded in 1892 by the Board 
of Managers. Anna C. Maxwell, R.N., A.M., the first director of the school, es- 
tablished the plans for administration and instruction and guided them for thirty years. 
Her contribution has had a lasting effect upon the growth of the profession to its present 
dignity and importance. Over three thousand nurses have been graduated since the open- 
ing of the school. 

The hospital's interest in teaching was further demonstrated by affording clinical 
education for the medical students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia 
University. This led to a permanent affiliation between the two institutions in 1921. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center at 168th Street, overlooking the Hudson 
River, was opened in 1928. The site was the gift of Mrs. Stephen V. Harkness and her 
son, Edward S. Harkness; both were generous contributors to the project. The Medical 
Center has continued to expand according to the needs of the community, medical re- 
search, and education. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons assumed the responsibility for the 
educational program of the School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital, and in 1937 
the University established the Department of Nursing of the Faculty of Medicine. This 
affiliation marked another step in the integration of the University and the hospitals at 
the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. The Department of Nursing is approved by 
the Accrediting Service of the National League for Nursing and is a member of the 
Department of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the National League for 
Nursing. 

AIMS 

For both the degree and the diploma students, the aim of the basic professional 
nursing program is to prepare qualified young women to practice nursing effectively in 
hospitals, homes, and in the various types of health agencies. Nursing is interpreted as 
including health promotion through education, care of the sick and injured, and their 
restoration to a useful place in society. 

The degree program, in addition to the above, is so planned that students in this group 
have the opportunity to utilize and further develop the greater maturity and educational 
experience which they bring to the situation. The wide and varied experiences of this 
program are directed toward challenging the students' knowledge and skills, tangible 
and intangible. 

Throughout her nursing education, the student is encouraged and provided the 
opportunity to become aware of the social and health needs of individuals and the com- 



io COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

munity, their effect upon the trends in national thinking, as well as the present and 
possible contribution of nursing to human welfare. 

Opportunity is provided for the continued development of the student physically, 
mentally, emotionally, and culturally with emphasis on her interests, needs, and responsi- 
bilities as a person, a member of die nursing profession, and as a citizen. 

The student is introduced to the various opportunities in nursing and is helped to 
select for further study and experience that field of nursing in which she will find her 
greatest satisfaction and to which she can make her optimum contribution. 



THE CHOICE OF A PROFESSION 

The young woman today finds a bewildering number of possibilities open to her as she 
considers her future. 

The spodight of public opinion is strongly focused on nursing as the need for the 
services of skilled, intelligent professional nurses continues. Estimates of the probable 
number required for the maintenance of health services throughout the nation, in Army, 
Navy, civilian, and veterans hospitals and in urban and rural communities, call for many 
more professional nurses than are available at present. This demand is increased by the 
broadening concepts of world leadership that our country is being asked to assume. 

A professional education in nursing affords a broad understanding of health needs as 
they relate to individuals and groups, as well as an appreciadon of the role of the nursing 
profession. This preparation is personally valuable to the nurse and also enables her to 
make major contributions to planning, which is related to nursing and health care in a 
great variety of situations. Graduate nurses have proven themselves to be valuable mem- 
bers of governing boards of many organizataions in communities all over the world. 

The candidate for nursing who is serious in her interest and plans should evaluate 
her qualifications candidly and thoroughly. 

A high degree of physical endurance is essential. The handicap of any physical defect 
is magnified in nursing. Conditions which may seem too insignificant to mention may 
be disqualifying for a strenuous course of study and practice. 

Academic requirements are outlined on page 12. The school will welcome an oppor- 
tunity to guide its candidates well in advance of the date of entrance. 

It is highly desirable to secure some experience as a volunteer in a hospital before en- 
tering a school of nursing. There are many opportunities for trying out practical "work- 
samples" of nursing and securing some contact with patients, even at an elementary 
level. Such a procedure furnishes an excellent laboratory for proving one's fitness for 
nursing and the seriousness of one's interest in the problems of health and welfare. 



CAREERS IN NURSING 

The program in nursing at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center offers excellent 
preparation for the countless opportunities which are open to registered professional 
nurses in different fields. 

In the institutional field a major challenge is offered to nurses who are able to give 
expert bedside care. Nurses with particular interest and ability in guiding others in 
giving patient care will find opportunities to fill positions of "team leaders." With ad- 
ditional experience and preparation head nurse, supervisory, and teaching positions are 
open to diose who qualify. There are many opportunities for those who wish to specialize 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING n 

in various clinical branches of nursing, such as pediatrics, obstetrics, psychiatry, or 
orthopedics. 

Public health nursing offers a large and growing field with a diversity of activities 
which affect all groups of society. It includes visiting nursing, school and industrial 
nursing, and many phases of educational and preventive programs. 

There are opportunities for important service and influence in a number of government 
services — the Veterans Administration, the Public Health Service, and the Army and the 
Navy Nurse Corps. 

Many universities, such as Columbia, give excellent courses to graduate nurses wishing 
to prepare themselves for executive or teaching positions in schools of nursing or hospitals, 
or in public health nursing. 

Whether practicing her profession in the hospital, the home, the industrial plant, or 
the rural community, the modern nurse occupies a position of responsibility and honor. 
She is constantly in contact with the medical practitioner, the public health officer, the 
industrial physician, and the social worker, as well as with governmental and voluntary 
relief agencies and others concerned with the health of the community. American nurses 
have a large share of responsibility in restoring health and welfare services in many 
parts of the world. The opportunities for service increase rather than diminish, both at 
home and abroad. 



THE NURSING COURSE 

APPLICATION 

Candidates for admission must be between die ages of eighteen and thirty-five and must 
present a record of good healdi. All candidates are required to make formal application 
in writing on blanks supplied by the school. It is desirable to make applicadon at least one 
year in advance of the date of desired entrance. After the application has been submitted, 
the academic record of die candidate will be secured by the Department of Nursing from 
the college or high school attended. Students entering from high school should present 
a general average of at least ten points above the passing mark of their school, together 
with a standing in the upper third of their class. While no such specific requirement is 
made for college students, preference is always given to those who have shown evidence 
of ability and achievement. 

An appointment for a personal interview and the aptitude tests and for physical 
examination by the school physician will be made by the Department of Nursing, prob- 
ably within six months of the desired date of entrance. 

An applicant living at too great a distance to arrange for the preliminary interview 
and examination is accepted on condition that she meet all requirements at the time of 
admission. Failure to do so will necessitate immediate withdrawal. She should, therefore, 
come financially prepared to return home in case such a situation arises. 

Instructions about uniforms and equipment will be sent following final acceptance. 

Application blanks and any further information about the course in nursing may be 
secured from the Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University, 630 
West 168th Street, New York 32, N.Y. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The basic course in nursing is an integral part of the educational program of Columbia 
University, and all students in the Department of Nursing are registered as University 
students. The course includes instruction in the basic sciences; theory and practice of 
nursing techniques; clinical experience in medical, surgical, obstetric, pediatric, and 
psychiatric nursing; nutrition; and various specialties and electives in die Presbyterian 
Hospital and affiliated institutions. 

No matter what field of specialization the candidate expects to enter, the basic course 
is essentially the same for all students. Those who have had previous college education 
are expected to maintain a higher level of achievement, both in the classroom and on 
the wards. 

The course in nursing covers a period of three years for all students except those 
entering with a baccalaureate degree acceptable to the University (see below). 

ADMISSION 

Classes are admitted once a year, in September. 

Students will be admitted to the basic courses under one of the following classifications: 

Group A — Students who hold a baccalaureate degree acceptable to Columbia University 
and to the New York State Education Department may register with advanced time 
credit of eight months, completing the course in two years and four months. Such 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 13 

students are considered candidates for die degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for 
the diploma. 

Group B — Students who have satisfactorily completed at least two years of study in a 
college approved by Columbia University and the New York State Education Department 
may register for the basic course in nursing to be completed in diree years. Such students 
are considered candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science as well as for the diploma. 
The sixty points in liberal arts required for admission on diis basis should include: 

Points 

Requirements: Biology, chemistry, 1 or physics 8 

English 6 

Psychology 6 

Sociology 6 

26 

Electives: Language, history, mathematics, economics, philosophy 

or religion, 2 fine arts or supplementary courses in the re- 
quired fields 34 

No credit will be granted for commercial, home economics, physical 
education, or vocational courses. No credit will be granted for any one- 
point course. 

This program is frequently referred to as a five-year course — two years in a college or 
university elsewhere and three years in the basic course in nursing here. 

Group C — Students who have completed a part of a college course but do not meet 
the requirements outlined under A and B, may register for die diree-year basic course, 
receiving the diploma in nursing upon completion. Preference is given to candidates with 
some college preparation previous to entrance. The opportunity to register for the three- 
year basic course is also offered to a selected number of well-prepared students who hold 
a high school diploma or its equivalent, acceptable to Columbia University and to die 
New York State Education Department, and who show evidence of satisfactory academic 
preparation in sixteen units of subject matter. Students entering on this basis must meet 
the requirements as prescribed by the New York State Education Department and the 
requirements for entrance to the School of Nursing as follows: 

English, 4 units; science, 2 units (chemistry and either biology or general science) ; 
mathematics, 1 unit (algebra or geometry); history or social studies, 2 units; 
electives, 7 units in 2- or 3-unit sequences in languages or the above required sub- 
jects. A total of 16 units is required, and the University allows no credit for com- 
mercial or home economics courses. 

Special programs offered by Columbia and other universities enable a student to obtain 
a B.S. degree in a reasonable length of time following graduation. The number of credits 
needed is determined individually. 

It is important that the school or college and the courses of study be approved by the 
University before final selections are made. Applicants should therefore communicate 
with the Department of Nursing two years in advance of the date of entrance if possible. 

1 Chemistry is required if it has not been taken in high school. 

a A maximum of six credits may be allowed for courses in religion or speech. 



i 4 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending courses every student must file a registration blank giving such 
information as may be required. First-year students register on the second Wednesday, 
and second- and third-year students on the second Thursday, in September. Registration 
takes place in Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

FEES 

The application fee of $10 is payable with the application. It covers the cost of assem- 
bling credentials and of the physical examination and aptitude tests, the results of which 
determine the candidate's eligibility. This fee is not returnable regardless of the action 
taken on the application for admission. 

The University fee of $40 for the academic year or fraction thereof is payable each 
year on the day of registration in September. The application fee is credited on the 
University fee of the first term. 

Students taking the course as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science pay a 
tuition fee of $500 in two installments: $250 at the beginning of the first year and $250 
at the beginning of the second year. Students taking the course as candidates for the 
diploma pay a tuition fee of $400 in two installments: $200 at the beginning of the 
first year and $200 at the beginning of the second year. 

A summary of these fees is given below to aid the student in estimating the probable 
cost of the course in nursing (see page 12 for classification). The cost of the college study 
preceding entrance to the nursing course in Group B will depend entirely upon the 
institution attended. 

Group A Group B Group C 
Application $10 $10 $10 

First tuition 250 250 200 

Second tuition 250 250 200 

University fees 90 no no 

Degree application 20 20 



All checks for tuition and University fees must be made payable to Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Throughout the course, students are allowed maintenance and a reasonable amount 
of laundry without charge. In the first term of the first year the student provides her own 
uniforms and other required equipment, adding approximately $75 to the above totals. 
School uniforms are provided by the hospital for the remainder of the nursing course. 

Personal expenses vary with the individual. Twenty-five dollars per month has been 
found to be a satisfactory allowance, exclusive of clothes and vacations. 

SCHOLARSHIPS, STIPENDS, AND LOANS 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing gives a 
limited number of scholarships of $75 each to be awarded annually to students whose 
record of achievement in classes and clinical practice is high, whose health is excellent, 
and who are making a contribution to the social life of the school. These scholarships 
are open to students after they have been in the school for six months. 




THE COLUMBIA-; 




1EDICAL CENTER 



IT4I 



^ 



# 



JULflU. 



\ 




DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 15 

University stipends or grants-in-aid are available to students in need of financial as- 
sistance. These funds apply against tuition and are granted in amounts of $50. 

The Dean Sage Scholarship has been given in memory of Mr. Dean Sage, late President 
of the Presbyterian Hospital Board of Trustees. This scholarship covers the cost of tuition 
and University fees for a degree candidate during her three years in the school. 

Three new scholarship funds to aid students in the payment of their tuition were es- 
tablished in 1952: 

The fane McAllister Scholarship Fund is to be used to help pay the tuition fee of a 
second-year student in the Department of Nursing in need of financial assistance to com- 
plete her nursing course. 

The Margaret E. Conrad Scholarship Fund was established in June, 1952, the income 
of which is to be awarded annually as a scholarship to an entering student in the degree 
program. 

The Mary Sencindiver Specht Scholarship Fund was established in August, 1952, the 
income of which, amounting to $50, is awarded to an entering student in the degree 
program. 

Special scholarships are granted from time to time by individuals or groups. 

A student loan fund is maintained from which students may borrow reasonable amounts 
without interest at any time after the first term. 

Limited opportunity for employment is open to students with good academic, com- 
munity, and health records. Selected appointments for child care and clerical assistance 
in the Tod Memorial Library and general typing provide opportunity for earning money. 
It should be understood, however, that at best this earning can only supplement incidental 
expenses. 

Application for assistance from any of these sources must be made in writing to the 
Department of Nursing. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Division of Nursing Education of Teachers College, Columbia University, offers 
to graduate nurses the opportunity of preparing themselves further for work in the 
nursing school, hospital, and public health fields. Those who receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on completion of the nursing courses may work toward a Master of 
Arts degree. Those who receive the diploma only may be accepted for the work for the 
Bachelor of Science degree provided they meet the special requirements of the division. 

Advanced courses with a clinical nursing major, leading to the Master of Science 
degree, are offered by the Department of Nursing to graduate nurses who hold accept- 
able bachelor's degrees and who have had satisfactory experience. 

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing has two 
endowed funds for scholarships for advanced study in nursing. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

A student who has fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a degree, 
certificate, or diploma in the regular course is enrolled as a matriculated student of the 
University. Acceptance is based on grounds of character and health as well as on the 
fulfillment of the academic requirements. 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student of the 



16 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

University during the session for which she is registered unless her connection with the 
University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student registered in any 
school or college of the University shall at the same dme be registered in any other 
school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other institution, without the 
specific authorization of die dean or director of the school or college of the University 
in which she is first registered. 

The Faculty of Medicine reserves die right to refuse continuation in the Department 
of Nursing of any student who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the conditions 
of study in the department. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, die receipt by her of 
academic credits, her graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the granting of 
any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the University, which is 
free to cancel her registration at any time on any grounds which it deems advisable. The 
disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the President in such cases as he 
deems proper, and, subject to the reserved powers of the President, in the dean of each 
faculty and the director of the work of each administrative board. 



WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic stand- 
ing and not subject to discipline who may desire to withdraw from the University; but no 
student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entided to a discharge without the 
assent of her parent or guardian furnished in writing to the Executive Officer of the De- 
partment of Nursing. 

The Executive Officer of the Department of Nursing may, for reasons of weight, grant 
a leave of absence to a student in good standing. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

The passing grade of the School of Nursing is 75 percent in each subject, according 
to the standard set by the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

A deficiency examination, for which there is a fee of $3.00, will be required of every 
student failing to receive a passing grade in any course. Failure to obtain a passing grade 
will be sufficient reason for asking a student to repeat the course or to resign from the 
school. 

GRADUATION 

At the Commencement exercises of Columbia University the degree of Bachelor of 
Science will be conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the prescribed 
course in die Department of Nursing and who are recommended by the Faculty of Medi- 
cine. 

Every student completing the course will receive the diploma in nursing from the 
Presbyterian Hospital, upon recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. 

The diploma admits the graduate to membership in the Alumnae Association of the 
School of Nursing of the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York, and, together 
with her state license to practice nursing (R.N.), it entitles her to membership in the 
American Nurses Association and other professional organizations. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 17 

QUALIFICATION FOR REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSE (R.N.) 

A registered school of nursing is one which meets the educational requirements of 
the Board of Regents of the University of die State of New York. Having met these 
requirements, its graduates are eligible for the examinations of the Board of Regents. 
These examinations are held at intervals during the year under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Education of New York State. After passing these examinations the graduate 
nurse becomes a Registered Professional Nurse (R.N.) 

According to the law in New York State, only those persons who have filed intentions 
of becoming United States citizens may be admitted to the examinations for license to 
practice as registered nurses. Candidates who are not citizens should discuss this question 
carefully before filing application papers for entrance to the school. 



COLUMBIA'S BICENTENNIAL 

In 1954 Columbia University is celebrating its 200th birthday. The theme of this 
Bicentennial Celebration is "Man's Right to Knowledge and the Free Use Thereof," a 
theme that Columbia has exemplified in its colleges and schools for nearly 200 years and 
to which it will give continuing emphasis in the future. Three great convocations are 
planned for 1954. Preceding and following each of these convocations a conference is 
held, bringing together members of the Columbia Faculties and other outstanding scholars 
to demonstrate, in the spirit and purpose of their discussions, the Bicentennial theme. The 
year 1954 is one of the greatest, most important years in Columbia's long and distinguished 
history, and a year which reiterates Columbia's unfailing faith in the future. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESIDENCE HALL 

Anna C. Maxwell Hall, 179 Fort Washington Avenue, is the residence of the School 
of Nursing. A modern building of fireproof construction overlooking the Hudson River, 
it is connected by underground passage with the other buildings of the Medical Center. 
Reception rooms, dining room, snack bar, library, and recreational facilities are located 
in this building. Each student has a single room with running water. Every effort has 
been made to create a homelike atmosphere and provide wholesome living conditions. 

All students under the Department of Nursing are required to live in the residence hall 
during the course of study. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Emphasis is placed on the importance of healthful living and die particular significance 
of this to the nurse as a person and as a health teacher. Through individual and group 
conferences, as well as student committees of the Student Government Association, health 
practices and student activities are carefully considered. Every effort is made to maintain 
a positive approach to the individual's responsibility for her own well-being, both 
emotional and physical. 

The health of the student is closely supervised. Physical examinations are made at 
regularly scheduled periods and at other times, when necessary, by the school physician; 



18 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

laboratory investigations are made when indicated. Chest X-ray and tuberculin tests are 
done semiannually. Vaccinations widi Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) are advised for 
diose students whose tuberculin tests are negative. The written consent of parents is re- 
quired before vaccination with BCG, as the procedure is optional. Students are under the 
care of the school physician or surgeon during their registration in the school. Within 
reasonable limits, the hospital assumes the cost of medical care of illness originating dur- 
ing the student period. The expenses of dental care and eye refraction must be borne by 
the student. 

VACATION 

Each student in the three-year program is allowed twelve weeks of vacadon divided 
as follows: one week at Christmas and four weeks in the summer during the first year; 
four weeks in the summer during the second year and three weeks in the third year. 
A student who is eligible for the eight months' time credit is allowed nine weeks of 
vacation: one week at Christmas and four weeks in the summer during the first year; 
four weeks during the last year. The dates on which vacations are given are arranged 
according to the student's program. 

In addition to vacations, every student has ten holidays a year. 

RELIGION 

The school is nonsectarian. Hours on duty are so arranged that each student may attend 
the place of worship she prefers at least once on Sundays. Morning devotions are held each 
day and all students reporting on duty are expected to attend. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The Student Handbook, published by the Student Government Association, contains a 
detailed account of the various student activities as well as the constitution and by-laws 
of the association. Vital Signs, written and edited by students, is the student newspaper. 

The cocurricular program is under the guidance of the recreational director. Tennis 
courts in the hospital garden, swimming pool, gymnasium, and game room in Maxwell 
Hall offer opportunity for recreation. A station wagon owned by the school provides 
transportation for recreational and educational trips. 

TEACHING FACILITIES 

Amphitheaters, classrooms, and laboratories of the Faculty of Medicine are used for 
instrucdon by the Department of Nursing. A fully equipped nursing arts laboratory and 
a nutrition laboratory are located in Presbyterian Hospital. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The Tod Memorial Library is located in Anna C. Maxwell Hall. Latest editions of 
approved reference books are supplied from the Anna C. Maxwell Reference Library 
Fund. Supplementary library facilities in the various clinical specialties are available for 
student use. The library of the School of Medicine, located in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, provides a large number of reference books and current periodicals. Stu- 
dents in the Department of Nursing use this library as their main source of reference. 



PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

The Faculty reserves the right to make such changes in the program of instruction as 
experience may prove desirable. These changes may be made at any time deemed 
advisable. 



FIRST YEAR 






Winter Session 








Hours of 


Weeks of 




Instruction 


Concurrent 
Clinical 
Practice 


Anatomy-Physiology 9 


75 




Biochemistry 7$ 


45 




Microbiology 35 


15 




Nutrition 25 


45 




Pharmacology-Nursing 3 


15 




Nursing 5 — Introduction to nursing (including Mental 




Health, I) 


180 




Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 75 — Clinical 






instruction 


30 


20* 


Orientation 


I5f 




Physical Education 


3°t 




TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 


375 




TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 


30 




Spring Session 






Anatomy-Physiology 10 


30 




Microbiology 36 


30 




Nursing 16— (including Mental Health, II) 


180 




Medical and Surgical Nursing 






Diet Therapy 






Pharmacology, II 






Public Health 






Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 20 — Clinical 






instruction 




24t 


Diet Service 




4 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



24O 
165 



Vacation 



* This figure represents a total of 210 hours. 

t No academic credit. 

j Clinical practice includes 24 hours per week for 15 weeks in the Spring Session. 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

SECOND YEAR 



Hours of Weehj of 
Instruction Concurrent 
Clinical 



Sociology-Nursing 55 — Social foundations in nursing 45 

Nursing 45 45 

Medical and Surgical Specialties 

Nursing — Patient Teaching 

Nursing in Emergencies 
Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 25 (including recovery 

room, 2 weeks) — Clinical instruction 45 

TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION CjO 

TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 45 

Surgical Clinical Nursing 35 — Operating room technique. 

Clinical instruction 15 

Obstetric Nursing $0 45 

Obstetric Clinical Nursing 52 — Clinical instruction 45 

Pediatric Nursing 60 45 

Pediatric Clinical Nursing 62 — Clinical instruction 45 

TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 90 

TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 105 

Vacation 
* Clinical practice includes 24 hours per week for 5 weeks in the Winter Session. 



Practice 



>— " > — 



M 




With permission of the Woman's Home Co. 
SWIMMING POOL ACTIVITIES ARE IMPORTANT IN STUDENT RECREATION 



THE STUDENTS LEAVING FOR A FIELD TRIP IN THE SCHOOL STATION WAGON 



Lawrence G. 



-■ . ..r^y^rijP fo ' .•- 




r& 



jtajjr; 



v i 



i\ 



* SCHOOL o OF o NURSI NG » RESIDENCE* 






r 



rgT-r 



>\\1 



^^H ^ 





tft^ty 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 



21 



THIRD YEAR 



OR^ 



Sociology-Nursing g$ — Trends in nursing 
Psychiatric Nursing 65 

Psychiatric Clinical Nursing 6j — Clinical instruction 
"Neurologic Nursing yo 
Neurologic Clinical Nursing 72 — Clinical instruction 

Orthopedic Nursing 74 

Orthopedic Clinical Nursing j6 — Clinical instruction 

Public Health Nursing 80 — Outpatient nursing (including 

outpatient nursing service). Clinical instruction 30 

Medicine-Surgery go — Clinical instruction 

goA — Gynecology 15 

goB — Urology 15 

goC — Ophthalmology and otolaryngology 15 

Medicine-Surgery 92 — (including electives) 30 

TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 165 

TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 165 

Vacation 



Hours of 


Wechj of 


Instruction 


Concurrent 




Clinical 




Practice 


30 




105 




45 


12 


30 




15 


8 


30 




1 J 5 





4 

4 

4 

10 



SUMMARY OF INSTRUCTION 



TOTAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION 
TOTAL CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



Academic 


Total Hours 


Credit 




55 


1,005* 


10 


510 



* This figure includes 45 hours which bear no academic credit. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FIRST YEAR 

WINTER SESSION 

Orientation. 15 hours (no academic credit). Professors Deleuran and Lee and Misses 
Lynch, Rathbun, Vanderbilt, and others. 

Orientation is designed to acquaint the student with the academic program and the facilities of the 
school, and with the community. The program is carefully developed in cooperation with the Student 
Government Association; its members assume an active role in introducing the new student to community 
and professional living. 

Anatomy-Physiology 9 — Anatomy and physiology, I. 75 hours. 3 pts. Professors Cizek, 
Darling, Deleuran, Johnson, and Noback. Dr. Gliavano and Misses Cameron, Gill, and 
Rathbun. 

A study of the development, normal structure, and functions of the various organs and systems of the 
human body with their component tissues. Correlation with the theory and practice of nursing is made 
through lecture, laboratory demonstration, and group discussion. 

Biochemistry 75 — Chemistry. 45 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Behre and Miss Gill. 

A course in chemistry correlating with physiology, microbiology, nutrition, and pharmacology. Em- 
phasis is placed on physiological chemistry as it applies to normal functioning of the body and to pathologi- 
cal conditions. 

Microbiology 35 — Microbiology, I. 15 hours. 1 pt. (credit to be completed in the Spring 

Session) . Dr. Holden, Miss Gill, and members of the Department of Microbiology. 

An elementary course stressing the importance of microbiology in nursing and in medicine, immunology, 
and sterilization. Some practice in bacteriological techniques will be given. This course will be followed 
in the Spring Session by Microbiology 56. 

Nutrition 25 — Nutrition and cookery. 45 hours. 2 pts. Miss Faulkner. 

A study of the nutritive requirements of the body and the food sources of each. Emphasis is placed 
upon the standards for a normal diet and the effects of a deficiency of the food essentials. In the preparation 
of food, emphasis is given to appearance, flavor, and preservation of food value. In planning the meals the 
economic factor is stressed. 

Pharmacology-Nursing 3 — Pharmacology, I. 15 hours. 1 pt. Miss Gill. 

A course designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles of drug administration, 
pharmaceutic preparations in common use, types of drug action, legislation concerning drug administra- 
tion, and the fundamental knowledge necessary for the study of advanced pharmacology. 

Nursing 5 — Introduction to nursing (including Mental Health, I). 180 hours. 9 pts. Pro- 
fessors Langford, Lee, Pettit, and others, and Misses J. C. Brown, Del Vecchio, Dorbacker, 
Hamon, Lynch, Moore, Rathbun, and Reilly. 

An introduction to the basic principles of nursing with emphasis on physical and emotional health; 
the interaction of the community and the individual as related to health; the significance of illness to the 
individual, his family, and the community; the interrelationships of members of the health team in meeting 
the needs of the patient and his family; the meaning of the profession and the responsibilities entailed. 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 15 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, I. Clinical 
instruction. 30 hours. Professor Pettit and Misses Brown, Del Vecchio, Dorbacker, Guinter, 
Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, Smith, and Mrs. Havran. 

Supervised practice in the care of mildly ill or convalescent patients averages eight hours per week, sup- 
plemented by two hours of planned clinical teaching. Group discussions are planned to aid the student to 
meet the nursing needs of her various patients and the problems in her own professional growth. 

Physical Education. 30 hours (no academic credit) . Miss Rathbun. 

A fundamental course in body mechanics, swimming, folk and square dancing, and hiking — offered to 
increase posture consciousness, relaxation techniques, and the recreational interest of the student. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 23 

SPRING SESSION 
Nursing 16 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, II. 180 hours. 12 pts. 

This area of the curriculum has been developed to provide the student with the opportunity to acquire 
knowledge and understanding of the principles of nursing and related sciences in the area of general 
medicine and surgery. An effort is made to correlate instruction by means of closely related clinical experi- 
ence including a planned teaching program. The following units are considered: 

Medical Nursing. 30 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Cosgriff and Miss Brown. 

Surgical Nursing. 30 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Ferrer and members of the Department of 
Surgery and Miss Dorbacker. 

Public Health. Professor Brown and Miss Hamon. 

Nursing, II. 60 hours. 4 pts. Professors Deleuran and Pettit, Misses Brown, Del Vecchio, 
Dorbacker, Gill, Lynch, Moore, Reilly, and others. 

Mental Health, II. 15 hours. 1 pt. Professor Langford and Miss Lynch. 

Pharmacology, II. 30 hours. 2 pts. Dr. Plimpton and Miss Gill. 

Diet Therapy. 15 hours. 1 pt. Miss Faulkner. 

Anatomy-Physiology 10 — Anatomy and physiology, II. 30 hours. 1 pt. Professors 

Deleuran, Knowlton, and Sciarra, Drs. Ferrer, and Frank, and Miss Gill. 

This unit of lectures and demonstrations is a continuation of Anatomy-Physiology 9. It emphasizes normal 
physiology and compares it with the physiological and pathological changes in medical and surgical 
conditions. 

Microbiology 36 — Microbiology, II. 30 hours. 1 pt. Dr. Holden, Miss Gill, and members 
of the Department of Microbiology. 

A continuation of Microbiology 35, considering specific pathogenic bacteria as the causative agents of 
disease. Attention is given to ways in which the nurse, knowing the characteristics of these organisms, may 
aid in the prevention of disease and its transmission. A study of some of the common communicable dis- 
eases is included. 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 20 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, II (including 
Diet Service). Clinical instruction. 165 hours. Professors Cleveland and Petitt, and Misses 
Brown, Del Vecchio, Dorbacker, Faulkner, Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, Smith, and 
Mrs. Havran. 

Clinical assignments during this period are to the general medical and surgical units, where the student 
obtains supervised experience in the fundamentals of nursing care. 

Clinical conferences total approximately two and a half hours per week. The teaching is patient- 
centered and is developed to assist the student to apply her knowledge and skill in nursing situations. 

The student's understanding of the nutritional needs of the medical and surgical patient is developed 
by two weeks' experience in the diet service of each of these units. 

Experience in the care of patients throughout the twenty-four hours is provided by a two-week period 
of evening duty followed by a two-week period of night duty. 



SECOND YEAR 

Nursing 45 — Nursing in medicine and surgery. 45 hours. 2 pts. Professors Deleuran and 
Pettit, Misses Lynch and Reilly, and members of the staff of Medical and Surgical Special- 
ties. 

Medical and Surgical Specialties 

A unit concerned with concepts of long-term illness and rehabilitation common to medical and surgical 
specialties. 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Nursing — Patient Teaching 

A course concerned primarily with a problem-solving approach to teaching patients and their families; 
improvisation of equipment is included. Basic principles of teaching, learning, and methodology are intro- 
duced. 

Nursing in Emergencies 

A review of the basic knowledge essential to the intelligent management of emergency situations as they 
may arise in daily life. Nursing in atomic disaster is emphasized. 

Sociology-Nursing 55 — Social foundations in nursing. 45 hours. 2 pts. Professor Lee and 
Misses Hamon, Lynch, Pritchard, and others. 

This unit is designed to give the student an appreciation of the constantly changing role of the nurse by 
tracing important trends in nursing history. Emphasis is placed on the social significance of illness within 
the community as it affects the patient and his family. An awareness of the responsibility of the nurse in 
modern society is furthered through the discussion of particular social problems, community resources, and 
individual family studies. 

Medicine-Surgery Clinical Nursing 25 — Nursing in medicine and surgery, HI (including 
recovery room, 2 weeks). Clinical instruction. 45 hours. Professors Cleveland and Pettit 
and Misses Brown, Del Vecchio, Dorbacker, Guinter, Hoynak, Moore, Reilly, Smith, and 
Mrs. Havran. 

This experience is offered concurrently with and following the Winter Session. Although the student has 
previously gained an appreciation of the social and teaching needs of patients, particular emphasis is